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Old 02-10-2009, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,237,245 times
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For me personally, the furthest North I could live would be Washington DC. Its still below the Mason Dixon line, and the weather is not unbearable. But any further north than that? Forget it!

And South- well pretty much anywhere but Florida. Except maybe Jacksonville.

The rest is too far South to be Southern, lol
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:47 PM
 
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The furthest north I could live has to do with climate as well as latitude. I could live in Oklahoma, but I couldn't live in Flagstaff even though Flagstaff is around the same latitude. Oklahoma/Tennessee winters are the coldest I would want. Nowhere in the continental United States is too far south.
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Old 02-16-2009, 09:22 AM
 
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While not a tropical paradise, St. Louis is mild in comparison with cities further north in the midwest. High temps average in the mid-30s to around 40 in the winter. It gets some snow (around 20 inches per year average) but the most of the horrendous winter weather and generally dreary conditions stay north of STL. On a fairly regular basis, the city also gets warm fronts from the south that can raise temps into the 50s and even 60s at times. Snow rarely stays on the ground for more than a few days at a time. During the winter and early spring, it is not uncommon for STL to be 15-20 degrees warmer than places like Chicago, Mpls., and Milwaukee.
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Old 02-16-2009, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Midwestern Dystopia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Central Illinois 1 View Post
While not a tropical paradise, St. Louis is mild in comparison with cities further north in the midwest. High temps average in the mid-30s to around 40 in the winter. It gets some snow (around 20 inches per year average) but the most of the horrendous winter weather and generally dreary conditions stay north of STL. On a fairly regular basis, the city also gets warm fronts from the south that can raise temps into the 50s and even 60s at times. Snow rarely stays on the ground for more than a few days at a time. During the winter and early spring, it is not uncommon for STL to be 15-20 degrees warmer than places like Chicago, Mpls., and Milwaukee.
St Louis is another one, very good suggestion, I consider MO mostly a midwest state although I know some areas are more southern but I think of St Louis as a midwest city and if you look at the monthly avg. temps. St Louis avgerages 9-15 degrees warmer than Milwaukee EVERY month, including winter. This means it's also alot warmer in summer but St Louis is noticably warmer and underrated in that respect during winter.

I also agree with Denver, yes , Chicago/Milw. can have some days when it's warmer like we had recently (50's) but Denver gets that and warmer consistently in winter. much better IMO.
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Old 02-16-2009, 05:45 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,584 posts, read 10,933,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Compared to the NE or midwest, Denver has quite mild winters. It can be 65 on Christmas Day. It can also snow 10" on Christmas. The first freeze is usually in early Oct., the last in early May. The first snow can come as early as Sept and as late as May. I've seen snow in June twice in the metro area in 29 yrs of living here. There are weeks of warm, sunny weather between the snowfalls. Right now it is 50 degrees here; it was in the high 60s at the end of last week. We've had some 70 degree days this winter thus far.

Denver has recorded snow in every month of the year. It has also recorded 75 degrees or higher in every month of the year. IMO summers are too hot, but winters are delightful.
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Old 02-16-2009, 05:58 PM
 
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DC, Baltimore and Philly's weather have been up and down all winter and may vary week to week and day to day. Last week, temps were in the 20's and then they jump to the 50's. Go figure!
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Old 02-16-2009, 10:41 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,908,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Central Illinois 1 View Post
While not a tropical paradise, St. Louis is mild in comparison with cities further north in the midwest. High temps average in the mid-30s to around 40 in the winter. It gets some snow (around 20 inches per year average) but the most of the horrendous winter weather and generally dreary conditions stay north of STL. On a fairly regular basis, the city also gets warm fronts from the south that can raise temps into the 50s and even 60s at times. Snow rarely stays on the ground for more than a few days at a time. During the winter and early spring, it is not uncommon for STL to be 15-20 degrees warmer than places like Chicago, Mpls., and Milwaukee.
With the Upper Midwest, yes, St. Louis is mild. However, in the winter, snowfall and temperatures in St. Louis are not unlike most of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Kansas, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Columbus, and Cincinnati all see winters with around the same temperatures with the same amount of snowfalls. And a fairly regular basis? Try like once a month maybe. This February has been unusually mild. Last year St. Louis received 5 good snowfalls and temperatures were much colder this time of year. I disagree about the horrendous weather conditions staying north of STL. If what you are defining is the horrendous I'm thinking of, most of that stays to the north of Interstate 80. St. Louis' winters are also a month shorter than the cities you described above. It's winters are typical for a Lower Midwest city (the Lower Midwest being Missouri, most of Illinois, Indiana, and most of Ohio.)
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Old 02-16-2009, 11:23 PM
 
