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Old 02-16-2009, 07:55 AM
 
3,234 posts, read 7,629,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KE111691 View Post
Yes I have! In fact, I have spent a whole month in Rochester, NY. Just enough to know how the people talk, treat one another, and live; just enough to have gone to Wegmen's five different times; just enough to have looked in the phone book to see what all is there; just enough to go around most of the area and see the culture; just enough to get home sick and know that that area is for me; and just enough to know that the North is nothing like South, in fact it is worse than the South!
wow, an entire month. You sure are an expert! You must have not gotten around much. There is a world of selection when it comes to food. What do you have down there that you can't get up here?
Not to mention all of the mom and pop grocery stores scattered around the area giving you more than 2 selections for grocery stores.
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Old 02-16-2009, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
2,447 posts, read 6,654,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tidewater50 View Post
I think what the op is thinking is that the South is becoming less country. When an area grows it attracts people from all over not just natives. The culture of any urban area in any region isn't going to be the same as the culture in the rural areas nearby. The rural areas are going to have the traditions associated with that particular region, while the urban areas are going to have a mixture of cultures.
Quote:
Originally Posted by silviodante2 View Post
It's strange. I live around Raleigh now, but am originally from the Northeast. A lot of native Southerners associate the newly-built neighborhoods, new shopping centers, new everything with being "Northern." However, coming from the Northeast, these type of new and shiny, dynamic developments remind me of the South. When I think Northern, I think of old, somewhat beat-up buildings and dreary shopping centers.

I think the problem is that people have it too ingrained in their heads that Southern = poor, working-class and Northern = rich, white-collar. Cities like Raleigh, Charlotte, Atlanta may be getting more Northerners, but they are not becoming like Northern cities, they are a distinctly new creation-- part of the New South, which definitely has a feel to it wholly independent of the North.

I think there is a general universal American culture that virtually all people under 40 now follow. This transition from regional to the dominate American culture happened way long ago in the North, any working-class neighborhoods in Boston, NY, etc. with accents are the exception. No one finds it worthy of reporting that some kid in Newton, Massachusetts doesn't say "pa'k the cah". But, the loss of regional Southern culture to the generic American culture is recent, so people have noticed it. The South isn't becoming more Northern, its just becoming more "American" and less
regional.
Excellent posts! As NC native I'm always amused when people say that the South isn't Southern. Really? Compared to what? Stereotypes? Pre-conceived ideas?

I think many people think all Southerners have a deep Mississippi or Georgia accent. When they don't hear that they say "No one here has a Southern accent!". My family has lived in NC for many generations. I know many other natives that can say the same. If we don't have a NC accent (therefore a Southern accent) what do we have?

I'm not sure where the op has visited or what city he/she is using as a reference point. In my experience, many of the things he/she have stated are not true.
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Old 02-16-2009, 09:14 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,866,572 times
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I don't think that the south is getting less 'southern'. Culture is fluid and changes over time so 'southern' might simply look a bit different twenty years from know than it looked twenty years ago, and this is happening in the south and in the north. In fact, I think that there are many parts of the north that are adopting southern traditions. Has anyone noticed that McDonalds is selling sweet tea? I've not tried it as I loathe sweet tea (too northern I guess), but I see that as an example of the blending and changing of cultures.

I don't see regional culture or accents dying out anytime soon in the US (members of my own family, who are younger than I, sport regional accents), but I do see that they will change over time, because culture is not static, and that is what it does.
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Old 02-16-2009, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers-Naples-Marco Island
28 posts, read 41,474 times
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The north wasn't always what it was today. It used to be much more rural and less cosmopolitan. After receiving waves and waves of immigrants and becoming the population base for the U.S this began to change it into what it is today. I think that is what is happening to the south now, many immigrants are moving there and it has become the most populated region of the U.S. Since so many different kinds of people are moving there it is changing the traditional culture of the south.
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Old 02-16-2009, 09:57 AM
 
3,597 posts, read 7,705,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Soul Food is the BEST in the south, as well as BBQ. You guys can have everything else, but those two things is something no other region in the country can touch us in (ok, maybe the midwest).
If I'm going to touch BBQ, it should be Brazilian or Thai BBQ.

As for soul food, I wouldn't touch that. I'm not obsessed with health but there are limits to the amount of fried food and lard I can take with food.
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Old 02-16-2009, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 12,151,524 times
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Since you are such a "sophisticate," you should really broaden your horizons and try Korean barbeque too.

And sorry, but a lot of "soul food" is not fried, and lard is not a required ingredient.

Ever hear of good old fashioned mac-n-cheese? No lard or frying to be found there.
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Old 02-16-2009, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Living in Hampton, VA
502 posts, read 1,405,371 times
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I admit soul food is good but too much fried food and collard greens, mixed with cornbread, and yams is a heart attack waiting to happen.
BTW okra is some nasty s%!t but I love some fish and grits, shrimp and grits, and fried oysters,
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Old 02-16-2009, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 12,151,524 times
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I used to hate okra as a child. My mom made the stewed-with-tomatoes variety, yuck!

As an adult however, I have grown to LOVE good, fresh fried okra.
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Old 02-16-2009, 11:43 AM
 
969 posts, read 2,605,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldwine View Post


Sweetheart, the south is not and never will be known for good food. The north is the epicentre of all things "food" related in this nation-- gourmet food, restaurants, delis, cultural diversity, et cetera.

You can't even get good bagels outside of NYC.
From your post, it appears to me the only thing you can only get up north & not down south is some good 'ole condecension.

Sugar.
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Old 02-16-2009, 11:56 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,113,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
I used to hate okra as a child. My mom made the stewed-with-tomatoes variety, yuck!

As an adult however, I have grown to LOVE good, fresh fried okra.
I too remember being a bit of the same way when growing up, JohnATL. Not really sure why, but maybe it was one of those things (like buttermilk) a kids' taste buds just doesn't accept...?

As it is though, fresh cut okra fried up properly (especially along with a pot of black-eyed peas and crisp cornbread) is a combination that will make almost any Southerners' mouth water!
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