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Old 02-07-2009, 07:46 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,902,786 times
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Something else about poverty in the United States I thought I should bring up...compared to most countries, like for instance, Mexico or India or most places in Africa, impoverished Americans are rich people.
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Old 02-07-2009, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,735 posts, read 23,159,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
  • Americans are very friendly on the surface
  • We make friends easily
  • We drop friends easily
  • We're pretty conservative socially and politically
  • We're pretty religious (we even tend to expect our political leaders to have certain religious values)
  • We admire the rugged individualist, but we're also quick to come to the aid of those in need
  • We don't like to ask for help
  • We like to offer help, but we usually expect to be turned down
  • We're very trusting: most of our homes are not surrounded by walls, and many Americans don't close their curtains at night
  • We value private property, but we don't mind if someone needs to use our driveway to turn around or if neighborhood kids sometimes use our yard as a short cut to school
  • Our public schools are not used to educate the masses so much as they are to foster social engineering and to build self esteem; our public schools are a lot of fun compared to those in other countries
  • We really don't like to argue and would prefer to surround ourselves with people who agree with us and share our values
  • Our national heroes tend to be people who make a lot of money
  • We eat to fill our stomachs, not necessarily to improve our health
  • Television plays a huge role in our everyday lives. Even the poorest Americans have cable TV with 50+ channels.
Now I know why most from other states experience culture shock when they visit CT, NY, NJ and New England.
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Old 02-07-2009, 09:26 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Television

"According to the A.C. Nielsen Co., the average American watches more than 4 hours of TV each day (or 28 hours/week. . . "

NOT 60 hrs per week as shown in the graphic.
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Old 02-08-2009, 02:26 AM
 
895 posts, read 2,145,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Television

"According to the A.C. Nielsen Co., the average American watches more than 4 hours of TV each day (or 28 hours/week. . . "

NOT 60 hrs per week as shown in the graphic.
Yours is average american, the one from the "economist" is doing it by household.
Your link also shows a similar number
"Number of hours per day that TV is on in an average U.S. home: 6 hours, 47 minutes"

Quote:
Household TV viewing means is that the TV is on and at least 1 person is watching, so it's not skewed by the number of people watching at any given time. If the TV is watched heavily on the weekends, that could easily account for half of the hours for the week
However i think the biggest problem is the time used on internet especially for kids playing video games.
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Old 02-08-2009, 03:32 AM
 
Location: rain city
2,958 posts, read 11,353,076 times
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America is such an amazingly wonderful tapestry of color and culture and influence.

George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" epitomizes American culture. I remember hearing an expat a few years ago as he was returning to his overseas job, rhapsodizing about hearing Gershwin in the New York airport on his way out of the country and how proud the music made him and how it symbolized the sound of America for him and how much he connected to and loved that piece of music as the epitome of Americana. That music is home, it is America, it is ours.

George Gershwin was a Russian jew. An immigrant.

Rhapsody in Blue here

YouTube - Gershwin Rhapsody in Blue/ Previn /NHK
conducted by Andre Previn, one 20th century America's most influential symphony orchestra conductors, himself an immigrant....

America's greatness comes from its people, and its people come from everywhere. It is the people from everywhere who have contributed everthing we love about ourselves. I hope it shall always be so.
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Old 02-08-2009, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Dorchester
2,602 posts, read 4,319,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, the stats have changed since I last saw them. It's a bit hard to believe that Americans watch 8 hrs/day of TV, since most of us work 8 hrs (8 1/2 - 9 with lunch), commute to work, and sleep 8 hrs. In addition, you have to spend at least 1-2 hrs eating (which, yes, you can do watching TV), putting the dishes in the DW, doing laundry, etc. There are not 8 hrs left!
Yeah, that stat can't be correct.
It would indicate that for every person who watches 1 hour/day there is another who watches 15 hours/day.
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Old 02-08-2009, 07:40 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Well, another example of how statistics can be manipulated. It's hard for me to believe, period, that the average house has a TV on 60 hrs/week (8 1/4 hrs per day). That would basically mean you never leave home on the weekends, and spend ALL your waking hours watching TV.
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Old 02-08-2009, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,193 posts, read 22,325,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHICAGOLAND92 View Post
America is easily one of the most diverse nations in the world. From Germans to Nigerians, we seem to have a little bit of everything. Immigrants from around the world have retained their culture, while contributing to ours.

I believe this question comes from my lack of traveling abroad (yet), but what exactly is American culture? For example, how can one tell when someone is from the US? What qualities, mannerisms, etc let one know that a person is from America? What makes us different from people in Canada or the U.K.?
The US is highly diverse, but I would say that England tops us.

