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Old 02-03-2009, 03:03 PM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,950,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
Hardly anyone would live in the North without heat.
Yes, but there has always been heat (wood or coal) in the north. Air conditioning is comparatively new and contributed to recent population disbursement.
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Old 02-03-2009, 03:26 PM
 
542 posts, read 1,290,033 times
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^ Tell that to the millions of inhabitants & natives who settled those areas long before AC was invented.
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Old 02-03-2009, 04:49 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 10,061,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
Yes, but there has always been heat (wood or coal) in the north. Air conditioning is comparatively new and contributed to recent population disbursement.
Without heat (that means without wood or coal), the North would be sparsely populated. It just so happens that heat was around before air conditioning.
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Old 02-03-2009, 07:05 PM
 
1,249 posts, read 2,992,179 times
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Aren't we dancing around the real inequality between Northeast and Sun Belt... the water supply?
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Old 02-04-2009, 10:35 AM
 
91 posts, read 394,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
That's simple...jeez. Those city were able to increase their CITY LIMITS. Empty land = more houses = more people= growth. Those cities aren't built out. That's by far the biggest key here. Some of those cities are finally starting to be built out for the first time in their history. Go look at the population of some of those places using their 1950 city limits.

I think people dwell on this too much without looking at the big picture.

Why are cities in the Midwest and Northeast declining? Because they had 15,000 or more people per square mile in most cases. Large families crammed into small apartments. America got richer, people wanted more space. Suburbs had yards and more bedrooms, more space. The central cities had used all the empty land within their boundries, so the new houses happened to be built in OTHER cities...suburbs. People moved from the city to the suburbs. There were 25 years or so where the central cities were in decline because of this loss to the burbs, but most places are rebuilding those areas with nice condos and retooling themselves to function in the modern era. Out west and down south many cities just increased their limits. The same new houses were and are being built for new families, but they happen to be in the central city.

Everyone talks like the decline in all those cities went straight to the south and west. In most cases they went to the suburbs. The suburban population of all those big cities that shrunk have grown by MILLIONS. Just as they have been since their birth. We're just breaking it down by lines drawn all over the urban areas that we call city limits. They're quite random if you're trying to compare say Houston with Boston.
thanks! im just a young lad who doesnt know his history/geography! thats all! only wondering, i had no idea. people just dont tell you these things in the 6 o clock news ya know?
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Old 02-04-2009, 10:51 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,065,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
^ Tell that to the millions of inhabitants & natives who settled those areas long before AC was invented.
Of course there were people living in these areas pre-AC, but look at the population trends in the southern and the desert/SW states. You'll see a definite corelation between rate of population increase and the advent of widely available residential air conditioning. Many people just wouldn't conisder living in places like Phoenix, Miami or Las Vegas year-round until AC made summers bearable.
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Old 02-05-2009, 08:41 AM
 
11,179 posts, read 22,403,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
First things first, I'll repeat what I said earlier:
...
The city limits of Denver haven't changed much since 1950, except for the annexation of the land upon which DIA is built, plus the "dogleg" out there.
You keep bringing up Denver, but it's not on any of the lists of cities I was discussing.

Aside from that.....just because Denver only annexed the land for the airport doesn't mean that's some exemption. Look at everything they're filling where the old airport was, and in the 1950's the limits weren't built out yet.
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Old 02-05-2009, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Jersey
2,300 posts, read 3,402,804 times
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The growth of suburbs and the migration southwards and westwards are your reasons. The South has become pretty popular because of growing oppurtunity, warmer winters, and the fact that the negative aspects of Southern culture are going the way of the dodo.
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Old 02-05-2009, 09:04 AM
 
414 posts, read 639,984 times
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This is off-topic, but I can't resist posting my favorite quote from a book about Philadelphia written in 1949:

"At all events the ancient saying, 'Once a Philadelphian, always a Philadelphian,' holds good. You can meet them everywhere - Philadelphians - for it is also true that no city sends out more of its sons and daughters, frequently discontented, to the four quarters of the globe, but they seldom change much, and they are always a little homesick, to the great annoyance of their children who know only the outlandish places where they themselves are born."

First, I think the quote is really adorable. But it gets to the fact that Philadelphia really peaked in the 1920s, that Philadelphians tend to have strong local identity (see other comments re: people staying where they're from), the trend towards migration in general, etc.
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Old 02-05-2009, 10:43 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,065,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unstable View Post
This is off-topic, but I can't resist posting my favorite quote from a book about Philadelphia written in 1949:

"At all events the ancient saying, 'Once a Philadelphian, always a Philadelphian,' holds good. You can meet them everywhere - Philadelphians - for it is also true that no city sends out more of its sons and daughters, frequently discontented, to the four quarters of the globe, but they seldom change much, and they are always a little homesick, to the great annoyance of their children who know only the outlandish places where they themselves are born."

First, I think the quote is really adorable. But it gets to the fact that Philadelphia really peaked in the 1920s, that Philadelphians tend to have strong local identity (see other comments re: people staying where they're from), the trend towards migration in general, etc.
Then there is W.C. Fields, whose gravestone epitath read, "On the whole, I'd rather be in Philadelphia."
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