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Old 01-10-2009, 08:42 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
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I greatly prefer East Coast style architecture. I love the older houses with history and character. I think they have stories to tell. I live in one of my city's oldest neighborhoods. Unfortunately, not many people appreciate the older housing stock here. They want BIG SHINY NEW these days.
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Old 01-11-2009, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,669,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
I love houses here in the east, but what I like about houses out west, like in Las Vegas and southern CA, is the newer look of them. This is what I mean:


I can't until I can take my nice NYC department of ed pension and move out west and buy one of these houses That's if I have the guts to leave metro NYC
The only real difference between the house in the picture you posted and the house in this listing:
Painesville Township Real Estate - 691 OUTRIGGER DR, Painesville Township, OH 44077 home for sale - Cutler Real Estate
is the regional styling. "Your" house is spanish or mediteranean style, (not really modern, though) and the house I posted is typical midwest.
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Old 01-11-2009, 09:25 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,136,223 times
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There is some interesting reading and pictures on this thread, but just wondering what is the "dividing line" between East and West? Or is it just ones personal definition on that score?

In terms of "whole states" I always put it at the eastern border of Texas and running up to the Canada. That is, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska and the Dakotas being "West", with Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri Iowa and Minnesota being "East". On the other hand, the Mississippi River is often considered the boundary...

Just curious!
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Old 01-11-2009, 09:33 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,883 posts, read 7,328,476 times
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No one builds with unreinforced masonry (brick) in California because in an earthquake brick is the single worst building material and most likely to fall down killing everyone inside. To compare buildings made of wood or even steel reinforced concrete tend to sway during an earthquake and thus desipate the energy of the earthquake. There are many buildings in California with a brick veneer but they are just decoration on the building and not any form of structural support.
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Old 01-11-2009, 09:42 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,883 posts, read 7,328,476 times
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This would be an example of your average home built in Southern California over the last quarter century. It would be a wood structure (stands up better to earthquakes), covered in stucco, with a Spanish tile roof (resists fire caused by burning ash falling on the roof and is more durable). I would say the majority still have a traditional lawn but, as in this picture, many people are opting for less water intensive landscape as it saves both money and a precious resource (water).

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Old 01-11-2009, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
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^I loooooove the way that house looks I think these styles are much prettier than out east here.
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,367,851 times
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One thing nobody has mentioned is window screens, which are universal in the east, but rare in the west, where there are fewer troublesome flying insects.

Almost all characteristics of traditional house design are climate-driven. Eaves for example, may or may not be necessary, according to the amount of rainfall, the frequency of the rain, the composition of the soil around the foundation, and whether or not the house has a basement.

The size of windows, the method of opening them, the structure of the casements, all depend on the sun, the wind, the temperature.

Older houses always have a thicker roof, because when roof repairs are needed, you simply nail a new layer of shingles in place, without the added expense of removing the old ones. Over time, the roof keeps getting thicker. Most roof structures are capable of tolerating the wright of about 4 or 5 layers of shingles, which can take 50-100 years.
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,574 posts, read 1,355,769 times
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Houses in the West have always been more attractive me personally. I love the spanish style of the SW, but also the modern style of anywhere in the West.

I agree with the eve issue your bring up. When the roof just drops off at the outside wall of the house that always looks kinda stupid to me. I much prefer a foot or two overhang. It also just seems more functional to me. If it's raining outside you can still have your windows open with a two foot overhang.

I too love the clay tiles on the roof. You certainly don't see them back east. Even in the Midwest where I live you see a few of them though not many.

I would say you see way more two story homes in the east compared to the west. In the west if your lot is very small you'll see two stories, but a much larger percentage are one story compared to the east. I can't see any advantage to two stories other than added excercise running up and down stairs all day long.

We've lived in both two story and one story homes over the years and there is no comparison as far as functionality and convenience is concerned....one story hands down.
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:16 AM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,334,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper1372 View Post

I too love the clay tiles on the roof. You certainly don't see them back east. Even in the Midwest where I live you see a few of them though not many.
That's not true. There are a few houses around here with clay tiles believe it or not.
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Midwest America
194 posts, read 876,688 times
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What about SW'ern architecture? New Mexico has some very attractive homes built in the adobe style. They are very non-traditional in appearance and usually have very high ceilings, large open floor plans and IMHO are quite cozy. Places like Santa Fe and Rio Rancho have some beautiful examples. Of course you have to be willing to spend at least $500k+ to get a decent one. I just love the sheer "openness" of the entire layout. No need to feel squished or compromised of any kind of space. Good for people who like to breathe. No matter how big the home is, it still retains a down-to-earth vibe. Very homey, very unpretentious. I do not like pretentious, pompous architecture like colonial plantation homes with big doric columns. Makes me think of all the slaves that worked to keep up the place and the proud slave-owners who lived there and profited off the slaves' hard work. Hmmh!
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