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Old 01-14-2009, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
43,858 posts, read 44,592,715 times
Reputation: 58621

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You know you've lived in the sheltered south too long when you have NO IDEA what the 'Rust Belt' even was. I had to read the thread.

I agree with the posters who think people stay in places regardless of economy because it is their home. I really respect people who love their home spot and are determined to make a go of it even when the rest of the world thinks they should move on. They are like reverse pioneers.
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Old 01-14-2009, 03:44 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,322,731 times
Reputation: 2698
The Rustbelt is cool, and it's coming back. If I had the money, I'd be snapping up property in Detroit, Youngstown, Cleveland, etc.
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,323 posts, read 9,567,416 times
Reputation: 1512
You wouldn't believe the number of out of town people buying homes in Warren/Youngstown.....unfortunately, many of them are just slum lords.
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Old 01-14-2009, 06:56 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Answers View Post
I hate that argument. It's not a natural law that cities will, inevitably, suck one day. The reason the rust belt is so rusty today is that it never adapted to a new, global economy. It got suckered by the unions and narrow-minded leaders in the cities and never did what the Chicagos and Columbuses did by diversifying their economies and becoming attractive to educated, upwardly mobile young people.

The southern and western boom towns will continue to boom as long as they continue doing what made them popular in the first place: low taxes, diverse economy, affordable housing, openness to business, good schools, etc. The very things that made the sunbelt so great are the things that will prevent them from becoming another Detroit or Cleveland.
That's not the point. The point is, all the rust-belt cities were once new, too. No city sprang up out of the ground fully developed with 100 year old buildings. Every building was once new.

Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
There are many once you get outside the city of Pittsburgh. The same can not be said for a city like Charlotte. I have to disagree that there are unique things built today. Most construction now a days is low quality cookie cutter garbage.
I have posted this about a dozen times on these urban/suburban threads. Go look at the housing in the older parts of any city. Go look at the pictures here on CD. Except in the neighborhoods of old historic mansions, the housing looks the same. These houses have acquired a patina of "charm" b/c they are old. They don't all look exacatly alike any more, b/c they have had additions built, paint colors changed, landscaping put in, etc. But they're all very similiar. 4 or so styles of homes in a neighborhood, for the most part.
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Old 01-14-2009, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,564,868 times
Reputation: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That's not the point. The point is, all the rust-belt cities were once new, too. No city sprang up out of the ground fully developed with 100 year old buildings. Every building was once new.
I don't think anyone is saying, "these buildings are good simply because they are old." I think the idea is that 100 years ago they beautifully crafted buildings; very little was junk.
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Old 01-14-2009, 07:13 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
I don't think anyone is saying, "these buildings are good simply because they are old." I think the idea is that 100 years ago they beautifully crafted buildings; very little was junk.
Yes, well, that's not what I meant. What I meant was that every old building was once new. As for 100 yr old buildings being better-built than those of today, that's debatable. There was a lot of junk built back then, too. Those old houses have virtually NO insulation in them, single pane windows, etc. I grew up in one. My brother's room did not even have a register for heat. My parents had to install an electric heater in it. The kitchen had no place for a refrigerator b/c there were no refrigerators when it was built.
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Old 01-14-2009, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Real America
281 posts, read 539,914 times
Reputation: 167
Architecturally speaking, structures were more unique back then. Developers, retailers, home builders don't care about architectural sature anymore. It is all about what is the cheapest and buildings are only built for the short term. There are still buildings that are built quality these days. The new fad is green buildings. I live in a old building and I don't have a ground on my receptacles. I have only 1 cable jack drilled in one section of my living room, and I have old radiators. SO, technically my building is behind the times. However, the facade is made out of old stones, and it is architecturally cool.

Buildings like old department stores located in different cities downtowns will never be built again. Now days it is cheaply built Walmarts and targets. Those buildings don't have any architectural substance at all.
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Old 01-14-2009, 07:38 PM
 
464 posts, read 969,928 times
Reputation: 123
I can't wait for Detroit to make its come back.

The Midwest of the United States is kind of the person backstage. They make everything work, but get no recognition for it. Midwestern cities are some of the best in the nation. You have Chicago, which is a great city by itself, even though it isn't really a Rustbelt city at all, Detroit, the city of the car, Minneapolis is great, etc.

When Detroit makes it comeback, the American Midwest will be even more amazing.
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Old 01-14-2009, 07:47 PM
 
3,234 posts, read 7,627,024 times
Reputation: 2694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That's not the point. The point is, all the rust-belt cities were once new, too. No city sprang up out of the ground fully developed with 100 year old buildings. Every building was once new.



I have posted this about a dozen times on these urban/suburban threads. Go look at the housing in the older parts of any city. Go look at the pictures here on CD. Except in the neighborhoods of old historic mansions, the housing looks the same. These houses have acquired a patina of "charm" b/c they are old. They don't all look exacatly alike any more, b/c they have had additions built, paint colors changed, landscaping put in, etc. But they're all very similiar. 4 or so styles of homes in a neighborhood, for the most part.

Regardless of how they got their charm, they still got it. The newer neighborhoods don't have this. And the older styles paid more attention to detail, making them better looking IMO. The housing does not look the same in many of these older neighborhoods. Not by a long shot.
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Old 01-14-2009, 07:49 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,130 posts, read 9,899,963 times
Reputation: 6423
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrestViewdrive View Post
Architecturally speaking, structures were more unique back then. Developers, retailers, home builders don't care about architectural sature anymore. It is all about what is the cheapest and buildings are only built for the short term. There are still buildings that are built quality these days. The new fad is green buildings. I live in a old building and I don't have a ground on my receptacles. I have only 1 cable jack drilled in one section of my living room, and I have old radiators. SO, technically my building is behind the times. However, the facade is made out of old stones, and it is architecturally cool.

Buildings like old department stores located in different cities downtowns will never be built again. Now days it is cheaply built Walmarts and targets. Those buildings don't have any architectural substance at all.
Agreed.

All over the outer boroughs of NY for the last few decades they have been tearing down the historic single and two family houses - brownstones in Brooklyn, Victorians in Queens, rowhouses in the Bronx. In their place they have been building these ugly plain pinkish brick multi-family buildings. There is nothing New York or traditional about them - no stoops, porches, rooflines or detailing. The front garden is a carpark.

Its obviously alot cheaper for the builder. A shame because we will be stuck with them for many years. They get away with it because for some time now people are just glad to get a house.
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