U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-19-2007, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,427,207 times
Reputation: 1171

Advertisements

if you want affordable, you have to get off the coasts.

the interior states are much more affordable (for the most part)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-19-2007, 07:35 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,864,128 times
Reputation: 1668
Not necessarily so. Often in the interior states the wages don't match the price, or there are not jobs to be had in the towns with 'affordable' housing. This is a problem that it seems certain people seem hell bent denying (probably because they benefit economically from said denial).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2007, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,794,610 times
Reputation: 4901
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_pines View Post
Thanks for the optimism Crew_Chief. Its getting crazy out there. It makes me think of endentured servants and peasents in the medieval times. With lordships holding the quality land and everyone else ending up in all the crappy spots. Oklahoma will probably grow ten fold if prices keep up. Maybe its my reality that is messed up. But I hear my uncles and grandpas stories about buying a home and a new car while doing what would be considered mundane jobs today. None of them were college graduates. But they worked hard and were good people. Thye wouldnt take advantage of others. They usually gave lots away. Its like that isnt enough now. None of them house flipped either to get a nice home. That just seems like it makes it even harder for the next generation. More wealthly people are buying up land now more than ever. Its become the hottest commodity and it has the most control over people's lives anything. There are plenty of areas that arent heavily populated but the trend has been to set prices in those areas now due to their desirability. So entire areas of the country are being cut off. The truth is I will work any ob that pays enough for me to make a living for my family. Somebody has to do those jobs. College graduates have their place but not without the others. They are one in the same and go hand in hand. You cant have one without the other. Those ways are obsolete. There is already so much time cut out of family relationships thats why the quality of family life has deteriorated so much. That and prices rising has had a huge impact on family stability.

Nice to see that someone else recognizes this. Don't be surprised if one day people who can't get anywhere wake up and start targeting the "wealthy" owners and the whole system breaks down. The only reason the USA has become so successful was due to a powerful middle class. Lose that and it's time for another civil war. The interesting thing is how much wealth is centered in areas with danger, like California and Florida. "The big one" could overturn this trade in nonsense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2007, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Michissippi
3,116 posts, read 7,156,568 times
Reputation: 2055
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Nice to see that someone else recognizes this. Don't be surprised if one day people who can't get anywhere wake up and start targeting the "wealthy" owners and the whole system breaks down. The only reason the USA has become so successful was due to a powerful middle class. Lose that and it's time for another civil war. The interesting thing is how much wealth is centered in areas with danger, like California and Florida. "The big one" could overturn this trade in nonsense.
I'm not as optimistic about the prospects for a middle class or lower class revolt. Rather, I think that the sheeple will end up being assuaged and calmed by the politicians', the pundits', and the media's claims that the economy is doing very well and that the job market is booming and that more education is the solution to our problems. The sheeple will blame themselves for not doing so well, and even though they might go to college and train for non-existent jobs, they'll blame themselves for not being good enough. Over time, standards and expectations will decrease and the nation will become a third world country, similar to a South American country. You don't see the Brazilians revolting, do you? So why do you think modern Americans would revolt? Heck, middle-America can't even mount a political revolt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2007, 07:45 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,864,128 times
Reputation: 1668
Where is this 'middle America' I always hear about that optimizes all that is wrong with this country?

I do sadly concur with the possibility of your assertion though, I've always felt that the Horatio Alger myth has done more damage to this nation than most would admit, causing everyone to clamor for scrapes and welcome exploitation with wide arms (hoping one day they will reap the benefits of said exploitation even though they never will) in the misguided notion that everyone has equal opportunity afforded to them by the simple act of being born on American soil. Having seen some of the worst neighborhoods in this country and read a fair amount on the constructs of class and class mobility, I don't buy it for a second.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2007, 10:36 AM
 
Location: NY to FL to ATL
612 posts, read 2,544,139 times
Reputation: 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
Where is this 'middle America' I always hear about that optimizes all that is wrong with this country?

