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Old 01-04-2009, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Alpharetta, GA (North Atlanta Metro)
64 posts, read 62,427 times
Reputation: 37

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With a population of around 8,274,527 people squeezed into 304 sq miles NYC is easily the densest major city with 27,147 people per sq miles. But what would be the population of other cities if they had the same density? Find out now.

With 767 sq miles of land Jacksonville would have to have about
20,800,000 people to be as dense as NYC.

With 579.4 sq miles of land Houston would have to have about
15,750,000 people to be as dense as NYC.

With 469 sq miles of land Los Angeles would have to have about 12,750,000 people to be as dense as NYC.

With 227 sq miles of land Chicago would have to have about
6,160,000 people to be as dense as NYC.

With 131 sq miles of land Atlanta would have to have about
2,790,000 people to be as dense as NYC.

With 48.4 sq miles of land Boston would have to have about
1,319,000 people to be as dense of NYC.

With 46.7 sq miles of land San Francisco would have to have about
1,270,000 people to be as dense as NYC.

With 35.6 sq miles of land Miami would have to have about
965,000 people to be as dense as NYC.

I calculated these numbers by taking the land area of these cities and then increasing the population and dividing it by the land area until I could get the closet density possible to NYC. There is probablly a more algebraic method of doing this but oh well algebra has never been my best subject. Enjoy
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Old 01-04-2009, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
133 posts, read 415,615 times
Reputation: 86
Many of NY's suburbs are more dense than some of the cities mentioned on that list. The list of largest cities in the US has lost much of its meaning in recent years due to newer cities incorporating suburbs into their city limits.
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Old 01-04-2009, 08:48 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 30,935,086 times
Reputation: 5190
I posted this once before, but if Texas had the population density of NJ, the entire population of the US would live within its' borders.

I like posts like this!
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Old 01-04-2009, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,896,902 times
Reputation: 8963
Call me crazy, but San Francisco realistically has the best chance to pull that off from your list in the next 20 years. The only thing stopping it is the cost of living.
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Old 01-04-2009, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Alpharetta, GA (North Atlanta Metro)
64 posts, read 62,427 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Call me crazy, but San Francisco realistically has the best chance to pull that off from your list in the next 20 years. The only thing stopping it is the cost of living.
I could see that happening. Jacksonville will never have 20,000,000 people living in the city but cities like SF, Boston, and Miami could acheive this density if they starting building up and lowered their inflated cost of living.
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Old 01-04-2009, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Alpharetta, GA (North Atlanta Metro)
64 posts, read 62,427 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by jawny08 View Post
Many of NY's suburbs are more dense than some of the cities mentioned on that list. The list of largest cities in the US has lost much of its meaning in recent years due to newer cities incorporating suburbs into their city limits.
Agreed Jacksonville's city limits are crazy. Much of the area the city annexed is rural and has trailer parks and livestock.

And I believe Union City, NJ is the densest city in the nation with 52,977 people per sq mile but I didn't include that because it is not a major city.
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Old 01-04-2009, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,268 posts, read 15,501,681 times
Reputation: 5159
Quote:
Originally Posted by tahiti View Post
I posted this once before, but if Texas had the population density of NJ, the entire population of the US would live within its' borders.

I like posts like this!
I also heard somewhere that if New Jersey were as densely populated as New York City, the whole population of the U.S. would fit into it! It's amazing to me that, dense as NJ is, it doesn't have a much higher population than NYC.
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Old 01-04-2009, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Dorchester
2,602 posts, read 4,212,190 times
Reputation: 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Call me crazy, but San Francisco realistically has the best chance to pull that off from your list in the next 20 years. The only thing stopping it is the cost of living.
San Fran would have to wipe out 75% of their housing stock and build highrises in their place for that to happen.

I live in Boston and I would not want to see the pop density shoot up like that. Lots of great neighborhoods with great houses would have to go.
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Old 01-04-2009, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Alpharetta, GA (North Atlanta Metro)
64 posts, read 62,427 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
I also heard somewhere that if New Jersey were as densely populated as New York City, the whole population of the U.S. would fit into it! It's amazing to me that, dense as NJ is, it doesn't have a much higher population than NYC.
It's because NJ is a lot, lot, lot, less dense than NYC. NJ has something like 1,000 people per sq mile while NYC has over 27,000 ppl per sq mile. Even though NJ is considered dense as a state if it were a city it would be much less dense than Los Angeles, Houston, and Atlanta, so its hard to compare state wide density to a city's. Also as you probablly know NJ has a lot of sprawled out suburbs and farmland in Central and Southern NJ which takes away from the bulk of the density that is concentrated in Northern NJ.
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Old 01-04-2009, 09:49 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,810 posts, read 9,368,651 times
Reputation: 6012
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomDot View Post
San Fran would have to wipe out 75% of their housing stock and build highrises in their place for that to happen.

I live in Boston and I would not want to see the pop density shoot up like that. Lots of great neighborhoods with great houses would have to go.
Good point and New York's density comes with a major price. I grew up in Queens and I cannot tell you how many of the old 1 and 2 family houses I seen destroyed to build these horrible brick multifamily houses that they are building since the 80s. There is no historic NY architecture, no stoop, no porch or even a roof line and the entire front yard is a driveway.

I really believe the city does not care how it looks and cares more about developers pockets than it does the quality of life for its residents.
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