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Old 07-14-2012, 06:29 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,918,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceisforAce View Post
Syracuse is 10x more provincial than say, Phoenix or Denver though. How in the world you can dispute that, well, go ahead.
That's true.

Cities that are small and have little/no net-migration tend to be quite provincial.

That's not necessarily a bad thing, depending on the person. Different strokes for different folks.
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Old 07-14-2012, 06:37 PM
 
56,875 posts, read 81,192,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
I didn't feel it where I lived at all. One neighborhood I lived, there was an internist, podiatrist, city manager, postal worker, retired phone company, retired something else, a paramedic, etc., all in 1 block. All types of folks. Everyone mixed okay, as much as the West mixes. I'm not talking LA here, but I did not feel the classism that I feel in the East. I don't feel people in the West are "in your face" about anything. That's not the Western MO. The Western way is to evade, not discuss and avoid confrontation at all costs!
You can find that out here too. On my block, there's a postal worker, an architect, a restaurant manager, a former public school aide, a school administrator at a school, a campus security officer and aperson that works at a bakery, along with retired folks. People speak to each other and get along. This is in a working to middle class first ring suburb too.
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Old 07-14-2012, 06:37 PM
 
5,559 posts, read 7,002,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
No.

The population simply shifted from places like Mack & Chalmers or Harper & Van Dyke to 15 Mile and Orchard Lake and 23 Mile and Van Dyke.

Areas around Mack & Chalmers and Harper & Van Dyke are still populated but maybe not with the type of neighbors you would like.

Did it occur to you that maybe residents from other parts of Michigan may have moved to the Detroit metro area in the past 40+ years?
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Old 07-14-2012, 06:43 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,918,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Areas around Mack & Chalmers and Harper & Van Dyke are still populated but maybe not with the type of neighbors you would like
Have you seen Google Images of that area? What's your definition of "populated?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Did it occur to you that maybe residents from other parts of Michigan may have moved to the Detroit metro area in the past 40+ years?
The numbers speak for themselves sir.

Detroit is no bigger than it was in 1960 (see the numbers I posted before), unless you want to dispute a measely few hundred thousand people.
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Old 07-14-2012, 06:44 PM
 
56,875 posts, read 81,192,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
That's true.

Cities that are small and have little/no net-migration tend to be quite provincial.

That's not necessarily a bad thing, depending on the person. Different strokes for different folks.
It depends if the area is transient to a degree due to certain industries. Not all smaller areas are the same. For instance, the smaller city in question has a world class university and a higher percentage of people with a higher education degree than Phoenix. So, the comparison isn't as clear cut as one may think it is.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 07-14-2012 at 07:05 PM..
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Old 07-14-2012, 07:24 PM
 
313 posts, read 287,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
That's true.

Cities that are small and have little/no net-migration tend to be quite provincial.

That's not necessarily a bad thing, depending on the person. Different strokes for different folks.

Bingo. Especially much older communities and towns in the Northeast compared to the West.
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Old 07-14-2012, 07:25 PM
 
313 posts, read 287,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
It depends if the area is transient to a degree due to certain industries. Not all smaller areas are the same. For instance, the smaller city in question has a world class university and a higher percentage of people with a higher education degree than Phoenix. So, the comparison isn't as clear cut as one may think it is.

I know many people in Syracuse and all around (had a ton of friends that went to Oswego, etc.), and ive been there a million times. Its also very Italian like Utica. Its very provincial.
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:04 PM
 
56,875 posts, read 81,192,796 times
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[quote=SpaceisforAce;25172827]I know many people in Syracuse and all around (had a ton of friends that went to Oswego, etc.), and ive been there a million times. Its also very Italian like Utica. It is very provincial.

It is more of an Irish metro, actually. Ask people in the area about Salt Potatoes, the Tipperary Hill neighborhood, Westvale, what was the background of many of the people that built the Erie Canal and more, and it would make more sense. It also has big German population too.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 07-14-2012 at 08:27 PM..
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:12 PM
 
5,559 posts, read 7,002,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
Have you seen Google Images of that area? What's your definition of "populated?"



.

You googled. I see, you have not visited the area.
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:18 PM
 
313 posts, read 287,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Way off and I now question your legitimacy in terms of knowledge of the area. It is a very Irish metro, actually. Ask people in the area about Salt Potatoes, the Tipperary Hill neighborhood, Westvale, what was the background of many of the people that built the Erie Canal and more, and it would make more sense.

What is with this website and proving you actually live somewhere?

Salt potatoes? Seriously?

Are you refuting that Syracuse ISNT Italian? What HS did you go to? Henninger? F-M? Cicero North Syracuse? Corcoran?

I went to Proctor.
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