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Old 06-17-2018, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Originally Posted by Enean View Post
The Midwest is so varied. I live in Wisconsin, currently, and it's nothing like the Ozarks. Neither is Missouri, for that matter.
I was born in Wisconsin and that was my impression of the Midwest. When I visited Missouri I expected it to be somewhat similar to WI...afterall they are both Midwestern states. Was I ever shocked on how different it was...how Southern it seemed.Yes the Midwest is varied, the most varied region.
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Old 06-17-2018, 01:14 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
I was born in Wisconsin and that was my impression of the Midwest. When I visited Missouri I expected it to be somewhat similar to WI...afterall they are both Midwestern states. Was I ever shocked on how different it was...how Southern it seemed.Yes the Midwest is varied, the most varied region.
Most of rural Missouri has significant southern influences across the board, and even the northern portions of the state that many state are more "solidly Midwest" have significant southern influences as well. St. Louis and Kansas City are more Midwest overall, but southern influenced. The rest of the state is a mixture of the South and Midwest, with areas south of KC and STL being more southern leaning overall. Yes, I have lived in WI, and MO. WI has very little southern influence, huge difference compared to the Lower Midwest/Upper South.
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Old 06-17-2018, 02:59 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
I was born in Wisconsin and that was my impression of the Midwest. When I visited Missouri I expected it to be somewhat similar to WI...afterall they are both Midwestern states. Was I ever shocked on how different it was...how Southern it seemed.Yes the Midwest is varied, the most varied region.
Missouri would naturally seem different from Wisconsin on most scales. Climate and geography in the first place. There are similarities as well. Missouri is a heartland mix and would be even more different from Mississippi or Alabama.
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Old 06-17-2018, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
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Missouri has a strong Baptist influence more so than any state that is considered Midwestern (we are assuming that Oklahoma is grouped with the South here). The leading congregation is Baptist in pretty much all of the rural counties in Missouri (even the ones that border Iowa). In Indiana and Illinois, this is not the case for the most part once one gets north of I-70.
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Old 06-17-2018, 09:50 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Many Baptists would be stunned to learn that their existence is considered a hallmark of southern culture. That's probably the last thing on their mind. There's over 60 Baptist congregational associations in the US -- some are more southern than others. I don't subscribe to the notion that Baptist = Southern.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Many Baptists would be stunned to learn that their existence is considered a hallmark of southern culture. That's probably the last thing on their mind. There's over 60 Baptist congregational associations in the US -- some are more southern than others. I don't subscribe to the notion that Baptist = Southern.
But Southern Baptist = Southern and the SBC is the largest Protestant denomination in the country. It seems to be rare for any part of America outside of the South (and some adjacent areas in the Midwest) to be Baptist-dominated according to U.S. religious maps.
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Old 06-20-2018, 01:44 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Many Baptists would be stunned to learn that their existence is considered a hallmark of southern culture. That's probably the last thing on their mind. There's over 60 Baptist congregational associations in the US -- some are more southern than others. I don't subscribe to the notion that Baptist = Southern.

The Southern Baptist church and also the IFB denomination are major drivers of the social conservatism that is a huge part of Southern culture. More than any other Christian denomination, Baptists tend to support laws that enforce their moral code on society. One example is in Oklahoma, beer sold in grocery stores cannot be in excess of 3.2% ABV. Anything stronger has to be sold in liquor stores which have very inconvenient hours and cannot sell anything cold. The state only just recently legalized tattoos in 2006. It's likely 30-50 years away from legal marijuana. The Ozarks in particular is one of the most conservative and one of the most Baptist regions of the entire country.
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Old 06-20-2018, 08:16 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
The Southern Baptist church and also the IFB denomination are major drivers of the social conservatism that is a huge part of Southern culture. More than any other Christian denomination, Baptists tend to support laws that enforce their moral code on society. One example is in Oklahoma, beer sold in grocery stores cannot be in excess of 3.2% ABV. Anything stronger has to be sold in liquor stores which have very inconvenient hours and cannot sell anything cold. The state only just recently legalized tattoos in 2006. It's likely 30-50 years away from legal marijuana. The Ozarks in particular is one of the most conservative and one of the most Baptist regions of the entire country.
Which honestly might attest to the Baptist influence in Missouri being overhyped to a certain degree. Is it the dominant domination in many counties outside of St. Louis and Kansas City, yes, but not dominant enough to overcome the Catholics in those metros.

Missouri's liquor laws are lax, even in comparison to many liberal states, with the exception of its 1:30 am / 3:00 am last call setup.
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Old 08-27-2018, 10:58 PM
 
1,438 posts, read 878,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
Which honestly might attest to the Baptist influence in Missouri being overhyped to a certain degree. Is it the dominant domination in many counties outside of St. Louis and Kansas City, yes, but not dominant enough to overcome the Catholics in those metros.

Missouri's liquor laws are lax, even in comparison to many liberal states, with the exception of its 1:30 am / 3:00 am last call setup.
It wasn't at one time though. At one point most of Missouri's counties were dry counties and it was considered a dry state as well.

Anyway, Missouri does have a number of southern influences and such that is not seen in any of the other midwestern state. Politically it's pretty far to the right on gays, abortion, and gun laws. In fact compared to the other southern states only Mississippi has as lax gun laws as Missouri. All the other southern states require you to have a permit to carry concealed. here in Floriduh our gun laws are VERY strict compared to Missouri. They can be confusing. No open carry, 3 day wait periods, need a ccw permit, 21 to buy a long gun and stricter carry laws.

Also the southern dialect according to the University of PA 1997 study covers about 25 to 30 percent of the state.

On the Missouri forum most agree Missouri is 50 percent Midwestern, 25 percent a transition zone mix like southern IL and southern IN and 25 percent fully southern, the southern quarter of Missouri just north of highway 60 on south. Overall makes the state midwestern but noticeable southern influences.

Anyway, as a native Missourian from St. Louis county I will say overall even though I lived in the St. Louis area it just feels different than the other midwestern states such as IL, IN, OH. The overall southern influence IMO affects the state as a whole even today in regions that are midwestern. It certainly has a bible belt feel to it compared to the other midwestern states. Even north of the MO river outside the transition zone it still just feels a bit different. I don't know how to really explain it but as a whole the state in modern time could still be considered a border state due to these influences mixed into one.


I had a teacher in college from Iowa and he said when you drive into Missouri how the state feels totally different than Iowa.

While over time Missouri has become less southern it still retains some of the past southern influences and traits though.
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Old 08-28-2018, 07:16 AM
 
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Missouri has really lax alcohol laws compared to the Bible Belt.

I've never felt that there's a big difference driving from Iowa to Missouri, so much as there's a fairly noticeable transition as you get south of I-80 in Iowa. I'm from the northern tier of counties in Iowa, a couple miles from the Minnesota border, and I think southern Iowa has more in common with non-Ozark Missouri than it does with northern Iowa. It's a different topography, for sure. Much more rolling hills, and more heavily forested. The soil is less productive, and quite a bit more erosive, and this has lead to a lower level of agricultural productivity and general prosperity over time. I think you saw mining in the past, but that's faded away as well.

Southern Iowa seems more religious than northern Iowa as well, save for the Dutch cluster in NW Iowa.
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