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Old 07-16-2012, 08:16 AM
 
56,780 posts, read 81,126,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy;25191106[B[B
]]"Down to earth" what does that mean? Having your paint peeling off? Not flushing your toilet before you show a house? Mice droppings on your counter? Non-working A/C even though says differently in the stats? Roofs reshingled so much you can see it heave when you look at it? Cracks in the ceilings from God knows what? Bathrooms from the 50's? These are only a few of the things I saw. I actually saw a house where outside of the sliders were 4-5 feet drops. Drops, so if a child opens the door and steps out... In 2 rooms. Another one had wires coming out of the bathroom walls. I worried I might be electrocuted just passing by. Even my realtor said whoa.[/[/b]b]

Some of these things aren't "down to earth," they are a mindset of stagnation and apathy. There's a difference. I wonder why these people cannot sell their homes or give them away. Researching a place on paper and living it are 2 different things. You can research, visit, etc., but nothing prepares you for living in a place, day in and out.
That doesn't have anything to do with the people in the area being "Down to earth" and who knows how long those homes were empty for. Again, that is why asking questions and researching is important. You could find examples of such homes anywhere and who knows the circumstances as to why they are the way they are(i.e.-foreclosure, elderly, death, etc.). I wonder where you were looking for homes anyway? People at the end of the day are responsible for their own happiness.

What's interesting is that you have plenty of people for that area's forum that would have given plenty of suggestions, if you asked questions. People aren't as materialistic in the area and even the more upscale areas are tame in terms of attitudes in comparison to other areas. Even you yourself have mentioned this.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 07-16-2012 at 08:28 AM..
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Old 07-16-2012, 08:42 AM
 
8,751 posts, read 10,871,491 times
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I wonder where you were looking for homes anyway? People at the end of the day are responsible for their own happiness.
In decent suburbs, not the hood! Some do have certain circumstances, but out of 35 homes, if only 2 are excellent, 4-5 are moderate and the rest in very poor condition, this says something about an area.

Yes, people are responsible for their own happiness, but people need to know everything about an area before they make a decision. I am reporting what I see, what I've experienced according to me, not anyone else. You don't know an area till you live in it is my advise to people.

Last edited by Nanny Goat; 07-16-2012 at 08:57 AM..
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Old 07-16-2012, 09:45 AM
 
56,780 posts, read 81,126,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
In decent suburbs, not the hood! Some do have certain circumstances, but out of 35 homes, if only 2 are excellent, 4-5 are moderate and the rest in very poor condition, this says something about an area.

Yes, people are responsible for their own happiness, but people need to know everything about an area before they make a decision. I am reporting what I see, what I've experienced according to me, not anyone else. You don't know an area till you live in it is my advise to people.
What decent suburbs have that many poor homes and at what price range? I think people are going to be more apt to listen to people that know the area extensively versus someone that has been there for a couple of months.
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Old 07-16-2012, 11:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
What decent suburbs have that many poor homes and at what price range? I think people are going to be more apt to listen to people that know the area extensively versus someone that has been there for a couple of months.
I looked at homes in Camillus, North Syracuse, Clay, Liverpool, Cicero and Salina. Price ranges 110-135. Have you been shopping for houses in those areas recently? I have. This is what I've found. My husband felt the same and he's a regular guy, not that picky and not a woman who fusses over the insides of homes. I didn't say they were all "bad," but only 2 excellent 4-6 marginal needed work and the rest awful. I looked at around 35. The ones I wanted to look at that looked nice in pxs. went into contract fast so there could be more good ones in those.

I'm a NY'er, not here a couple of months. I grew up in Upstate, know about Upstate very well. I have friends in Upstate, different areas, and am familiar with the area in general. I'm not a newbie or novice when it comes to house shopping. These are the conditions out there, in general, and unless you want a brand new house, plan on being very lucky or spending money upgrading. Also, the realtors here are an interesting bunch. You never see flyers outside the homes and inspections here are optional. Hmmm. OUr realtor didn't even stress we get one. Hmmm.We had one, but it was flimsy compared to the one when we sold in another state.

The costs to upgrade are not as much here as other areas in the country though so there's one benefit and people know other people who can do things a bit cheaper, too.
You also have the tax issues here in NY. Other prices for things can offset that, but they aren't cheap in Onondaga County.