Anyways, on one hand, American culture is hot dogs, baseball, and cheap beer. On the other hand, American culture is being loud and obnoxious, demanding everything right this minute, buying or wanting things in excess, simultaneously not giving a sh*t about other countries while at the same time believing that it is our God given right to tell the rest of the world how to live even though we do not want our own government to tell us how to live. Ad nauseam on both hands. So, in a nut shell, we have a dualistic culture that contradicts itself at every corner.

As a whole there are very few things that tie us all together except our desire to go big and watch sporting events while worshipping sh*tty bands. But, our culture is divided by region, and even down to states/counties within that region. The West Coast, East Coast, Southern, MidWest, Upper MidWest, New England, North East, etc. are culturally different places. They are all different areas with their own customs, traditions, laws, and ideas of what is considered socially acceptable, etc.




Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
[*]We're pretty conservative socially and politically
Uh, okay. I will agree that the US is a lot more conservative than Rush/Lewis/Beck would have you believe but seriously, I am not sure what America you are talking about with this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
[*]We're pretty religious (we even tend to expect our political leaders to have certain religious values)
Um, once again...okay . Many Americans claim to be religious but it seems that many of us are either complete whack jobs over it or apathetic. So, I strongly disagree that we are 'pretty religious'. I mean you can't do a half-a$$ed job with believing in a theology.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
[*]We admire the rugged individualist, but we're also quick to come to the aid of those in need
It's the older generation that seems to admire the rugged individual and coming to the aid of those in need totally depends on the need and where you live.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
[*]We like to offer help, but we usually expect to be turned down
I would correct this to we prefer to be turned down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
[*]We're very trusting: most of our homes are not surrounded by walls, and many Americans don't close their curtains at night
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOk Yeah, and we all leave or windows open and doors unlocked at night, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
[*]We value private property, but we don't mind if someone needs to use our driveway to turn around or if neighborhood kids sometimes use our yard as a short cut to school
Once again, this depends on where you live, but most Americans do not appreciate anyone cutting through their yards. Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't it legal to shoot somebody in Texas if the enter onto your property?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Most countries in Europe have a higher rate of binge drinking and alcoholism than the US.
Most European countries (all?) do not have the same stigma attached to drinking as we do in America and Europeans tend (not all, mind you) to drink on more occasions than Americans, but, binge drinking is rare. Of course it depends on the country, but they just don't drink everything in sight for two or three days like many (young) Americans do unless there is a reason to celebrate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesbabe View Post
Being American is all about CHOICES. And, hey, guess what? Many countries don't have much of THAT.
Yes, many countries do lack the 'freedom of choice' but do not get on a high horse about it; many countries also have many freedoms of choice as well.



The easiest ways to spot Americans over seas are:
1--As stated by a previous poster, the way that we dress, in particular the brands and style of clothes.
2--Americans tend to casually discuss the 'culture' of what ever country that they happen to be in while forgetting one simple fact; that at least half the people within earshot understand the English language. I have overheard some pretty ridiculous comments by Americans who assumed that no one else could understand them.
3--Americans are absolutely convinced that everyone and everything is out to rip them off.
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Old 02-08-2009, 02:24 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33058
Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Most European countries (all?) do not have the same stigma attached to drinking as we do in America and Europeans tend (not all, mind you) to drink on more occasions than Americans, but, binge drinking is rare. Of course it depends on the country, but they just don't drink everything in sight for two or three days like many (young) Americans do unless there is a reason to celebrate.
Here are some articles about binge drinking in Europe. It is a very common problem, worse in some countries than others.

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ireland, Finland and England Have Europe's Biggest Binge-Drinking Problems

Binge Drinking and Europe
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Old 02-08-2009, 02:45 PM
 
895 posts, read 2,145,413 times
Reputation: 358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, another example of how statistics can be manipulated. It's hard for me to believe, period, that the average house has a TV on 60 hrs/week (8 1/4 hrs per day). That would basically mean you never leave home on the weekends, and spend ALL your waking hours watching TV.
No, the average american household is 2.6 people (japan 2.8)
NationMaster - Average size of households (most recent) by country

So its basically showing that in other countries the people will watch the TV more at the same time, while americans have the TV on more in their house. The average american household has the "tv on more" thats all it's really showing. While the parents are gone for example the kids could be watching TV for who knows how long.

Here you can see which US state has the highest average and lowest size of household (this data is more recent the above one) Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitors sites is not allowed

But i think TV watching dated anyways, now it should be time spent on the internet..

Last edited by Yac; 02-24-2009 at 07:16 AM..
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