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Old 01-22-2009, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Arlington, VA and Washington, DC
23,634 posts, read 33,424,168 times
Reputation: 32351

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For Washington DC:

VA:
Lorton
Woodbridge
Manassas
Herndon
Dumfries

MD:
Camp Springs
Clinton
Cheverly
New Carrollton

You will find that most of these surburbs have a pretty negative perception which is underserved. Most of these areas dont have high crime rates although some surround areas with high crime rates; specifically in Maryland.
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:44 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
2,650 posts, read 5,160,143 times
Reputation: 2300
One of my favorite places on earth is an industrial, ugly, working class suburb.
I felt comfortable with the people in the area instantaneously. It has a true sense of community.
Harrison, New Jersey............. (I've never been a resident of Harrison by the way)






This is apparently a city data pic.




Harrison is the future home of the NY Red Bull soccer team BTW



Last edited by openheads; 01-22-2009 at 07:56 PM..
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:56 PM
HKB
 
220 posts, read 708,991 times
Reputation: 147
Minneapolis/St. Paul

Anoka County (a suburban county north/northwest of the Twin Cities) has a reputation of being home to many blue-collar workers in this area.
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:04 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12500
Quote:
Originally Posted by openheads View Post
One of my favorite places on earth is an industrial, ugly, working class suburb.
I felt comfortable with the people in the area instantaneously. It has a true sense of community.
Harrison, New Jersey............. (I've never been a resident of Harrison by the way)






This is apparently a city data pic.




Harrison is the future home of the NY Red Bull soccer team BTW

These pictures look similar to Solvay in my area. I wish I could find some pictures though.
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:46 PM
 
Location: DFW Texas
3,096 posts, read 6,774,493 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
What are some names of these communities in that area?

Baytown
Deer Park
Galena Park
Pasadena
Jacinto City
Channelview
LaPorte
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
1,576 posts, read 5,136,377 times
Reputation: 683
Quote:
Originally Posted by openheads View Post
One of my favorite places on earth is an industrial, ugly, working class suburb.
I felt comfortable with the people in the area instantaneously. It has a true sense of community.
Harrison, New Jersey............. (I've never been a resident of Harrison by the way)






This is apparently a city data pic.




Harrison is the future home of the NY Red Bull soccer team BTW

I wouldnt call it ugly.. I think Harrison has some sort of unique character to it. I actually like towns like these in a way, sprawling suburban areas can get boring.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:58 AM
 
2,486 posts, read 2,360,151 times
Reputation: 830
Pittsburgh is easy to describe. You have three rivers, on going N.E., one pretty much due south, and one going north west. Along these rivers 75% of the towns are or were industrial suburbs. Not much of the industry is left. Most of these towns are old, and were not built connected to the city of Pittsburgh. They were their own town, with their own identity. They are very dense, but unfortunately many are very run down, especially along the Mon Valley. As you get to the places between the rivers, you have you typical 1950-2000 non-industrial suburbs.

I believe these industrial towns along the rivers will be brought back eventually. They are perfect for centralized living. Most have nice size yard, the houses are beautiful, and compact and nice business districts. However, today's society wants their strip malls, suv, and box house in a subdivision in what use to be forest land.

If the Pittsburgh metro would only expand rail along the rivers (there are many existing unused tracks) these places would flourish. They would be perfect for TOD (train oriented development). You would be able to build new condos, offices, shopping centers, and be a 10-15 minute train ride to the central city. However, my vision will never happen. Not in my life, or the next generation's life. To many people roll their eyes at these ideas, and think living in one of those god awful centralized, historic, towns would be horrible. Then they go off to their subdivision to close their garage door on society and watch TV. It is sad when the actual idea of a town is dying off, and going out is typically leaving through the garage in your car, and you never actually set foot in the place you live.
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Old 01-23-2009, 03:04 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awesomo.2000 View Post
Pittsburgh is easy to describe. You have three rivers, on going N.E., one pretty much due south, and one going north west. Along these rivers 75% of the towns are or were industrial suburbs. Not much of the industry is left. Most of these towns are old, and were not built connected to the city of Pittsburgh. They were their own town, with their own identity. They are very dense, but unfortunately many are very run down, especially along the Mon Valley. As you get to the places between the rivers, you have you typical 1950-2000 non-industrial suburbs.

