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View Poll Results: Are Northeasterners Less Liberal than Perceived?
Yes 26 56.52%
No 9 19.57%
Perception is Accurate 11 23.91%
Voters: 46. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-21-2009, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,567,384 times
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While the popular conception of the East Coast is one of intense liberalism, I am not convinced this is the truth. About 42% of New Jersey voters believed that John McCain was better suited to president than Obama. Additionally, 37% of those from Massachusetts, 43% from Maryland, 39% from Connecticut, 45% from Pennsylvania, 45% from New Hampshire, and 41% from Maine felt likewise. Now, in a country that supported McCain by about 46%, this does not seem that liberal to me. What do you think.

Additionally, do you think that native Northeasterners make up a large percentage of these conservatives in the big cities? Are native New Yorkers significantly more conservative than those native and non-native immigrants?
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Old 01-21-2009, 11:28 PM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,116 posts, read 4,203,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
While the popular conception of the East Coast is one of intense liberalism, I am not convinced this is the truth. About 42% of New Jersey voters believed that John McCain was better suited to president than Obama. Additionally, 37% of those from Massachusetts, 43% from Maryland, 39% from Connecticut, 45% from Pennsylvania, 45% from New Hampshire, and 41% from Maine felt likewise. Now, in a country that supported McCain by about 46%, this does not seem that liberal to me. What do you think.

Well if you are measuring intense liberalism by the percentage voted Obama/McCain, what states voted more democrat than the east coast (is caps expected?):

DC
Hawai'i
Vermont
Rhode Island
Massachusetts
New York
Illinois
Deleware
Maryland
Connecticut
Maine

...Where is Obama from again?...

Last edited by TheWereRabbit; 01-22-2009 at 12:17 AM..
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Old 01-21-2009, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,567,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWereRabbit View Post
Well if you are measuring intense liberalism percentage voted Obama/McCain, what states voted more democrat then the east coast (is caps expected?):

DC
Hawai'i
Vermont
Rhode Island
Massachusetts
New York
Illinois
Deleware
Maryland
Connecticut
Maine

...Where is Obama from again?...
Well, I do kind of think that's beside the point. There was a thread on here not too long ago about how blue states should separate from red states; yet, even 42% of voters from New Jersey seem to be more aligned with the red staters. When such a healthy chunk of your populace is conservative, how can act like your state is so liberal? Additionally, places like NJ, CT, MD are all pretty urban and concentrated around major cities (thus, they should naturally be more liberal), while states like Washington, Oregon and California have massive rural areas.
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Old 01-22-2009, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Houston Texas
2,898 posts, read 2,879,263 times
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Welfare and labor unions are pretty big issues in the Northeast. Many lower income people will vote Dem based on the welfare platform and not because of "liberal" issues. Many also are involved with the unions and will vote Dem because of this too, and not because of liberal social issues. Racism is just as prevelent in the Northeast as in the South. Having lived a long time in both regions, I can accurately attest to that.
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:43 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,774,278 times
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I could turn this around and say "Is the Midwest Less Conservative than Perceived"? Texas voted 44% Obama, Mississippi 43%, etc.....

I think the answer is both areas (with some exceptions) are probably less liberal/conservative than the stereotypes.

My NJ town voted 65% McCain - because of ecomonic issues, not social (unlike someplace like Utah, for instance).
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:51 AM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,222,576 times
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When you say "East Coast" do you mean the northeast, specifically? Or are you including Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida?
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Southeast
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Considering McCain wasn't really running on a Conservative platform, I believe the 2008 election results are a horrible indicator of how 'Liberal' or 'Conservative' a state is. In my experience, there are only a handful of die hard Liberals and Conservative, the rest of us are Centrists who vote primarily on policy, not party. Voting for Obama certainly does not make you Liberal, especially when you consider that since he took office his views seem to align more with Conservatives.
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Old 01-22-2009, 09:01 AM
 
2,486 posts, read 2,361,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetclimber View Post
Welfare and labor unions are pretty big issues in the Northeast. Many lower income people will vote Dem based on the welfare platform and not because of "liberal" issues. Many also are involved with the unions and will vote Dem because of this too, and not because of liberal social issues. Racism is just as prevelent in the Northeast as in the South. Having lived a long time in both regions, I can accurately attest to that.

You hit the nail in the head. Liberalism/democrat or Republican/conservatism are not as simple as the media and stereotypes want us to believe.

There are many Democratic conservatives in the N.E. Most are as you said, labor unions. I spent a summer having to supervise building construction. Pretty much watching over lower middle class democratic union guys. Some of these guys are more racist and conservative than a southern Klu Klux Klan memeber, and would never vote for a Black man no matter what.

I also went to college with friends that came from the upper class suburbs of Washington and Conneticut. These kids smoked pot, as well as other drugs, had sex with different women every night, partied hardy, denounced their Christianity, etc, and belonged to the Students for the Republican party group. However, it looked like they were hippie liberals.

The media simplifies it too far. You are either a God fearing conservative or a hippie welfare liberal. Humans are not that simple. A person like myself has mixed views along different issues such as drug legalization, seperation of church and state, capital punishment, the environment, urban issues, and so on. It isn't as simple as a us vs them.
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Old 01-22-2009, 09:05 AM
 
2,758 posts, read 4,923,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubber_factory View Post
When you say "East Coast" do you mean the northeast, specifically? Or are you including Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida?
Of course not.
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Old 01-22-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,942,363 times
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There are two types of conservatives: economic/foreign policy conservatives and social conservatives. The former have a strong presence in the northeast, the latter are very weak. "Guns, Gays and God" just doesn't resonate up here like it does elsewhere. The Republican politicians who have done well, Giuliani, Pataki, Weld, Ridge, etc., were are all pro-choice and, for the most part, pro-gay rights.

The McCain of 2000 could have been competitive here (he won New Hampshire) but, with his sharp turn to the social conservatives in 2004, he lost the moderates. Once he chose Sarah Palin it was all over.

It highlights the quandry faced by the Republican Party in general. Bill Clinton's greatest triumph (and probably most lasting legacy) was to demonstrate that Democrats could be fiscally responsible. It undercut the Republican's "socialist" charge in this election cycle. Without economic issues (and with Bush's foreign policy fiascos) they had little to campaign on except social issues and it, obviously, wasn't enough. Without a Clinton, I don't think there could have been an Obama.

If a Republican candidate were to drop the social issues, he or she could be competitive in New York and California. It would still be close, but competitive.
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