U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-08-2009, 08:02 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,037 posts, read 102,723,474 times
Reputation: 33084

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I just read that Pittsburgh's problems also have to do with people there, who seem to be a bit unpleasant according to that poster.
Revenge of the Rust Belt - Economix Blog - NYTimes.com
If the poster says the truth, is that a general trait of people in the Rust Belt or is it limited to Pittsburgh, for whatever reason?
LOL, I read the comments and I found them interesting and typical of many Pittsburghers. I am from Pittsburgh, grew up there in the 50s and 60s when steel was in its heyday and then its early decline. I spent my formative years hearing my parents, particularly my father, say the same types of things: "Just wait, it's going to implode on them in (insert name of sunbelt city/state here)".

It is also true that the NYT has published several travel articles about Pittsburgh, which make it sound like Shangri-La on the Three Rivers. They talk about its "Renaissance" (a Pittsburgh term for urban renewal even when I was a kid) like it is complete.

People have moved out to the burbs, but what those bloggers don't tell you is that the metro area continues to decline as well. Considering that the population of the US has doubled since about 1950, Pittsburgh should be at about 4 million people if it had kept up just with the population growth rate. People like to "spin" the population issue, too. One comment lamented the population of Allegheny County as a whole was not included, unlike in Philadelphia (Philadelphia County is apparently entirely within the Philly city limits). Generaly, they blame western cities for their annexation policies, which may actually be true of Phoenix, but is not true of many western cities, including Denver.

Population since 1970, metro area:

http://recenter.tamu.edu/data/popm/pm6280.htm
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-08-2009, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,002,635 times
Reputation: 25890
Thank God not everyone wants to flee to the East-West coasts!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2009, 01:12 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,526 posts, read 19,354,061 times
Reputation: 8552
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
LOL, I read the comments and I found them interesting and typical of many Pittsburghers. I am from Pittsburgh, grew up there in the 50s and 60s when steel was in its heyday and then its early decline. I spent my formative years hearing my parents, particularly my father, say the same types of things: "Just wait, it's going to implode on them in (insert name of sunbelt city/state here)".

It is also true that the NYT has published several travel articles about Pittsburgh, which make it sound like Shangri-La on the Three Rivers. They talk about its "Renaissance" (a Pittsburgh term for urban renewal even when I was a kid) like it is complete.

People have moved out to the burbs, but what those bloggers don't tell you is that the metro area continues to decline as well. Considering that the population of the US has doubled since about 1950, Pittsburgh should be at about 4 million people if it had kept up just with the population growth rate. People like to "spin" the population issue, too. One comment lamented the population of Allegheny County as a whole was not included, unlike in Philadelphia (Philadelphia County is apparently entirely within the Philly city limits). Generaly, they blame western cities for their annexation policies, which may actually be true of Phoenix, but is not true of many western cities, including Denver.

Population since 1970, metro area:

Pittsburgh, PA MSA Population and Components of Change
But foreigners seem to like it, international immigrants are probably the only ones moving there, but who knows how long they stay...

What I was referring to originally was these remarks:

"Pittsburgh could be a nice place to live, but its local culture is so intensely hostile to the young, the single, the highly educated, and newcomers, that it is likely to remain in a state of social, cultural, and population decline."
...
I experienced this severe negativity, this civic inferiority complex, firsthand. I used to live and work in Pittsburgh. I wanted to like the city, but could not get it to like me back. I fled Pittsburgh for London a few years ago, where I have a great job, wonderful friends, and none of the severe interpersonal problems that Pittsburgh posed me on a near-daily basis both at work and around my home."

That sounds rather harsh, I hope it does not apply to Cincinnati people as well
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2009, 01:52 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,037 posts, read 102,723,474 times
Reputation: 33084
Regarding international immigration:

18,874 residents are foreign born (2.4% Asia, 2.2% Europe, 0.6% Latin America).

This city: 5.6%
Pennsylvania: 4.1%

From City-Data

Way different from say, Minneapolis (to pick one out of the hat):

55,475 residents are foreign born (4.8% Latin America, 4.5% Asia, 3.3% Africa).

This city: 14.5%
Minnesota: 5.3%

Also from CD.

