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Old 02-10-2009, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
3,940 posts, read 13,336,486 times
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Pacific Northwest or a desert at night.
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:11 AM
 
3,326 posts, read 7,747,699 times
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Most places that get cold will get at least as much snow as Kansas City, which only averages 20 inches or so a year. I find KC snow "storms" very tolerable. It's only inconvenient to drive in a day or so at a time (if that), then the roads are pretty much clear. All in all, it might add up to about a week or two of difficult driving, which is tame by most cold-weather standards.

Cold doesn't really exist in Little Rock. I don't know what you mean by cold, but anything further south than KC doesn't really get cold that much.
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:28 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,998,915 times
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Nashville
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Old 02-11-2009, 10:45 AM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,937,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
Most places that get cold will get at least as much snow as Kansas City, which only averages 20 inches or so a year. I find KC snow "storms" very tolerable. It's only inconvenient to drive in a day or so at a time (if that), then the roads are pretty much clear. All in all, it might add up to about a week or two of difficult driving, which is tame by most cold-weather standards.

Cold doesn't really exist in Little Rock. I don't know what you mean by cold, but anything further south than KC doesn't really get cold that much.
KC is also quite far south in latitude as well. That means seasonal daylight changes are not very pronounced at all.
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,056 posts, read 30,520,596 times
Reputation: 10490
Quote:
Originally Posted by bls5555 View Post
I have come to the conclusion that I LIKE the cold of Winter. I do NOT like driving around in snow.

We had a very mild winter here in Kansas City this year, but last year it seemed like it snowed every weekened.

Can anyone give me some areas where it is a definited 4 seasons, but the snow doesn't come down all that much?

Would a place like Des Moines, IA or Little Rock, AR fit the bill?
You may have heard of a little town called New York City. We fit the 'four seasons' bill here. And we don't get a lot of snow.
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
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I think that the 4 seasons and little snow kind of doesn't work. You can get almost 4 seasons and little snow or 4 seasons and a little more snow than you want.
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Old 02-11-2009, 01:16 PM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,936,915 times
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How cold is cold and how much snow is not much? Des Moines gets much colder than Little Rock. When I lived in Minneapolis is was very, very cold, but we didn't get a lot of snow (at least compared to Massachusetts). It's all relative. When I lived in New England, any snowfall that was measured in inches rather than feet was "light."

If you don't like snow you should avoid a city on the Great Lakes or in New England.
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Old 02-11-2009, 01:40 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,724,856 times
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Albuquerque, NM has winter high/low averages of about 45/20, so is on the warmer end of the spectrum but is still a 4-season climate. It snows about 10 inches per year and the snow almost always melts off by midday. There is usually plenty of snow in the mountains to the east of the city so you can have your cake and eat it, too.

ABQConvict
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,851 posts, read 5,587,759 times
Reputation: 1723
It's not unusual for it to get down into the 20's in Atlanta in the winter and already this year the city has had several days where it barely made it (or didn't) above freezing. But very rarely does it snow. We did get light flurries in January this year but no accumulation.
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:19 PM
 
Location: still in exile......
29,910 posts, read 8,613,353 times
Reputation: 5904
Tok, Alaska. 30 inches of snow a winter and it can get to -75 in Winter.


J/k......seems like Nashville or Louisville fits your bill.
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