U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 01-04-2009, 06:06 PM
 
149 posts, read 441,408 times
Reputation: 123
The eastern US in general is humid...hot and humid in summer and cold and humid (damp) in winter. What makes the difference between the comfort level in high humidity is temperature. The further north you go the lower the average temperatures. For less humidity you have to go west, the great plains states will have less humidity than the northeast or southeast. Depending on how you define southern, Oklahoma or Missouri might be as close as you can get. But for the most part when you escape the subtropical (humid) climate zone you leave the Southern culture zone as well.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-04-2009, 07:23 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 3,720,094 times
Reputation: 1815
I'm pretty sure Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California are not southern states. Out of the states that are ACTUALLY in the South, I would guess that Kentucky is the least humid. The state. is the farthest away from any significant body of water (Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean). I would also guess that the Ozarks in northwestern Arkansas experience lower humidity than other areas of the South.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2009, 07:41 PM
 
5,231 posts, read 9,237,323 times
Reputation: 2319
Western NC. That's where Floridians go to escape the summer humidity. Not that it's not humid in W NC, but compared to FL, it's the desert!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 03:55 AM
 
18 posts, read 35,385 times
Reputation: 32
Live in Arkansas, Central Arkansas (Little Rock) to be exact and during the summer it does get pretty nasty with the humidity and all.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Ca2Mo2Ga2Va!
2,293 posts, read 3,914,111 times
Reputation: 979
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedudewiththeplan View Post
Northern Georgia is VERY humid! When I lived near Atlanta is was like being in a sauna in the summer!

You know, Georgia's humidity didn't bother me at all, guess I got used to it. When we left socal for sw Missouri, the humidity that first summer was enough to make me want to move back home, but then the next summer it was no big deal really and when we moved to Ga, the humidity never got to me. We didn't move to Va till August but I didn't even feel any humidity here! (I was about an hour east of ATL)
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 10:13 AM
Status: "STL Cards all the way!" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: A Land Not So Far Away
3,486 posts, read 1,353,190 times
Reputation: 4864
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
I'm pretty sure Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California are not southern states. Out of the states that are ACTUALLY in the South, I would guess that Kentucky is the least humid. The state. is the farthest away from any significant body of water (Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean). I would also guess that the Ozarks in northwestern Arkansas experience lower humidity than other areas of the South.

You could say Texas if you get away from the Gulf Coast. That's the trick to this. You'll find areas that have little to no humidity, basically in the west and north.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,947 posts, read 9,028,855 times
Reputation: 4217
Western Arkansas is really where the transition from humid to semi-arid begins. It is signifficantly less humid than most of the South, but still more humid than western Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 10:43 AM
Status: "Back to work!" (set 14 days ago)
 
9,786 posts, read 10,801,270 times
Reputation: 4962
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Western Arkansas is really where the transition from humid to semi-arid begins. It is signifficantly less humid than most of the South, but still more humid than western Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle.
I gotta disagree with you a bit here bchris. I mean, you are right about the far western parts of Texas and Oklahoma, but the real transition from humid to semi-arid doesn't start until one gets into far west Texas. The area where the elevation rises considerably. The eastern two/thirds of Texas are comparatively "low" elevation wise. I posted this link a bit earlier, but want to do so again just to illustrate it a bit:

The Climate of Texas (http://www.met.tamu.edu/osc/TXclimat.htm - broken link)
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 11:21 AM
 
26,251 posts, read 21,358,159 times
Reputation: 7278
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I gotta disagree with you a bit here bchris. I mean, you are right about the far western parts of Texas and Oklahoma, but the real transition from humid to semi-arid doesn't start until one gets into far west Texas. The area where the elevation rises considerably. The eastern two/thirds of Texas are comparatively "low" elevation wise. I posted this link a bit earlier, but want to do so again just to illustrate it a bit:

The Climate of Texas (http://www.met.tamu.edu/osc/TXclimat.htm - broken link)
I used to live in Texas(Dallas-Ft. Worth area) and it never felt very humid, especially in comparison to Atlanta. It could be 100 degrees F, but the heat didn't feel as harsh as Atlanta.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 11:56 AM
Status: "Back to work!" (set 14 days ago)
 
9,786 posts, read 10,801,270 times
Reputation: 4962
Quote:
Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
I used to live in Texas(Dallas-Ft. Worth area) and it never felt very humid, especially in comparison to Atlanta. It could be 100 degrees F, but the heat didn't feel as harsh as Atlanta.
Proximity to the Atlantic or the Gulf counts for quite a bit in terms of how it "feels" (which is subjective, obviously). I live about 100 miles NW of Dallas, and our relative humidity is almost always over 50% even in mid-July. Compared to Houston (or Atlanta) this would be "dry"...but the biggest difference is when one gets out into the steeper elevations of far west Texas.

In fact, this is where that infamous "dry line" of Tornado Alley fame comes into play. That is, during late April thru May, a natural humidity/dewpoint line establishes itself, and is often the focal point for severe weather given the stark contrasts.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top