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Old 01-04-2009, 10:39 PM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,744,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oilpainter View Post
I'm from Los Angeles, and I've always found the extension of new york's CSA to be completely and politically exaggerated. It's all about traffic patterns, not about who actually resides in a particular city. It's a game that statisticians play when it's raining outside and they've got nothing better to do. Just so they can state that Pennsylvania is a suburb of new york city. Silly. new york is not that big, or influential, or all that important- but they want you to believe that. Like a comic book that city is, as well as the people in it. Can't take it, or the whole 'CSA' principle seriously. Where's our money, new york? ...failures...

Well, yes, it is all about traffic patterns. That's a large part of the way the Census Bureau identifies metropolitan areas. A metropolitan area is never about who actually resides in a particular city. By definition, a metro area is a group of cities and towns in proximity to each other which have close economic and social ties. It's not just one city, but the principal city will be the focus of a metro area. Commuting patterns reflect this. The NYC metro extends as far as it does because of the number of people who commute to the core area in NYC's vicinity. All those people commute there because of the large number of jobs in the area, which indicates a high degree of economic activity and complexity. This large number of people commuting long distances does indicate something of NYC's economic importance.
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Old 01-04-2009, 11:53 PM
 
11,973 posts, read 27,654,614 times
Reputation: 4569
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilpainter View Post
I'm from Los Angeles, and I've always found the extension of new york's CSA to be completely and politically exaggerated. It's all about traffic patterns, not about who actually resides in a particular city. It's a game that statisticians play when it's raining outside and they've got nothing better to do. Just so they can state that Pennsylvania is a suburb of new york city. Silly. new york is not that big, or influential, or all that important- but they want you to believe that. Like a comic book that city is, as well as the people in it. Can't take it, or the whole 'CSA' principle seriously. Where's our money, new york? ...failures...
Wow, talk about an inferiority complex! I wonder what kind of car he drives...
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Old 01-05-2009, 01:35 AM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,744,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lookout Kid View Post
Wow, talk about an inferiority complex! I wonder what kind of car he drives...

Well, there's a lot of that going around on General U.S.:
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Old 01-05-2009, 09:16 AM
 
11,182 posts, read 22,407,581 times
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I always thought Atlanta's was huge. 28 counties and a large chunk of the entire state of Georgia.

The population density of the CSA is only 525 per square mile....which is the density of many modest sized areas.
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Old 01-05-2009, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,490 posts, read 16,181,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
Well, yes, it is all about traffic patterns. That's a large part of the way the Census Bureau identifies metropolitan areas. A metropolitan area is never about who actually resides in a particular city. By definition, a metro area is a group of cities and towns in proximity to each other which have close economic and social ties. It's not just one city, but the principal city will be the focus of a metro area. Commuting patterns reflect this. The NYC metro extends as far as it does because of the number of people who commute to the core area in NYC's vicinity. All those people commute there because of the large number of jobs in the area, which indicates a high degree of economic activity and complexity. This large number of people commuting long distances does indicate something of NYC's economic importance.
Your words of reason are useless against him.
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Old 01-05-2009, 07:52 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,887 posts, read 21,170,268 times
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Doesn't Atlanta's now include a couple of Alabama counties?
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Old 01-05-2009, 08:04 PM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,744,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Your words of reason are useless against him.
So be it.

Any thoughts from anyone on what exactly a CSA is, other than the loose idea of a broadly local association between MSA's?
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Old 01-05-2009, 08:17 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX.
1,226 posts, read 2,717,048 times
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One thing that I wish they would do when compiling this information is to separate or devide out percentage wise, and split metro areas into two seperate measures when more than one major city is present (ie: instead of SF-Bay area around 8.1 million seperate it into SF 4.5m, Oakland 1.6m, San Jose 2.om or whatever the calculation came out to, or instead of DFW 6.8m make it Dallas 4.1m, Ft. Worth 2.7m etc...) I just like individualism. Plus It sux when your in a city like Houston where the metro is much larger than that of only what would be divided up for Dallas, and people from Dallas are always talkin about how much bigger the BIG D metro is, without giving Ft. Worth any credit. Also look at what NYC would loose without the Newark and Jersey City areas. I know it's silly, just anoying.
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Old 01-05-2009, 09:47 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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I know that Cle440 is going to say St. Louis, seeing as how he seems to have a grudge against the place
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Old 01-05-2009, 09:47 PM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,744,103 times
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The whole issue gets complicated when you have several large cities in close proximity. TX_Aggie, what you are talking about is the difference between an MSA and a CSA. The traditional idea of a metropolitan area would basically be one city and its suburbs. That is an MSA--metropolitan statistical area. That would be San Francisco and its local suburbs, for example, or San Jose and its suburbs, but not the two together. MSA's are broken down to individual cities and their suburbs, as you suggested. When several MSA's are close enough to each other to have a lot of commuting between them, and to be generally regarded as one broad local region, you get a Consolidated Statistical Area. The Bay Area as a whole is a CSA. I just wonder whether it's possible to come up with a descripton of a CSA that pins down the basic idea as succinctly as describing an MSA as a city and its commuter suburbs.

Last edited by ogre; 01-05-2009 at 10:22 PM..
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