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Old 01-29-2009, 12:27 PM
 
5,858 posts, read 14,046,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
What do you mean? KCK is its own city, not just an extension of KCMO. KCK and KCMO couldn’t be more different in just about every way imaginable, other than their names. KCK is more like a small town, with lower density etc while KCMO is a large urban city more like a St Louis or Pittsburgh or Cincinnati. And if you are curious, KCMO was a city before Kansas was a state and when KCMO was already becoming a large city, in MO, named after the Kansa Indian Tribe, the small town of Wyandotte was beginning to grow across the river. Wyandotte later renamed itself to Kansas City because at the time KCMO was booming and Wyandotte thought the name would bring it similar success. KCK did grow and become a vibrant area for a while, but in never came close to being anything more than a blue collar bedroom community to KCMO, outside the industrial districts.

Now today, nobody knows what state the big KC is in or why a large city in Missouri is called Kansas City.

That was probably way too much information.
What do you mean, "way too much information?" This is city-data for pete's sake! We're all about way too much information! Bring it on, we love it!
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Old 01-29-2009, 12:58 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,268,700 times
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Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Just an observation: a blue collar suburb is not necessarily an industrial suburb. The former describes who lives there, the later what economic activity is there.
The title of the thread is "Industrial/Blue collar suburbs", so both should be appropriate.
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Old 01-29-2009, 03:32 PM
 
56,581 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Just an observation: a blue collar suburb is not necessarily an industrial suburb. The former describes who lives there, the later what economic activity is there.
True and the latter is what I was looking for. With that said, I wouldn't mind people listing both.
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Old 01-29-2009, 08:40 PM
 
5,858 posts, read 14,046,541 times
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Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
The title of the thread is "Industrial/Blue collar suburbs", so both should be appropriate.
You are correct, my mistake
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