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Old 10-13-2012, 08:01 PM
 
3 posts, read 2,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
I used to work with a guy (in Massachusetts) who seemed to really believe that average highs in Norfolk in January were in the 80's.
How could anyone think that nonsense, not even Miami or Key West average high temperatures in the 80s in winter .Heck Norfolk doesn't even hit highs of 80s until April at the earliest and for the last 80 temperatures late October at the latest. Does your co worker have Norfolk Virginia mixed up with the Norfolk Islands? Caracas barely averages 80s in the SUMMER,and that bozo worker of yours thought Norfolk had that in winter. What is this world coming to
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Old 10-13-2012, 10:42 PM
 
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Tallahassee, Florida - gets quite a few nights below freezing
Flagstaff, Arizona - completely different climate then Phoenix

The higher elevations of Los Angeles or San Diego - go inland 20 miles, it's a completely different world
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Old 10-14-2012, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Miss Jankins (Say nothing bad).
1,236 posts, read 1,430,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterRabbit View Post
I was in Columbia, SC for army boot camp. It was very cold and we had to keep coal going in the furnaces. In January it snowed. We had Puerto Ricans in the company. They put their hands over their heads, broke formation and ran for cover.
QUOTED FOR TRUTH! Late at night when we were sleepin, the drill sergeant wasn't the only one creepin at Ft. Jackson! The hawk was also creepin! It was as cold as a motha! I was an exodus soldier. I was there in the dead of winter. I thank goodness that I was able to qualify with my weapon. I did well that day, despite the cold. After AIT at Ft. Gordon, I was sent to Ft. Wainwright in Fairbanks, Alaska!
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Old 10-14-2012, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,350,040 times
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Everything in-between the Potomac River and Daytona Beach.
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:51 PM
 
192 posts, read 202,720 times
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Nashville is really just a warmer version of Toronto's climate.
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,367,851 times
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Marfa and Alpine Texas, just north of Big Bend National Park, get very cold, below freezing every night in winter, with overnight lows often below zero. Average overnight lows in October are mid-40s and January mid-20s, just 50 miles from the Mexican border.
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Old 10-18-2012, 01:46 PM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,744,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billlsk7326362407UP View Post
How could anyone think that nonsense, not even Miami or Key West average high temperatures in the 80s in winter .Heck Norfolk doesn't even hit highs of 80s until April at the earliest and for the last 80 temperatures late October at the latest. Does your co worker have Norfolk Virginia mixed up with the Norfolk Islands? Caracas barely averages 80s in the SUMMER,and that bozo worker of yours thought Norfolk had that in winter. What is this world coming to
I never asked my co-worker where he got the idea that highs in Norfolk during the winter were typically in the eighties. I suspect that the answer is summed up in this quote:

Quote:
Originally Posted by CurlyFries View Post
Everything in-between the Potomac River and Daytona Beach.
I've encountered quite a few people who did not have nearly as much interest in geography as many who post on forums like this one have. Lacking that interest, a lot of people just don't know the facts, but go with general perceptions. One of those general perceptions I've encountered is that the southern regions of the U.S. are really warm all year. To someone with that mis-perception, any place located far enough south to fit that person's perception of "down south" is assumed to have beach weather all winter. It's just a lack of knowledge about this particular subject.

That's why I quoted CurlyFries's post. That sums it up well. To people who aren't interested enough in geography to know the facts, who have the misconception that all places "down south" except maybe up in the mountains are warm all year, the entire territory CurlyFries describes is an area that some people who lack knowledge in this area may perceive as having a warmer winter than the area really has. Really, the only places with "surprisingly cold winters" are locations that are surprisingly cold to some individuals. Those would be individuals who know little enough about those areas so that they always kinda pictured warmer winter climates than those locations actually have. If you know the facts, it's not surprising how brisk the winters can be even deep into the South.
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Old 10-20-2012, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,350,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
I never asked my co-worker where he got the idea that highs in Norfolk during the winter were typically in the eighties. I suspect that the answer is summed up in this quote:



I've encountered quite a few people who did not have nearly as much interest in geography as many who post on forums like this one have. Lacking that interest, a lot of people just don't know the facts, but go with general perceptions. One of those general perceptions I've encountered is that the southern regions of the U.S. are really warm all year. To someone with that mis-perception, any place located far enough south to fit that person's perception of "down south" is assumed to have beach weather all winter. It's just a lack of knowledge about this particular subject.

That's why I quoted CurlyFries's post. That sums it up well. To people who aren't interested enough in geography to know the facts, who have the misconception that all places "down south" except maybe up in the mountains are warm all year, the entire territory CurlyFries describes is an area that some people who lack knowledge in this area may perceive as having a warmer winter than the area really has. Really, the only places with "surprisingly cold winters" are locations that are surprisingly cold to some individuals. Those would be individuals who know little enough about those areas so that they always kinda pictured warmer winter climates than those locations actually have. If you know the facts, it's not surprising how brisk the winters can be even deep into the South.
This. I used to think everything below the Potomac River had Miami's weather myself until sometime in 2009.
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Old 10-20-2012, 04:18 PM
 
Location: IN
20,866 posts, read 36,011,334 times
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The upland elevated regions of the southern Appalachians. Crossville, TN, on the Cumberland Plateau at 1800ft elevation, has recorded lows as cold as -23F as recently as 1985. It just proves that even places that are very far south in latitude, 35N, can get quite cold in the winter.

Last edited by GraniteStater; 10-20-2012 at 06:55 PM..
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Old 10-20-2012, 05:55 PM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,744,103 times
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One place that does not get really cold but still sometimes gets cooler than some might expect is Hawaii at lower elevations. Of course it gets pretty cold on the upper slopes of the highest mountains, two of which are over 13,000 feet, but what might surprise some people are record lows in the low 50's in Honolulu. Even average lows in Honolulu during winter are in the mid 60's.

Up here where I live in the Northeast, lows in the 60's in the middle of summer feel comfortably cool, and are sometimes described by the weathermen as "good sleeping weather." It wouldn't surprise me if people who lived in Hawaii year-round and were used to its tropical climate might find that a bit chilly, and wear sweaters or light jackets outside at night. In any case, while not cold, even the average wintertime lows in lowland Hawaii are a bit cooler than many might expect.
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