Last edited by Nanny Goat; 07-16-2012 at 12:01 PM..
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Old 07-16-2012, 12:07 PM
 
56,780 posts, read 81,126,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
I looked at homes in Camillus, North Syracuse, Clay, Liverpool, Salina. Price ranges 110-135. Have you been shopping for houses in those areas recently? I have. This is what I've found. My husband felt the same and he's a regular guy, not that picky and not a woman who fusses over the insides of homes.

I'm a NY'er, not here a couple of months. I grew up in Upstate, know about Upstate very well. I have friends in Upstate, different areas, and am familiar with the area in general. I'm not a newbie or novice when it comes to house shopping. I think the Upstate areas are deteriorating, in general, and unless you want a brand new house, plan on being very lucky or spending money upgrading. Some of the houses over 140 range are probably in very good condition, but can't say that absolutely.The costs to upgrade are not as much here as other areas in the country though so there's one benefit and people know other people who can do things a bit cheaper, too.
Actually, out of the major Upstate NY metros, only Buffalo lost people the last decade and all of the cities are actually investing within city limits. You can find many fine homes in that price range in the area and there plenty of other towns/areas that have homes in that price range that were not mentioned. I got my house(about 1300 sq ft) 4 years ago for $ 86,900 in Salina and the house was taken care of, as it was owned by 1 family. There were some upgrades needed, but they were minimal and affordable. So, it depends on where you look. I did change Realtors and sometimes that makes a difference.

Also, if you want homes with more character, look in urban neighborhoods and old money types of suburbs. You can look here:CNYHomes - Search Home Listings in Syracuse and Central New York

Upstate New York Real Estate

BTW- Some would question if the Hudson Valley is Upstate. I'm just saying....

and evidence of investment: http://centralny.ynn.com/content/top...--1-4-billion/

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 07-16-2012 at 12:17 PM..
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Old 07-16-2012, 12:23 PM
 
8,751 posts, read 10,871,491 times
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Actually, out of the major Upstate NY metros, only Buffalo lost people the last decade and all of the cities are actually investing within city limits. You can find many fine homes in that price range in the area and there plenty of other towns/areas that have homes in that price range that were not mentioned. I got my house(about 1300 sq ft) 4 years ago for $ 86,900 in Salina and the house was taken care of, as it was owned by 1 family. There were some upgrades needed, but they were minimal and affordable. So, it depends on where you look. I did change Realtors and sometimes that makes a difference.

Also, if you want homes with more character, look in urban neighborhoods and old money types of suburbs. You can look here:CNYHomes - Search Home Listings in Syracuse and Central New York

Upstate New York Real Estate

BTW- Some would question if the Hudson Valley is Upstate. I'm just saying....

and evidence of investment: Investments in downtown Syracuse total $1.4 billion - YNN, Your News Now
Right, only you know anything about Upstate and only you have the answers to everyone posting about everything. Typifies insular thinking--everything is through your eyes only. Not able to see any other perspective, but your own. Interesting, but I don't think people tend to trust a person who repeats the same reterick day after day. They want a balanced perspective. And, I probably lived in Upstate longer than your years alive! And, if you included my family, friends and acquaintances, probably centuries! I have roots all over NY state, small towns and big cities. I have no problem looking at the positives or the negatives.

Last edited by Nanny Goat; 07-16-2012 at 12:36 PM..
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Old 07-16-2012, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,106 posts, read 13,518,144 times
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People need to realize that the "Rust Belt" is largely something that existed in the 1970s and 1980s. The problem with this image continuing on today is that the Midwest and Great Lakes is still one of the most, if not the most, important and largest manufacturing centers in the entire world. For all the decline that happened decades ago, that remains true, and has recently begun to grow again. Most of the cities originally considered Rust Belt have diversified or are seeing major development/investments within their cores. Other cities, like Pittsburgh, Rochester and Dayton, Ohio have seen long-declining population start to grow again, while others, like Milwaukee, have stabilized. Outside of maybe Detroit, there really aren't any old Rust Belt cities that continue to free fall. Even Detroit's cousin, Cleveland, has been mentioned multiple times in publications the last year for it's revitalization and growing population in the city core, along with its rising manufacturing jobs. Ohio and Pennsylvania are seeing large investments because of the natural gas boom, and for Ohio, every single one of its 7 major metros have unemployment a percentage point or more below the national average. The state had two 2 of the last 4 months have top 2 job growth of any state in the US. The Midwest as a region has the lowest unemployment rates in the country.

