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View Poll Results: If you had to move to the South where would you move?
Charlotte 20 14.39%
Virginia Beach 13 9.35%
Atlanta 10 7.19%
Jacksonville 3 2.16%
Tampa 4 2.88%
Orlando 1 0.72%
Miami 17 12.23%
Nashville 15 10.79%
Memphis 3 2.16%
New Orleans 4 2.88%
Dallas 10 7.19%
Houston 16 11.51%
San Antonio 4 2.88%
Austin 19 13.67%
Voters: 139. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-09-2009, 12:25 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
48,186 posts, read 45,495,400 times
Reputation: 15339

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I dont' know if you consider the Baltimore "the north" but here there's almost no public transport (few people use the one-line subway or the light rail), nothing is open 24 hours, liquor stores close at 5PM (to prevent drunks from the ghetto from going there and hanging out) and the pace of life is not very hectic and people are very friendly. This place is interesting, in some of Baltimore's blue collar suburbs its so laid back and people are so friendly (they regularly call you "hon" or "sweetie" and say sir and ma'am) but then you go to Denny's and there's no sweet tea the way Denny's.
Doing that wouldn't work. If someone wants alcohol and to mill about doing nothing, then someone will find a way.

I wouldn't never imagine Baltimore as that laid back. I imagine it was more like Philadelphia or St. Louis.

BTW, I have a hard time considering Baltimore as the South, at least culturally.

 
Old 01-09-2009, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Omaha
2,716 posts, read 6,216,021 times
Reputation: 1221
Quote:
Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
Doing that wouldn't work. If someone wants alcohol and to mill about doing nothing, then someone will find a way.

I wouldn't never imagine Baltimore as that laid back. I imagine it was more like Philadelphia or St. Louis.

BTW, I have a hard time considering Baltimore as the South, at least culturally.
I agree. To me, the south usually starts in Virginia.
 
Old 01-09-2009, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,341 posts, read 14,102,864 times
Reputation: 5959
If it is not too late to jump in here...........if I HAD to move to the south; I would move to Nashville followed by Houston; so I can still go to at least one Colts game a year.
 
Old 01-09-2009, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,566,974 times
Reputation: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC 38 View Post
If it is not too late to jump in here...........if I HAD to move to the south; I would move to Nashville followed by Houston; so I can still go to at least one Colts game a year.
It's never too late.
 
Old 01-09-2009, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,566,974 times
Reputation: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I dont' know if you consider the Baltimore "the north" but here there's almost no public transport (few people use the one-line subway or the light rail), nothing is open 24 hours, liquor stores close at 5PM (to prevent drunks from the ghetto from going there and hanging out) and the pace of life is not very hectic and people are very friendly. This place is interesting, in some of Baltimore's blue collar suburbs its so laid back and people are so friendly (they regularly call you "hon" or "sweetie" and say sir and ma'am) but then you go to Denny's and there's no sweet tea the way Denny's.
Yes, I undoubtedly consider Baltimore to be a Northern city.
 
Old 01-09-2009, 03:48 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,971,762 times
Reputation: 1661
Default Let me chime in as her Mom

Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
Here's what Rachael wrote on PAGE 6:

I would want to be able to be within close driving distance to the best gyros you'll ever taste (the neighborhood I live in has the highest number of greeks outside of Greece), have my choice of 5 different European supermarkets within 2 miles, have 5 different ethnic foods within one block, get extremely cheap/good sushi (not to mention 6 sushi restaurants within about 7 blocks) at any time of the day, and not to mention the tastiest bagels and pizza. Sorry, can't get all those within one neighborhood anywhere down south.

You responded with:

Change the 5 European supermarkets to Asian/Hindi/Ethiopian, shorten the distance from 2 miles to 1/2 a mile, throw in some of the best Vietnamese you ever dreamed of and you have just described my neighborhood.
Provincialism isn't pretty.