I do sadly concur with the possibility of your assertion though, I've always felt that the Horatio Alger myth has done more damage to this nation than most would admit, causing everyone to clamor for scrapes and welcome exploitation with wide arms (hoping one day they will reap the benefits of said exploitation even though they never will) in the misguided notion that everyone has equal opportunity afforded to them by the simple act of being born on American soil. Having seen some of the worst neighborhoods in this country and read a fair amount on the constructs of class and class mobility, I don't buy it for a second.
I do believe that everyone has equal opportunity here.

I grew up in a great household where I had every advantage possible. My parent paid completely for me to go to college and get my degree. Bought an apartment house for me to live in free after I graduated, etc.

On the other hand, my husband grew up in Jamaica (enought said), was smuggled here and grew up in inner city Miami. Did not get to go to college when he was younger. Worked his way up through the company he works for and makes just under six figures, whereas the most I have made is 50,000 working for someone. We put our pennies together and started buying real estate and are looking at retiring by 40.

We struggled with our first few houses and gave up dining out and great cars, etc but we made it work. I think that you need a lot of willpower to do some hard things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2007, 04:21 PM
 
6,981 posts, read 4,454,261 times
Reputation: 5141
Houses are priced by supply and demand.

If someone purchases one of those overpriced houses for 400k (when the house should be 100k) than its worth 400k.

Believe it or not, if all the 400k houses in America went 'on sale' for 100k, you'd see quite a few 'investors' writing 10 checks for 100k each and buying as many as they could. Then, they'd rent em all out and collect income.

If every 400k house was on sale for 100k, they'd have to hold a lottery to determine who got the rights to purchase them.

So, if there was a lottery, someone would say, "hey, i'll give you 105k for it" and wallah, instantly 100k is gone. Then, someone might say, "Well, i can beat 105, i'll give you 110"
And so on....until it reaches 400k.

Houses are overpriced because people have been able to buy them without coming up with the money.

Lets say you went to dinner at Mcdonalds and your burger, fries and drink cost 5 dollars. You'd take out 5 bucks and pay. You WOULDNT say, "can i give you a dollar now and owe you 4?"

MOrtgage companies are the reason houses are so expensive. If there was a law that said, "no one is allowed to lend anyone money for any reason" than people, in order to purchase a house, would have to write a check for the entire amount on the spot. There wouldnt be too many people writing checks for 400k.

Basically, the way the system is set up, is REALLY bad for people who are multimillionaires. Those people can write a check for any reasonable amount and buy their house. But, the system is set up so that 99% of the population who can't otherwise afford a home, are basically given money from a 3rd party. And, recently, mortgage companies are making it easier and easier for joe nobody to be able to afford a million dollar property..and thats why the prices have skyrocketed......because any Tom, Richard, or Harry can get a loan with no money down and average credit.

Until, things change, houses will be ridiculously inflated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2007, 05:57 PM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,987,755 times
Reputation: 991
Well with the crack down on creative financing and tightening standards, alot less people will be able to take a loan so house prices will drop alot. Probably wont see $400k houses become $100k, nothing this extreme
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2007, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Burlington, VT
483 posts, read 1,781,422 times
Reputation: 259
Here in Boston, $200,000 will buy a shack deep in the woods (with an outhouse) or a studio in a very dangerous neighborhood.

The worst part about the subprime mortgage boom was that it pushed housing prices so high. My parents, a teacher and an insurance agent, were able to buy a house. I wonder if I (a nurse-to-be) and my husband (a file clerk) will be able to buy one. I don't want to live in the woods again, and I refuse to live in a neighborhood where I have to dodge bullets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2007, 03:33 AM
rdw
 
20 posts, read 83,802 times
Reputation: 13
Hello.
I keep reading the term "afordable housing" in here, but can't find out which states or any real estate sites... I've seen my range housing (100k) in NY state, but the taxes are 5k a year. Is that as good as it gets?
Frantically looking, have 2 months to move.
Thanks anyone.
Wasn't it John Lennon who said we're still peasants as far as he could see?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top