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Old 10-29-2011, 02:29 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,374 posts, read 19,297,224 times
Reputation: 8487

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Thanks. Yes, some advice was a bit weird, made me wonder if people were just joking

Yes, I have come to exclude the southern regions as well, not least because of the bugs. I have looked at many places on Google Street View. I guess the least appropriate would be states like Missouri, towns there are very large in terms of area and still lack any real center. Not to mention the nasty spiders that live there in abundance. North of Iowa there are much fewer bugs. And places look more appealing, the infrastructure seems well maintained in Iowa and Minnesota. Hardly any ugly or rotting buildings, lots of trees along roads, etc. I have seen places further south that looked like from a developing country, frankly

I have already heard many good things about the NW But it is rather expensive to live there, like in most good places.
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Old 10-29-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,226 posts, read 19,525,937 times
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You probably realize by now that it's very difficult to find a region with all the things you want. In the U.S., living in a smaller, isolated town/city w/o a car is next to impossible or impractical to be sure. The system is just not built that way here. Also, there's a correlation between the size of a city and how racially diverse it is. Smaller towns and cities are usually much more homogenous (white) in population, especially in northern and midwestern states. Therefore, since you want greater diversity, that's probably not the way to go. Also, cities that small will lack many amenities that you will probably want eventually.

That's why I recommend at least a mid-to-large size city with 2+ million people in its metropolitan area. Maybe something like Pittsburgh or Cincinnati will come closer to meeting your needs. It's wise to think in practical terms, especially given that America has become increasingly geared towards larger cities.

Last edited by BigCityDreamer; 10-29-2011 at 03:02 PM..
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:13 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,374 posts, read 19,297,224 times
Reputation: 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
You probably realize by now that it's very difficult to find a region with all the things you want. In the U.S., living in a smaller, isolated town/city w/o a car is next to impossible or impractical to be sure. The system is just not built that way here. Also, there's a correlation between the size of a city and how racially diverse it is. Smaller towns and cities are usually much more homogenous (white) in population, especially in northern and midwestern states. Therefore, since you want greater diversity, that's probably not the way to go. Also, cities that small will lack many amenities that you will probably want eventually.

That's why I recommend at least a mid-to-large size city with 2+ million people in its metropolitan area. Maybe something like Pittsburgh or Cincinnati will come closer to meeting your needs. It's wise to think in practical terms, especially given that America has become increasingly geared towards larger cities.
I have talked with a friend from Chicago and she told me to avoid the eastern Midwest when I told her I was interested in Cincinnati. She was almost a bit shocked She has lived in places all over the US because of her job, so I tend to trust in her opinion.

Yes, I know smaller towns are not exactly the essence of the melting pot But I guess a place with, say, 5% minorities is bearable. In many so-called diverse places people don't really mingle anyway, so unless I deliberately moved to, say, a black or Chinese neighborhood I would not really have to do with minorities anyway. Maybe a small city with a smaller percentage of minorities is even less segregated than a big city, conversely better integrated than a big city, provided it is not a racist dump to begin with.
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:18 PM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,195 posts, read 1,925,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post

And even Dubuque will get a train connection to Chicago in 2014 I read somewhere...But it is more spread out so maybe I would indeed need a car there, i.e. it would drop from my list
Yes, there is Amtrak. Not sure about their exact schedules, but I know people who go to school in Chicago and if they took a train home they would have to take one of three trains a week and get off at the closest station to home around 4 am. So I wouldn't count on that too much. Not to mention that the trains are probably more similar to German trains from the pre-WW2 era than an ICE.
You would need a car in either of the three towns and be it just for grocery shopping or an occasional trip to the mall.

Also, don't underestimate the effects of cold weather on your psyche. When you're trapped at home and layers of ice start to grow on the inside of your windows, that can be very annoying. Even more so in a small town with not much else to do than to sit at home.

I think there are many small towns with character out East in New England. Also, there are towns outside of major cities that are not just suburbia but have character as well (Cedarburg being one of them).

