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Old 01-21-2009, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
708 posts, read 2,415,113 times
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Sunset Valley. 1.4 square miles with a population shy of 400. Completely surrounded by the city of Austin on all sides.

Maybe Rollingwood if it didn't feel like such a tight-knit community. 0.7 square miles and no more than three miles from downtown Austin. 1,400 people.
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Old 01-21-2009, 04:48 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,171 posts, read 9,963,640 times
Reputation: 6469
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
You won't have many people replying to this thread that live outside of the northeast.
Actually for a large part of the northeast this is not a problem. New York and New England are divided into incorporated towns - in general all areas outside the cities are incorporated. This is different from many states where many unincorporated areas exist (there is no local government -services are provided by the county).

For the most part these independent towns resist any attempt by a city to annex any of their territory. Years ago things were different and cities were seen as providing great benefits like sewers, sidewalks, and paved roads. That is how NYC for instance got the people of Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island to give up their independence back in 1898.

Believe me, after seeing what New York City has done to the formerly independent Jamaica, Flushing, Brooklyn etc. no town on Long Island or Westchester* is going to voluntarily be annexed. The Boston area is in a similar situation.


* I believe the bankrupt city of Yonkers considered it a few decades back but decided not to.

Last edited by LINative; 01-21-2009 at 05:06 PM..
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Old 01-21-2009, 05:03 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,171 posts, read 9,963,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newarkbomb View Post
Do you know any towns in your area that are like a couple square miles big and ever wonder "WHY DON'T THEY JUST ANNEX IT TO THE BIGGER NEGHBORING TOWNS!" I know i do, im in Bergen County NJ, which probably is the best example of what im talking about because There is 70 towns and cities in one county. And the county is only half the size of Los Angeles.

Some towns are pointless, like Teterboro, NJ which is a square mile big that is mostly industrial with a population of 18... ridiculous

If you could annex any little towns in your area or just anywhere, what towns would you connect??

for me Teterboro, South Hackensack, Hackensack, Maywood, Teaneck, Englewood, and Bogota... Bam one big city with a population of around 105,000
New Jersey is a special case. She used to be organized similar to New York but in the 1890s the NJ state legislature passed one of the worst laws in New Jersey history lol.

Basically many of the New Jersey townships were building schools at this time and most had borrowed the money to do it. The new law provided that if one part of the township broke away - it could keep the schools but would not owe any of the money. The people who still lived in the old township would be responsible for paying back all the school bonds!

Not suprisingly many NJ townships -especially in Essex, Union, Hudson & Bergen counties (which were becoming suburban at the time) broke apart literally overnight into separate cities, boroughs etc. Often very people lived in these new communties and it made no sense to start a new borough - it was just to avoid paying the school bonds back.

New Jersey repealed the law in less than 10 years but the damage was already done.
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Old 01-21-2009, 05:59 PM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,116 posts, read 4,217,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Actually for a large part of the northeast this is not a problem. New York and New England are divided into incorporated towns - in general all areas outside the cities are incorporated. This is different from many states where many unincorporated areas exist (there is no local government -services are provided by the county).

For the most part these independent towns resist any attempt by a city to annex any of their territory. Years ago things were different and cities were seen as providing great benefits like sewers, sidewalks, and paved roads. That is how NYC for instance got the people of Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island to give up their independence back in 1898.

Believe me, after seeing what New York City has done to the formerly independent Jamaica, Flushing, Brooklyn etc. no town on Long Island or Westchester* is going to voluntarily be annexed. The Boston area is in a similar situation.


* I believe the bankrupt city of Yonkers considered it a few decades back but decided not to.

