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Old 01-27-2009, 03:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellafinzi View Post
Try living there for two winters. I'm sure it will surprise you! I never knew how much I liked a cold, snowy winter over a wet and dreary one until I lived there.

For suburban Syracuse, many would consider Mattydale a blue collar suburb. Though it's not exactly industrial since it lacks any large industrial area in it. Minoa is another blue collar community IMO.
Forgot about Minoa, which also was a railroad town. So, pretty much the East Syracuse-Minoa school district is a district with newer suburban developments surrounding two blue collar suburbs.

Mattydale is more working class, but without the industry. There is some close by in the Crouse-Hinds plant though. Same with Nedrow and Galeville. Lyncourt could also be considered to be an industrial suburb with the soon to be closed Syracuse China plant located there.
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Old 01-27-2009, 03:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
There are many towns like that from Warren, Ohio along the Mahoning River, down through Youngstown and into New Castle, Pennsylvania.
Do communities like Farrell, Sharon and Hermitage affiliate themselves more with the Youngstown-Warren area or with Pittsburgh?
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Old 01-27-2009, 03:38 PM
 
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Atlanta's industrial/blue collar burbs:

1. East Point - textiles; machinery; chemicals; paper...and the location of the National Archives and Records Administration facility.

2. Hapeville - home to the gigantic Ford Assembly Plant for over 60 years...the downtown has railroad tracks running through the center...also home to the original Chick-Fil-A restaurant location.

3. Carrollton - textile mills; wire and cable manufacturing; metal fabrication; paper; poultry/meat processing plants; plastics; food processing

4. Gainesville - textile mills; food processing; livestock feed; lumber; heavy equipment...several poultry processing plants...nicknamed "The Chicken Capital of the World"

5. Marietta - Lockheed-Martin plant; metals; Dobbins Air Force Base

6. Forest Park - chemicals; metals; metal fabrication and stamping,

7. Doraville - huge GM Assmebly Plant; metals; industrial/automotive machinery; automotive parts/lubricants; industrial containers,

8. Dalton - carpet, rug, textile mills; flooring; cleaning chemicals; dyes

9. Norcross - printing, automotive parts, publishing, communications equipment, wire and cable, sports/playground equipment
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Old 01-27-2009, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Do communities like Farrell, Sharon and Hermitage affiliate themselves more with the Youngstown-Warren area or with Pittsburgh?
Actually, yes, Mercer Co. is part of our metro. Lawrence is part of our CSA. I see lots of Pennsylvania plates at the Eastwood Mall in Niles. The mall in Hermitage kind of sucks, but it surprises me that so many Pennsylvanians will drive over here to buy clothes when Ohio taxes clothing and Pa does not. When it comes to sports there are plenty of Steeler fans over there and i'm sure they identify more w/Pittsburgh than Cleveland. Although, i do know a number of Cleveland fans across the border.

Industrial/Blue collar suburbs-ywrcmaplarge.gif

Here in the Youngstown/Warren area many people spend a lot of time in both cities since they are both an hour away. I tend to spend a lot more time in Cleveland, but i grew up going there more and i'm a Cleveland sports fan. Don't be hatin' Steeler nation! You know we are more alike than you want to admit. You guys were just as sad as we were when Art moved the Browns. I know the sports thing is a little off topic, but i do admire the Rooney's and i think they are part of the reason we got our team back.
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Old 01-27-2009, 06:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Denver: Commerce City and Federal Hts. Also parts of Aurora, Northglenn, Thornton, Westminster, and Broomfield.

These areas have smaller homes, more apartments and other rentals. Commerce City has an oil refinery.
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Old 01-27-2009, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Kansas City, Kansas is a blue collar industrial suburb of Kansas City, MO.

Everybody in the KC area calls it KCK and they call KCMO just KC.

KCK is about 150k, and it is very industrial with auto plants, heavy industry and some of the nation's largest rail yards. The population is very poor and it has a large minority population (black and hispanic). It's also high crime.

In recent years KCK has built a NASCAR track and a ton a development around the track and that area of KCK has become a regional draw. But for the most part, KCK remains a blue collar suburb that has seen better days although much of the industrial areas still flourish, which is better than a lot of heavy industry towns.

Here are a couple of pics I took of KCK

http://photos.imageevent.com/kcphotos/aerialswyandotte/kck_0527.jpg (broken link)

http://photos.imageevent.com/kcphotos/aerialswyandotte/kck_8211.jpg (broken link)
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Old 01-28-2009, 07:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
Kansas City, Kansas is a blue collar industrial suburb of Kansas City, MO.

Everybody in the KC area calls it KCK and they call KCMO just KC.

KCK is about 150k, and it is very industrial with auto plants, heavy industry and some of the nation's largest rail yards. The population is very poor and it has a large minority population (black and hispanic). It's also high crime.

In recent years KCK has built a NASCAR track and a ton a development around the track and that area of KCK has become a regional draw. But for the most part, KCK remains a blue collar suburb that has seen better days although much of the industrial areas still flourish, which is better than a lot of heavy industry towns.

Here are a couple of pics I took of KCK


I just looked at KCK as just an extension of Kansas City into Kansas.
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Old 01-28-2009, 09:38 PM
 
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Just an observation: a blue collar suburb is not necessarily an industrial suburb. The former describes who lives there, the later what economic activity is there.
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Old 01-28-2009, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I just looked at KCK as just an extension of Kansas City into Kansas.
What do you mean? KCK is its own city, not just an extension of KCMO. KCK and KCMO couldn’t be more different in just about every way imaginable, other than their names. KCK is more like a small town, with lower density etc while KCMO is a large urban city more like a St Louis or Pittsburgh or Cincinnati. And if you are curious, KCMO was a city before Kansas was a state and when KCMO was already becoming a large city, in MO, named after the Kansa Indian Tribe, the small town of Wyandotte was beginning to grow across the river. Wyandotte later renamed itself to Kansas City because at the time KCMO was booming and Wyandotte thought the name would bring it similar success. KCK did grow and become a vibrant area for a while, but in never came close to being anything more than a blue collar bedroom community to KCMO, outside the industrial districts.

Now today, nobody knows what state the big KC is in or why a large city in Missouri is called Kansas City.

That was probably way too much information.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Just an observation: a blue collar suburb is not necessarily an industrial suburb. The former describes who lives there, the later what economic activity is there.
That is right, but if a suburb has a lot of heavy industry, chances are very good, probably near 95%, that it's a very blue collar suburb.

Now you have blue collar and white collar residential suburbs or bedroom communities, but I think every city has about dozens of each of those, so I think blue collar/industrial narrows it down a bit and also eliminates many of the smaller blue collar suburbs since industrial suburbs tend to be larger as well.
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Old 01-28-2009, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
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Ansonia, Derby, Shelton, & Naugatuck, CT. For years, people here were working class, blue collar people (won the All American City Award in 2000). Now the average income is rising and people are discovering the area as an affordable alternative to NY and Stamford. They'll soon be filled with yuppies, lol.
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