So, in Rachael's neighborhood we have probably a very large number of Greek restaurants (which we'll define as X), 5 more ethnic restaurants in one block, 6 sushi restaurants in 7 blocks, and 5 European supermarkets in 2miles. And you respond that having 5 Asian/Hindi/Ethiopian and some good Vietnamese within 1/2 mile is comparable? It seems to me that you are being argumentative. [(1/4)5 + 5+ 6+x] = 12.25+X vs. 5+X. My guess is that 12.25 + X is bigger. My estimate then is that your neighborhood is only 41% of hers. While she may be wrong that there aren't neighborhoods like that in the South, I still think she is simply arguing that her neighborhood is the norm in NYC...something that you don't find in the South. Then she gets criticized for dismissing your faulty comparison.
First of all, Rachael lives in Queens. Yes, it is a borough of NYC, but it is NOT Manhattan. Anything that she says about Queens, you can DOUBLE it for Manhattan. I am sure even she would agree with that.

Rachael was born in Queens, but we moved to LI when she was not quite 3 years ago. I, myself, spent the first 26 years of my life in Manhattan. My Mom lived there until she died. I took both my daughters into Manhattan all the time, not just to see their Grandma, but to experience what real "diversity" in life and culture was like, as opposed to LI. Although I loved LI (lived there 20 years), there is no place like MANHATTAN. Notice that I did not say NYC. When the vast majority of people speak of NYC, they are actually speaking about Manhattan, not the other 4 boroughs. We did live in Queens for 10 years. I really did not like Queens at all. For me, it was all of the negatives of Manhattan, without any of the positives.

To get back to the opinion about the South, and these are MY opinions, actually living in South Florida (GULF coast), if you can really even consider it to be the "south". I agree with her about the cuisine and getting anything you want at any time of the day or night. As I said before, DOUBLE what she said for Manhattan.

When I was a single, 20 something living in Manhattan, I had 2 very good friends from a small town (Columbia) in Tennessee. Is that the South? I would think so. The young woman came to NYC to escape the small town south and try to become an artist. The young man was gay. He left because he was harassed in his small town south. He came to NYC to find like minded "friends" and a tolerant society. He also wanted to break into music. Neither of them were able to make in NY and went back home eventually.

Yes, I know these are only two individual people, but they are very typical of people who come to NYC from the south. The streets are paved with gold and they have stars in their eyes. Then comes the reality. A whole lot of dreams are crashed. It is very difficult, even more so now, for a native to make it. Double that for a "transplant".

Anyway, I was very good friends with them. The woman was even one of my bridesmaides. Just a few observations. To meet either of them, you would think butter wouldn't melt. They both were such sweet talkers to anybody they ever met; in FRONT of their faces, that is. Once the person left? WOW. Those same buttery tongues could really lash out behind these peoples backs. I have found that to be very, very true for southerners, especially since living in Florida (NATIVES I know). This is a MAJOR difference between the south and north, particularly what is know as "NY attitude". There are no pretenses. We tend to say exactly what we mean and let the chips fall where they may. You will know exactly what a New Yorker is thinking. I used to say to my friends from Tenneesee all the time, "SAY what you MEAN". "Don't SUGARCOAT anything to me, or anybody else here." People here won't believe you, or TRUST you. That is the truth. I still feel that way 30+ years later and more so living here. I even said that to a neighbor of mine in Florida once. "Tell the damned woman how you really feel". "Stop sweet talking her". She looked at me like I had two heads.

I know some of you say you feel my daughter has the right to her opinion, but it is the way she said it that you object to. Well, that is the way we speak. We don't sugarcoat things. You may call that rude, and you are entitled to your opinion, but we are entitled to our opinion also.

As I said before, I don't want to live in South Florida for many, many reasons. The weather is the number one reason, but it is the "whole bag" so to speak.
 
Old 01-09-2009, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,566,974 times
Reputation: 843
^ Very, very interesting. Mother and daughter tag-team.
 
Old 01-09-2009, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,242,279 times
Reputation: 1819
LOL...well she was just adding to what i was saying. She said what I found to be difficult to put in words.
 
Old 01-09-2009, 05:14 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,331,660 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Likewise with South Florida and South Carolina the risk of hurricanes is great and even if my house is not destroyed I would not like to evacuate for a week every year or every 2 years even.
Inland South Carolina (e.g., Columbia, Greenville is pretty well shielded from hurricanes. That section of the state doesn't get as much attention as the coast, but they offer a charm of their own.
 
Old 01-09-2009, 08:24 PM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,868,107 times
Reputation: 1668
I've never lived in the south, but I've always thought that Charlotte or Virginia Beach looked like nice places. If I were required to make the jump, I'd probably head that direction.
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