PS: I second the PNW, very nice region. Would move there in a heartbeat if I could.
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Old 10-29-2011, 05:39 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,374 posts, read 19,297,224 times
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Some pics of Winona, seems a lovely place

http://v20.nonxt8.c.bigcache.googlea...nal/187012.jpg

http://v22.lscache2.c.bigcache.googl...al/8269726.jpg

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/o...l/52389746.jpg

Last edited by Neuling; 10-29-2011 at 05:48 PM..
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Old 10-30-2011, 10:12 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,226 posts, read 19,525,937 times
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Looks pretty, like a textbook American small town in a hilly area.
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Old 10-31-2011, 02:19 AM
 
Location: White Castle
128 posts, read 185,065 times
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The majority of the south wouldn't work for you, cause you need a car.

I think boston sounds good for you. Its compact with good public transport. Good diversity and great culture. Its a big city, but not nyc type big. The only downside is its expensive.

Here is another suggestion.
Cleveland [not too big, decent transport, and cheap)

Compared to germany just about anywhere in the us is diverse. Atlanta probably has more black females alone than the entire black population of all of germany.

The cheapest place to live in the us is the south. Its also booming. If you were to move to an inner city neighborhood in just about any city in the us you wouldn't need a car.

Good luck, and thanks for coming thru! I hope to one day visit your fine homeland.
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Old 10-31-2011, 09:17 AM
 
1,352 posts, read 690,063 times
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Asheville North Carolina, pedestrian friendly for a southern city. Never been there, but anyone I've talked to who've mentioned moving away always mentioned Asheville. I know nothing about the job market there, but from the outside it appears to have a lot more going for it than many other southern cities of similar size and population.

Portland Maine, never been there, but it's cheap compared to the rest of New England, walkable/pedestrian friendly, up the road from Boston, and a few hours away from Montreal. No idea on job market there, probably as good as Asheville NC.

Sante Fe New Mexico, never been there, cheap, walkable easier than Asheville (not as hilly), job market probably worse than Asheville, Portland Maine.

Portsmouth New Hampshire, look at it on Google Street view, I want to say it looks like a Dutch/English city... either way very European.

Lowell Massachusetts, minutes from Boston, crime is high.

Annapolis Maryland

St. Augustine Florida

Charleston South Carolina, expensive, but high crime.

Savannah Georgia, high crime, poor job market.

Niagra Falls Canada, not USA but if you want diversity, then you'll get it here with the constant streams of tourists.

Last edited by nedergras; 10-31-2011 at 10:30 AM..
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Old 10-31-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,195 posts, read 1,925,319 times
Reputation: 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by BiggDaddyDroid View Post
The majority of the south wouldn't work for you, cause you need a car.

I think boston sounds good for you. Its compact with good public transport. Good diversity and great culture. Its a big city, but not nyc type big. The only downside is its expensive.

Here is another suggestion.
Cleveland [not too big, decent transport, and cheap)

Compared to germany just about anywhere in the us is diverse. Atlanta probably has more black females alone than the entire black population of all of germany.

The cheapest place to live in the us is the south. Its also booming. If you were to move to an inner city neighborhood in just about any city in the us you wouldn't need a car.

Good luck, and thanks for coming thru! I hope to one day visit your fine homeland.
Did you read Neuling's posts at all? He doesn't want to move to a big city, so Boston or Cleveland wouldn't work at all.
I also think it is not true that you don't need a car when moving to an inner city area, taking a few exceptions such as Boston, Chicago, NY or DC aside (and even there it really depends on where you live). I used to live right in downtown Milwaukee (a city of 600,000 people) and it was very difficult to live without a car. Going to the grocery store by public transportation was a pain in the butt even though I lived close to a few major bus lines. Getting out of the city without a car is nearly impossible. But since Neuling doesn't want to move to a big city this is not even important because in 99% of all small towns you are going to need a car.

Not that it matters but there are more black people in Germany than in Atlanta, and a city that is 40% white and 50% black is not something I'd call very diverse. Germany can be very diverse in some places and lilywhite in others, just like the US, and there are plenty of areas in Germany that are more diverse than places in the US.
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Old 10-31-2011, 01:52 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,374 posts, read 19,297,224 times
Reputation: 8487
Makes me wonder, if having a car is basically a must almost anywhere in the US, how do seniors and other people who are not fit to drive survive there?
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