I figured you were referring to that comment. I have heard that, and more. There are people on the Pittsburgh forum who would feircely disagree with that assessment. They would say there's something wrong with that person, even though than s/he was successful in London. To be fair, there are people on the Pittsburgh forum who have moved there and like it. So there's always more than one opinion.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 02-08-2009 at 01:57 PM.. Reason: Add a comparison
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2010, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,821,471 times
Reputation: 4047
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Because its their HOME, most people still live where they grew up usually for family and familiarity. No matter how crappy a place can be it is still HOME no matter what for many and you just cannot replicate that no matter where you go, home is where the heart is. I love where I live now but I miss my family and childhood friends a lot and that will likely cause me to move back home eventually even though as a place, I prefer living in San Diego over the Bay Area but this area will never be my "true home" b/c I am not rooted here like I am in the Bay Area.

Not everyone is going to flee b/c of a bad economy,many will do fine and others will do what they have to do. It may be bad overall but there are still plenty of people with jobs making a living there and doing just fine. Maybe its b/c we are on a relocation web site but not as many people pick up and move away from their original homes forever as some might think.

That's exactly what I was thinking minus the Bay Area and San Deigo part. I'm not from there lol. For me it would be Chicago/Houston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2010, 01:09 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,346,516 times
Reputation: 2698
Why don't people abandon any region that has been hurting for so long? Because it's home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2010, 02:22 PM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
822 posts, read 1,256,504 times
Reputation: 757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Why don't people abandon any region that has been hurting for so long? Because it's home.
Great answer!

I turned down a job offer down south mainly because I didn't want to be far from family. I am still straddling the fence about moving. It would mean better pay and benefits though and probably a newer house and certainly less snow.

Yeah I know my hometown of Clarksburg and my current region of Greater Pittsburgh isn't the most best looking place, but it's home. Once I leave the area even for a week, I start missing it. Then I complain about it when I come back.

Also my Italian grandmother doesn't approve of me moving down there!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2010, 10:08 PM
 
Location: ☀ ѕυnѕнιne ѕтaтe ☀
1,417 posts, read 2,797,237 times
Reputation: 244
Yeah it's home like dude said. I wouldn't dare abandon Orlando/Tampa no matter what happened. Roots are here. I mean and now days it's not easy to up and leave when life is established in one place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2010, 10:13 PM
 
Location: NOVA
316 posts, read 558,975 times
Reputation: 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLABoyJ View Post
Yeah it's home like dude said. I wouldn't dare abandon Orlando/Tampa no matter what happened. Roots are here. I mean and now days it's not easy to up and leave when life is established in one place.
I agree with you 100 percent, its not easy to bounce up and say that you are going to move cross country, especially in today's time. The only way that can be done is if you have a job already in place in the city that you are moving too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2010, 01:16 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,988,164 times
Reputation: 14678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Answers View Post
Actually, the irony is that that's not happening at all. Cities like Cleveland, Detroit and Pittsburgh continue to lose people, businesses, and opportunities to vibrant southern and western cities.
I can't speak for the other two, but Pittsburgh now has positive net domestic migration, and the overwhelming majority who have left Pittsburgh since 2000 have moved to Heaven or Hell, not Atlanta or Dallas. Pittsburgh has an elderly population befitting a metropolitan area of ~3,000,000 people, and a non-elderly population befitting a metropolitan area of ~2,000,000 people. (This is a direct result of the steel industry collapse during the late 1970's and early 1980's.) The elderly slice of the metropolitan area is shrinking faster than the younger slice is growing, hence the population loss. There are job opportunities to be had in Pittsburgh regardless.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Answers View Post
Instead of doing exactly what you're suggesting, the leadership in these cities are circling the wagons around the unions, public schools, and traditional black identity politics keeping the rust best from dusting itself off and entering the 21st Century.
People from Chicago ought to be the last people in the universe to criticize any other city's political functions, considering their city's machine has been exposed to everybody in the last two years. With that said, you're not even right about Pittsburgh, which doesn't cater to "black identity" politics at all (and probably gets labeled "racist" because of it). Sure, the city's pension plan is still a big fat mess, but independent of that, the operating budget has been in the black since 2004, and the government has downsized.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Answers View Post
Why do people stay? Family, familiarity, lack of education or job prospects, and the unbeatable feeling of being home no matter how crappy home might be.
Or having found a nice job.

By the way, I'd rather be happy in an old fixer-upper that I bought for $96K than miserable in a $136K McMansion that I bought for $272K.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top