Perfect
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Old 01-21-2009, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,644,855 times
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Several posters have mentioned it, but I don't see what the advantage is for a large city to annex the adjacent small towns. I know they pull in more tax revenue, but you also have more responsibility as well. Just to increase the large city's population for the sake of increasing it doesn't make much sense either. I have no problem with them annexing the smaller towns, as long as the people in those towns say it's OK through a referendum.
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Old 01-21-2009, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Back home in Kaguawagpjpa.
1,990 posts, read 6,990,022 times
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NJ, needs to do something about these 8 block x 5 block towns that have their own police and fire departments, school system, and DPW. That is totally foolish and it kills people with a high tax burden. Though, it would be funny seeing towns like Prospect Park being forced to join Paterson. Or, Hamilton joining Trenton. NJ is known for it's NIMBY and suburban attitude. The 'burbs joinging the cities will never happen.
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Old 01-21-2009, 08:17 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX.
1,226 posts, read 2,720,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bowie View Post
Here in San Antonio, we've got 5 little towns surrounded on at least 3 sides by the city of San Antonio. Only one of them has its own school district. At least 4 of these should be annexed into the big city.

When I lived in Madison, Wisconsin, there was a 2 square-mile area surrounded by the city of Madison that refused to be annexed. That area had the highest crime rate in the entire county. They would have benefitted greatly from the resources of the big-city police force. But time and time again the people who lived there would vote down annexation. It was maddening.
Yep, I'd actually include a couple more that are basically connected as well like Helotes, Bulverde, China Grove, Live Oak, Bracken, Garden Ridge, Converse, Universal City but I think you'd be hard pressed to get Shavano Park to agree to anything being that they make a killing off of San Antonio commuters through their speed trap.

I think it's way off track, and not something practiced, but I also think some dual, tri, and quad cities when grown toghter should join into one. (ie: Minneapolis - Saint Paul, Dallas - Arlington - Fort Worth, Tampa - Saint Petersburg - Clearwater, Los Angeles - Long Beach, etc...) then rename the city. Silly sounding, but would be so much more simple. Then again cooperation between the local government organizations to integate would be impossible.....lol.....just a thought.
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Old 01-21-2009, 08:34 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,957 posts, read 21,220,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alanboy395 View Post
Though not tiny towns Newport News and Hampton, VA should annex together. Both towns are very long but not very wide. Both are kissing cousins of each other. Their combination would make a city of over 300k.
Why not merge all those cities there and have a city the size of Philadelphia? That metro area has over 1.5 million people and most people outside the Mid Atlantic have hardly heard of it / them
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Old 01-21-2009, 09:21 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,171 posts, read 9,963,640 times
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Default Instead of one big city - a metropolitian area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Why not merge all those cities there and have a city the size of Philadelphia? That metro area has over 1.5 million people and most people outside the Mid Atlantic have hardly heard of it / them
They could but what would the gain of being better known be worth the cost? Big cities have governments are often much further away from the people. Politicians are sometimes more likely to listen to real estate interests, builders and big unions than worrying about the quality of life in a local neighborhood.

This is not the 1800s. Suburbs, smaller cities and towns have paved roads, colleges, water, electricity etc. You do not need to join a big city to get those things anymore.

There is an alternative. Instead of consolidating into a Philadelphia - Newport News, Hampton and maybe Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Beach etc could join together in a metropolitian district of some type. These historic cities dating from colonial times get to keep their independence but certain things like water, parks & transportation (buses) are operated jointly to save money. Or they could cooperate to get a Pro sports team, open a university or major hospital etc.

They would get to have their cake and eat it too!
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,644,855 times
Reputation: 1274
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
They could but what would the gain of being better known be worth the cost? Big cities have governments are often much further away from the people. Politicians are sometimes more likely to listen to real estate interests, builders and big unions than worrying about the quality of life in a local neighborhood.

This is not the 1800s. Suburbs, smaller cities and towns have paved roads, colleges, water, electricity etc. You do not need to join a big city to get those things anymore.

There is an alternative. Instead of consolidating into a Philadelphia - Newport News, Hampton and maybe Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Beach etc could join together in a metropolitian district of some type. These historic cities dating from colonial times get to keep their independence but certain things like water, parks & transportation (buses) are operated jointly to save money. Or they could cooperate to get a Pro sports team, open a university or major hospital etc.

They would get to have their cake and eat it too!
Actually, you bring up a couple of good points LINative. I wouldn't want the suburb that I live in to be annexed by Chicago. I feel that in a smaller community, government is closer to you and you are less likely to get lots of additional rules and regulations crammed down your throat. I have all the conveniences I need and am willing to pay for and am doubtful that being annexed by a large city would give me anything but increased taxes.
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