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Old 01-12-2009, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,484,936 times
Reputation: 10118

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScranBarre View Post
Steve-O, do you have the phone number of that stud standing by the car in your one picture?!! DDROOOLL!!!!
lol

Nope, sorry. That photo started as a joke for my friend. We were curious as to how and why that junky-arse T/A made it into the car show, so I took a pic. There's a little inside joke between my friend and I and that body-style T/A. I ended up keeping the pic because it captured the moment well... a gorgeous Friday summer evening, wicked cars, historic town, etc. Too bad the photo couldnt capture the smell of high-octane gas, popcorn, cotton candy, sweet perfume, and the scent of summer.
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Old 01-12-2009, 09:27 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,150 posts, read 9,934,593 times
Reputation: 6434
Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
This is how i feel about my corner of the Rust Belt...............keep your soulless shiny new cities! I'd rather live in an area that has character and a little "rust". I can't stand transient cities where people have no ties to the area and destroy the landscape and towns they inhibit. I think in the end the rust belt will have the last laugh. We've got the affordable homes (sometimes more than the new south) and the cultural institutions of much larger cities w/out the traffic and congestion.


I agree with most of your above statement. Sometimes in these days of mass migrations of huge populations it is good to live in a perfectly fine city that is a bit off the radar screen.

The Queens that I grew up in for 20 years is mostly gone. I remember a neighborhood where some of the older people had lived in the area, sometimes the same block or even the same house their entire lives. We had our own business district - crazy as it sounds in some ways it was like living in a small town.

Some of my old neighbors are still there and most of the familar landmarks still exist. But today while Queens in alot of ways has improved - much of the population has no real ties to the area.
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Old 01-12-2009, 09:28 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,150 posts, read 9,934,593 times
Reputation: 6434
Stevo O is it possible you live in Galena Illinois? Looks like a nice area from your photos.
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Old 01-12-2009, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,403 posts, read 7,780,376 times
Reputation: 3626
Great photos Steve-o and ScranBarre. The rust belt has a vast resource that is going to become more valuable than anyone can imagine in the next few decades. The largest supply of fresh water on the planet. Good water supplies will become more valuable than oil, and in many places they already are. I think the southwestern part of the US is in for some big water trouble, and it might not be that far off. You know things are getting bad when it's considered normal for a city (in the county where I live) to take treated wastewater and pump it into the ground, percolate the water down and pump it out again, add some chlorine and send it into the water pipe to your home. Take good care of your water and hang onto it, it might be a secret weapon that could bring back a lot of clout to your area!
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Old 01-12-2009, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,484,936 times
Reputation: 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Stevo O is it possible you live in Galena Illinois? Looks like a nice area from your photos.
Nope, Im smack-dab in the middle of Chicago's western suburbs. Im in Warrenville, about 5 minutes north of the Naperville border.

But if you want Galena, here she is in all her glory.

<a href="http://s41.photobucket.com/albums/e295/envenomate/?action=view&current=DeSotoHotel.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e295/envenomate/DeSotoHotel.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>






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Old 01-12-2009, 09:50 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,150 posts, read 9,934,593 times
Reputation: 6434
Very nice.. Looks like a beautiful area!

I think I am different from most of the posters on this CD board now. Most seem to like the inner city urban lifestyle. I now prefer to live in a nice town or small city like the ones in your pictures and have occassional access to the inner city urban lifestlye lol!
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Old 01-12-2009, 10:27 PM
 
2,541 posts, read 10,395,199 times
Reputation: 968
man chicago is beautiful man

What is the rust belt's economy then?

What do the people do for a living then?

Honestly though I consider Silicon Valley, and Wall Street to be "gimmick business"

In other words, IT and Finance rely on other more essential, non-cyclical, every-day industries to make their money

Without these types of manufacturers, retailers, etc, IT and Finance would be point-less

Is food processing, and agri-business, agricultural engineering big in these rustbelt cities?
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Old 01-12-2009, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,572,777 times
Reputation: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Answers View Post
Actually, the irony is that that's not happening at all. Cities like Cleveland, Detroit and Pittsburgh continue to lose people, businesses, and opportunities to vibrant southern and western cities. Instead of doing exactly what you're suggesting, the leadership in these cities are circling the wagons around the unions, public schools, and traditional black identity politics keeping the rust best from dusting itself off and entering the 21st Century.
I've said this many times on this forum, but I'll summarize it again.

Simply because Pittsburgh is losing population doesn't mean that it is losing many people to the sunbelt or is stuck trying to revive manufacturing. Our loss in population has mostly to do with an elderly dying population and a missing generation of child-producing 30 year-olds. We have less blue collar jobs than most other cities, zero steel mills, and an economy that has truly transitioned from industry to health care, education and technology. If you want evidence of this: University of Pittsburgh Medical Center is now the largest employer in the city; we have three nationally ranked universities with CMU, Pitt, Duquesne in addition to over 25 other area universities; Pittsburgh has been named the top city in the world (outside of Japan) in robotics and is huge into AI. Additionally, PNC is now the 5th largest bank in the U.S.
Though you are right that our political system is backwards, the city is not in as bad shape as many suspect. Population figures don't tell the whole story.

Last edited by ainulinale; 01-12-2009 at 10:41 PM..
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Old 01-12-2009, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,572,777 times
Reputation: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Chutzpah View Post
man chicago is beautiful man

What is the rust belt's economy then?

What do the people do for a living then?

Honestly though I consider Silicon Valley, and Wall Street to be "gimmick business"

In other words, IT and Finance rely on other more essential, non-cyclical, every-day industries to make their money

Without these types of manufacturers, retailers, etc, IT and Finance would be point-less

Is food processing, and agri-business, agricultural engineering big in these rustbelt cities?

Pittsburgh relies on education, health care, finance and technology.

Last edited by ainulinale; 01-12-2009 at 10:40 PM..
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Old 01-12-2009, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,069 posts, read 102,785,508 times
Reputation: 33127
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Chutzpah View Post
man chicago is beautiful man

What is the rust belt's economy then?

What do the people do for a living then?

Honestly though I consider Silicon Valley, and Wall Street to be "gimmick business"

In other words, IT and Finance rely on other more essential, non-cyclical, every-day industries to make their money

Without these types of manufacturers, retailers, etc, IT and Finance would be point-less

Is food processing, and agri-business, agricultural engineering big in these rustbelt cities?
Well, IT is a part of every business today; it's not a separate "industry". Maybe you are thinking of telecom?

Food processing and other agricultural businesses are not the rust-belt. The rust-belt was historically into heavy manufacturing (steel, automobiles, locomotives, etc).
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