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Old 01-08-2009, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
142 posts, read 314,082 times
Reputation: 112

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what about basements ?

Most houses up here in New England have basements and many have been converted to family rooms, game rooms and of course many simply smell funny and become a place to store stuff.

I know many other parts of the country have no basements in their homes.
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Old 01-08-2009, 10:58 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,452,346 times
Reputation: 2125
Northern NM style house---
stucco or adobe with pitched tin roof


http://cdn-8.eneighborhoods.com/c1/2428/806229.jpg (broken link)

Adobe houses
http://cdn-8.eneighborhoods.com/c1/2428/801920.jpg (broken link)

http://cdn-8.eneighborhoods.com/c1/2428/801513.jpg (broken link)

Albuquerque area newer homes
http://cdn-0.eneighborhoods.com/c1/2420/629939_1.jpg (broken link)

http://cdn-0.eneighborhoods.com/c1/2420/631207_1.jpg (broken link)

Eastern NM houses
http://cdn-8.eneighborhoods.com/c1/648/ranm20105153.jpg (broken link)

http://cdn-8.eneighborhoods.com/c1/648/ranm20096552.jpg (broken link)

Southern NM houses
http://cdn-8.eneighborhoods.com/c1/2418/lascruces805437.jpg (broken link)

http://cdn-8.eneighborhoods.com/c1/2418/lascruces805249.jpg (broken link)
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Old 01-08-2009, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
1,576 posts, read 5,135,417 times
Reputation: 683
The Country started in the east.. And the west really didnt get too much population growth until about the early 1900s, and it still wasn't that much at a time.

New York stacked houses upon houses during the 20s and 30s due to the booming population growth spreading into the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens.
Later in the 30s and 40s Houses again were being stacked into North East Jersey.


This is how it was for all the big cities and its metros in the east during about the same time period.. WW1

And at the same time, not too many people had big bucks, so the style of most homes created were original and common on many streets
like this (on google map street view)
NY
http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&q=...82408793311557
NJ
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=e...24421538829505


But for me personally, i like the east houses because the houses have more character than most to all the moders homes out west. You dont get that same variety out west like in the east. I mean, in the east you can find SO many of those close together multi family built in the 30s that are still nice, but also get the big spacious modern homes also.

Last edited by Newarkbomb; 01-08-2009 at 11:53 PM..
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Old 01-08-2009, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,564,868 times
Reputation: 843
I'll take the East thank you very much.

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Old 01-09-2009, 01:50 AM
 
Location: SEA/HNL/OC
86 posts, read 308,646 times
Reputation: 54
i like the housing style on the west coast. i like the newer models that are in developments in places such as ladera ranch, california [where my family has a house] and lakeland hills, washington and sun city west, arizona.

comparing east and west, due to the tropical locations, south florida and hawaii have basically the same style of houses.
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Old 01-09-2009, 05:30 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
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Memphis has some nice older (or older looking) houses:






I guess they would fall under East Coast style. West Coast houses have no charm IMO. Maybe it has to do w/ the lack of greenery and big trees in the yards.
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Old 01-09-2009, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Dorchester
2,602 posts, read 4,318,635 times
Reputation: 1082
The only houses in the New England area that don't have eaves are the Cape Cod and colonial Saltbox styles.
This feature came about out of necessity. Fewer overhangs equal fewer places on the house where the winds of a Nor'Easter can find purchase and tear the roof off.
The house of the east is more interesting to me. Carved oak, turrets, hardwood floors, etc.
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Old 01-09-2009, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,232,834 times
Reputation: 1819
I told my fiance that when we buy a house, someday I'd like to change the roof to that italian tiled roofing that's out west. It would look pretty out of place here though It would look especially out of place since we're probably going to buy one of those famous Levitt houses
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:02 AM
 
1,992 posts, read 6,033,497 times
Reputation: 805
Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
I'll take the East thank you very much.
How about suburban style developments from the east, instead of urban rowhomes, for a more apples to apples comparisons. I like the dense eastern rowhomes as much as the next guy, but it's not really a good comparison.
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:11 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,756,657 times
Reputation: 5220
I remember when ET came out, I always wondered how people could find their home if they were drunk (yes, my teenaged mind thought that) - everything looked exactly the same!!!

I'm fascinated with west coast style (spanish, adobe, villa) only because you don't see it here. I would love to live in one to see how I like it, although the "sameness" I think would wear on me after awhile (I'm talking about an average middle class newer neighborhood). Although I have to say I don't understand why, in Phoenix for instance, the houses match the landscape (brown). In Sedona, it's red.

I also love East Coast style. Even in McMansion developments, the styles aren't *exactly* the same, where, stumbling home drunk one night , you wouldn't know where you live. A HUGE plus of typical East Coast style is basements, although devs in suburban Denver have them.
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