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While they may not be what most would consider truly mild, winters in many coastal locations in southern New England might well fit the description of "surprisingly mild" considering how harsh many people might assume that winters would be anywhere in New England. Thanks to the ocean's tempering effects, places like New London, Ct; Newport, RI; and Chatham, MA (on the southern shore of Cape Cod, right at the elbow), as well as the islands off the southern coast--Block island, Nantucket, and Martha's Vineyard--have average mid-winter highs just a couple of degrees below forty and average lows of around twenty, or a couple of degrees above twenty in some cases. Even Provincetown, on the end of Cape Cod, due east of Boston's southern suburbs, has similar winter temperatures. By contrast, inland cities in southern New England, Hartford and Springfield for example, have average mid-January highs in the low to mid thirties and lows in the teens.

The coldest temperatures last longer in the interior as well. Those average highs in the mid thirties and lows in the teens will last for two solid months in the interior cities referred to, from late Dec. to late Feb. Not only do the southern coastal locations average several degrees warmer than the interior during the coldest time of the year, but that coldest stretch lasts a substantially shorter time, running from about the end of the first week in January to mid-February. The winters along much of New England's southern coast are more similar to Philadelphia's than to the typical picture of Yankee winters.
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Old 02-17-2009, 07:07 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,869,909 times
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Good lord Steve-O, when will you ever accept that most people think that Chicago is cold in the winter, and have a pretty good reason for doing so.

Before you hurl your 'wimp' or 'you haven't been here long have you' comments at me, let me remind you that I happen to like cooler weather, and have lived in the Chicago area for over thirty years.

To answer the original question. I'd have to go with Denver, I didn't realize until I met someone from Denver who had moved to Chicago and complained about the cold that their winters were as mild as they were.
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Old 02-17-2009, 10:29 AM
 
767 posts, read 1,828,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
With the Upper Midwest, yes, St. Louis is mild. However, in the winter, snowfall and temperatures in St. Louis are not unlike most of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Kansas, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Columbus, and Cincinnati all see winters with around the same temperatures with the same amount of snowfalls. And a fairly regular basis? Try like once a month maybe. This February has been unusually mild. Last year St. Louis received 5 good snowfalls and temperatures were much colder this time of year. I disagree about the horrendous weather conditions staying north of STL. If what you are defining is the horrendous I'm thinking of, most of that stays to the north of Interstate 80. St. Louis' winters are also a month shorter than the cities you described above. It's winters are typical for a Lower Midwest city (the Lower Midwest being Missouri, most of Illinois, Indiana, and most of Ohio.)
The cities I named are north of I-80 (Chicago, Minneapolis, and Milwaukee). If you compare winter temps in say Minneapolis with St. Louis, the average HIGH temp in Mpls. is oftentimes lower than the average LOW in St. Louis. The 20 inches of snow that STL receives is less than half of the average snowfall that even Madison, WI gets in an avergae year. Believe me, I lived in Green Bay for 8 years and in STL most of my life before that and the winters in STL are nothing compared to what Green Bay gets. I also spent 3 years in Lexington, KY and the weather there is much more comparable to what STL gets in the winter.
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