Beyond that, these states simply have better infrastructure, more natural resources like water, coal and gas and more amenities than many of the states that were/are popular destinations in recent decades. My home state of Ohio, contrary to popular belief, is also one of the largest for tourism, bringing in about $40 billion a year, topped only by some of the larger, more populated states like California, NY and Florida.

This idea that people seem to perpetuate that there is nothing to offer in "Rust Belt" states is probably the single most overblown BS ever. The jobs are there, the amenities are there and the cost of living is on par with or lower than most of the country. It's a beautiful, diverse area that can't be stereotyped based on one or two cities who may be having ongoing, but fading problems.
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Old 07-16-2012, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,106 posts, read 13,518,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
In decent suburbs, not the hood! Some do have certain circumstances, but out of 35 homes, if only 2 are excellent, 4-5 are moderate and the rest in very poor condition, this says something about an area.

Yes, people are responsible for their own happiness, but people need to know everything about an area before they make a decision. I am reporting what I see, what I've experienced according to me, not anyone else. You don't know an area till you live in it is my advise to people.
I think a lot of people would see a run down house and look at its potential. Every gentrified neighborhood was once a ghetto full of abandoned homes that were in bad shape. There were enough people who saw potential to change the neighborhood one house at a time. If you're not that kind of person, that's fine, but don't confuse building neglect with a regional attitude. These buildings are found in every city on the planet.
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Old 07-16-2012, 12:43 PM
 
56,780 posts, read 81,126,018 times
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Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
Right, only you know anything about Upstate and only you have the answers to everyone posting about everything. Typifies insular thinking--everything is through your eyes only. Not able to see any other perspective, but your own. Interesting, but I don't think people tend to trust a person who repeats the same reterick day after day. They want a balanced perspective. And, I probably lived in Upstate longer than your years alive! And, if you included my family, friends and acquaintances, probably centuries! I have roots all over NY state, small towns and big cities. I have no problem looking at the positives or the negatives.
So, that is what it is about. I don't care either way either, but there may be people more in tune to a particular area than others. If people want both sides, that's fine, but at least have information for people to run with. It seems to be confusing trying to your points, at times.
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Old 07-16-2012, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Columbus, OH
189 posts, read 341,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
People need to realize that the "Rust Belt" is largely something that existed in the 1970s and 1980s. The problem with this image continuing on today is that the Midwest and Great Lakes is still one of the most, if not the most, important and largest manufacturing centers in the entire world. For all the decline that happened decades ago, that remains true, and has recently begun to grow again. Most of the cities originally considered Rust Belt have diversified or are seeing major development/investments within their cores. Other cities, like Pittsburgh, Rochester and Dayton, Ohio have seen long-declining population start to grow again, while others, like Milwaukee, have stabilized. Outside of maybe Detroit, there really aren't any old Rust Belt cities that continue to free fall. Even Detroit's cousin, Cleveland, has been mentioned multiple times in publications the last year for it's revitalization and growing population in the city core, along with its rising manufacturing jobs. Ohio and Pennsylvania are seeing large investments because of the natural gas boom, and for Ohio, every single one of its 7 major metros have unemployment a percentage point or more below the national average. The state had two 2 of the last 4 months have top 2 job growth of any state in the US. The Midwest as a region has the lowest unemployment rates in the country.

Beyond that, these states simply have better infrastructure, more natural resources like water, coal and gas and more amenities than many of the states that were/are popular destinations in recent decades. My home state of Ohio, contrary to popular belief, is also one of the largest for tourism, bringing in about $40 billion a year, topped only by some of the larger, more populated states like California, NY and Florida.

This idea that people seem to perpetuate that there is nothing to offer in "Rust Belt" states is probably the single most overblown BS ever. The jobs are there, the amenities are there and the cost of living is on par with or lower than most of the country. It's a beautiful, diverse area that can't be stereotyped based on one or two cities who may be having ongoing, but fading problems.
Yeah, I think that just about sums it up. Ohio is such a great place to live. I have some fond memories of going to Cedar Point and then getting picked up from the marina in my Dad's boat and heading home while the sun was still setting. Good times.
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