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Old 01-04-2009, 09:51 PM
 
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All the talk about TX becoming more like CA has gotten me thinking....

EP, Austin, Houston, Dallas, SA are all more liberal than SD, and L.A. is pretty liberal (about like Austin), but soCal is generally "conservative" especially by California standards, and compared to Bay Area.

Inland Empire is conservative, about like the areas in the Dallas metro outside of Dallas proper (Dallas proper is actually more liberal than L.A., with about 75% going for Kerry in '04). The OC is conservative too.

So which area is more liberal? The combined TX cities or all of SoCal?

Last edited by radiodude84; 01-04-2009 at 10:01 PM..
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Old 01-04-2009, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Actually yes, most major cities (city proper) are more liberal then southern California as a whole (not excluding any city.
In the 2004 election only Los Angeles County and some 2 other smaller county went Democrat, and while all the Texas counties (minus El Paso and Austin) went Republican like OC and San Diego(meaning all but 3 counties went republican) . The Big liberal stronghold in California is the Bay Area, not Southern California which would tend to be more of a battle ground.
El Paso, Austin, and Dallas are very liberal cities (city proper), and Houston and San Antonio to a lesser degree as well. Fort Worth remains pretty conservatives, even regarding minorities.
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Old 01-05-2009, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
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Quote:
So which area is more liberal?
Southern California (even though there are some conservative areas there).
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Old 01-05-2009, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
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Depends on what kind of liberal. Many Hispanics, which make up a large portion of the voters in Southern California as well as Texas cities like El Paso vote Democrat but remain very conservative on issues like gay marriage. For social liberalism, Austin (and Dallas to a lesser degree) is the stronghold in Texas, and the Bay Area is the stronghold in California.
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Old 01-05-2009, 08:38 AM
 
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I remember another thread stating that 75% of Dallas voted for Kerry in the election and how it was more liberal than almost any city in the country.

There was some link with a research paper by a man stating those stats.


Someone finally looked it up though, and Dallas voted for Kerry, but by a total of 57% of the vote....NOT 75%.

Dallas county actually voted for Bush, which makes it one of the only counties in the US to contain a major urban area and still vote for Bush, and the 57% of the people in the city proper voting Democrat is actually quite low compared to most central cities.

There are liberal portions of Texas, and certainly more liberals/democrats than people give it credit for......but at the end of the day it's not going to be winning many contests for liberalism.
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Old 01-05-2009, 08:40 AM
 
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Very good point, radiodude. And in the LA area, you could make the area that Orange County is quite conservative too.
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Old 01-05-2009, 09:31 AM
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Location: Ohio
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I don't know much about the politics of SoCal, but it seems to me that the bar is pretty low for it to exceed Texas in liberalism. Every statewide elective office in Texas state government that is filled by partisan elections is held by conservative Republicans.

OP, I know you thought you were giving yourself wiggle room by specifying "Texas cities," but you have to figure that there were plenty of urban voters who helped elect those statewide officeholders.
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Old 01-05-2009, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMDallas View Post
The Big liberal stronghold in California is the Bay Area, not Southern California which would tend to be more of a battle ground.
I agree. SoCal tends to be more religious with an evangelical fervor. I looked up the congressman's website for Palmdale and Santa Clarita and he was spewing out right-wing talking points like a talk radio host (or John Culberson after winning on Election Night). For a moment, I thought I was back in Texas.

I was also surprised that all the counties surrounding L.A. County were red on the maps. The Antelope Valley and the Santa Clarita Valley would be red if it was separate from L.A. County.
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Old 01-05-2009, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Originally Posted by CMDallas View Post
Fort Worth remains pretty conservatives, even regarding minorities.
And what is this supposed to mean?
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Old 01-05-2009, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,643 posts, read 27,082,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I remember another thread stating that 75% of Dallas voted for Kerry in the election and how it was more liberal than almost any city in the country.

There was some link with a research paper by a man stating those stats.


Someone finally looked it up though, and Dallas voted for Kerry, but by a total of 57% of the vote....NOT 75%.

Dallas county actually voted for Bush, which makes it one of the only counties in the US to contain a major urban area and still vote for Bush, and the 57% of the people in the city proper voting Democrat is actually quite low compared to most central cities.

There are liberal portions of Texas, and certainly more liberals/democrats than people give it credit for......but at the end of the day it's not going to be winning many contests for liberalism.
Anything that basically happened in 2004 is not offset by 2008 now. In 2008, Obama won Dallas County by a pretty wide margin and won the city by a significant margin. Democrats have taken over Dallas County since 2006 and it doesn't look like that will change in the near future.
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