I believe these industrial towns along the rivers will be brought back eventually. They are perfect for centralized living. Most have nice size yard, the houses are beautiful, and compact and nice business districts. However, today's society wants their strip malls, suv, and box house in a subdivision in what use to be forest land.

If the Pittsburgh metro would only expand rail along the rivers (there are many existing unused tracks) these places would flourish. They would be perfect for TOD (train oriented development). You would be able to build new condos, offices, shopping centers, and be a 10-15 minute train ride to the central city. However, my vision will never happen. Not in my life, or the next generation's life. To many people roll their eyes at these ideas, and think living in one of those god awful centralized, historic, towns would be horrible. Then they go off to their subdivision to close their garage door on society and watch TV. It is sad when the actual idea of a town is dying off, and going out is typically leaving through the garage in your car, and you never actually set foot in the place you live.
I know. I think people in that area need to think more about your idea. People actually like communities with character, that are walkable. I've never been to Pittsburgh, but it seems like an area I would like for some reason.

Plus, many of those communities are actually diverse ethnically and racially and have been for a long time too. So, that adds to the character of the community. Pittsburgh seems like a city and area that would surprise a lot of people in a good way.
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Old 01-27-2009, 01:17 PM
 
2,359 posts, read 8,186,949 times
Reputation: 1102
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I know. I think people in that area need to think more about your idea. People actually like communities with character, that are walkable. I've never been to Pittsburgh, but it seems like an area I would like for some reason.

Plus, many of those communities are actually diverse ethnically and racially and have been for a long time too. So, that adds to the character of the community. Pittsburgh seems like a city and area that would surprise a lot of people in a good way.
Try living there for two winters. I'm sure it will surprise you! I never knew how much I liked a cold, snowy winter over a wet and dreary one until I lived there.

For suburban Syracuse, many would consider Mattydale a blue collar suburb. Though it's not exactly industrial since it lacks any large industrial area in it. Minoa is another blue collar community IMO.
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Old 01-27-2009, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,323 posts, read 9,569,145 times
Reputation: 1512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awesomo.2000 View Post
Pittsburgh is easy to describe. You have three rivers, on going N.E., one pretty much due south, and one going north west. Along these rivers 75% of the towns are or were industrial suburbs. Not much of the industry is left. Most of these towns are old, and were not built connected to the city of Pittsburgh. They were their own town, with their own identity. They are very dense, but unfortunately many are very run down, especially along the Mon Valley. As you get to the places between the rivers, you have you typical 1950-2000 non-industrial suburbs.

I believe these industrial towns along the rivers will be brought back eventually. They are perfect for centralized living. Most have nice size yard, the houses are beautiful, and compact and nice business districts. However, today's society wants their strip malls, suv, and box house in a subdivision in what use to be forest land.

If the Pittsburgh metro would only expand rail along the rivers (there are many existing unused tracks) these places would flourish. They would be perfect for TOD (train oriented development). You would be able to build new condos, offices, shopping centers, and be a 10-15 minute train ride to the central city. However, my vision will never happen. Not in my life, or the next generation's life. To many people roll their eyes at these ideas, and think living in one of those god awful centralized, historic, towns would be horrible. Then they go off to their subdivision to close their garage door on society and watch TV. It is sad when the actual idea of a town is dying off, and going out is typically leaving through the garage in your car, and you never actually set foot in the place you live.
There are many towns like that from Warren, Ohio along the Mahoning River, down through Youngstown and into New Castle, Pennsylvania.
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