U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: TEXAS VS FLORIDA--Which state would you prefer to live in?
Texas 275 56.35%
Florida 213 43.65%
Voters: 488. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 01-29-2017, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,094 posts, read 3,410,813 times
Reputation: 7765

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
I have to agree here.

Florida's major cities have become very bland, especially when compared to Texas cities. Orlando, Tampa, and Jacksonville are devoid of culture, have no distinct vibe, and doesn't really differentiate from one another on a larger scale. You can easily tell when you're in Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, Houston and etc. because the vibe is different in each city.
Much of that is transplants which largely only move because warm weather/beaches and not much else. Weather alone is a superficial reason to move somewhere. But the long time locals from those cities are a different story. They actually root for their home teams and have more local pride. Miami's a different ballpark. Its filled more with immigrants than with transplants, and those immigrants have children that grow up in the city and give the city a more distinct identity. I never knew that many transplants in Miami. I knew plenty of people from Cuba, Colombia, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and people whose parents came from there, but not as many US born people who came from up north when they were much older, so a lot of people you meet in Miami, are actually from Miami which gives it a unique distinct identity.

I don't agree when people say Miami is "not southern." Its very urban, (yet you still got the Redlands and Homestead) and it has a Latin-American vibe, but none of those things are exclusive from Southern. They just make it distinct, just like French Cajun/Creole culture has made New Orleans and southern Louisiana distinct. You can ask my fifth grade teacher, an African-American woman from Miami, if she's still alive, how Miami was back then in the 50s and 60s. Socially, no different than Atlanta was.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-29-2017, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,517,361 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Much of that is transplants which largely only move because warm weather/beaches and not much else. Weather alone is a superficial reason to move somewhere. But the long time locals from those cities are a different story. They actually root for their home teams and have more local pride. Miami's a different ballpark. Its filled more with immigrants than with transplants, and those immigrants have children that grow up in the city and give the city a more distinct identity. I never knew that many transplants in Miami. I knew plenty of people from Cuba, Colombia, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and people whose parents came from there, but not as many US born people who came from up north when they were much older, so a lot of people you meet in Miami, are actually from Miami which gives it a unique distinct identity.

I don't agree when people say Miami is "not southern." Its very urban, (yet you still got the Redlands and Homestead) and it has a Latin-American vibe, but none of those things are exclusive from Southern. They just make it distinct, just like French Cajun/Creole culture has made New Orleans and southern Louisiana distinct. You can ask my fifth grade teacher, an African-American woman from Miami, if she's still alive, how Miami was back then in the 50s and 60s. Socially, no different than Atlanta was.
Southern is a culture that Florida has loooong diverted away from. Most people that live here don't have roots in the south and because of the Southern backwards social tendencies we don't feel the need to Identify with it. Our ancestry is mostly German, Irish, Scandinavian, Slavic, Cuban, Puerto Rican, etc. most of our families fought for the union or hadn't arrived to America yet. most of us don't give a thought to your religion or your personal life unlike the South which practically prides itself on being nosey into people's personal lives.

No, Miami isn't Southern. The whole Florida peninsula isn't Southern, and it doesn't want to be. Since you left Florida mind your own business as to how we identify ourselves.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2017, 08:55 PM
 
Location: FL
65 posts, read 77,595 times
Reputation: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post

No, Miami isn't Southern. The whole Florida peninsula isn't Southern, and it doesn't want to be. Since you left Florida mind your own business as to how we identify ourselves.
Miami is most definitely NOT southern!
BUT the panhandle and all the way across the big bend to Jacksonville sure is!!!
Southern by the grace of god!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2017, 05:44 PM
 
252 posts, read 395,442 times
Reputation: 164
Initially my response would be none of the above.. I don't like either of these states there both none my favorites. But If I had to choose one of the two I would go with Texas. I understand that Florida has it charms with the nice white sand beaches , the Everglades park. I guess Miami is a posh trendy party metropolitan area if your into that. The main problem is that everyone moved there (florida) to escape the cold and now its over crowded. But at the same time Texas enduring the same fate with transplants from everywhere in the US most of the latter mainly fleeing from California and illegal immigration from Mexico.

Last edited by 7stringguitarguy; 02-06-2017 at 06:49 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2017, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Tampa
686 posts, read 402,806 times
Reputation: 584
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I don't agree when people say Miami is "not southern." Its very urban, (yet you still got the Redlands and Homestead) and it has a Latin-American vibe, but none of those things are exclusive from Southern. They just make it distinct, just like French Cajun/Creole culture has made New Orleans and southern Louisiana distinct. You can ask my fifth grade teacher, an African-American woman from Miami, if she's still alive, how Miami was back then in the 50s and 60s. Socially, no different than Atlanta was.
It's like you've never been to Miami, or Florida in general. There's a saying in South Florida - Go north to visit the south.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2017, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,890 posts, read 3,010,861 times
Reputation: 3429
Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
Florida and Texas are very similar. I found almost no difference between living in Dallas and Orlando/Miami when it came to religiosity. Also, it doesn't sound like OP will be living in the rural areas of Texas, so this really is a nonissue. And unless you're living in Miami, Orlando, or Tampa, the rural areas of Florida are pretty similar, both in the panhandle and peninsula (Ocala, around Okeechobee, Ft Myers, etc.)
I think this is accurate. I think their rural areas are similar and other than Miami, their larger cities are similar.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2017, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,517,361 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
I think this is accurate. I think their rural areas are similar and other than Miami, their larger cities are similar.
Except that you aren't accurate. Jacksonville might kind of be like a smaller Dallas, but it is actually more like a smaller Atlanta on the beach. You aren't going to find anything like Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Florida Keys, or any of the other large metros along Florida's peninsular coasts similar to Texas, rural or urban.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2017, 01:48 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,245,015 times
Reputation: 2222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
Except that you aren't accurate. Jacksonville might kind of be like a smaller Dallas, but it is actually more like a smaller Atlanta on the beach. You aren't going to find anything like Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Florida Keys, or any of the other large metros along Florida's peninsular coasts similar to Texas, rural or urban.
Jacksonville isn't like Atlanta or Dallas. I'd say Orlando & Tampa (minus the bay & beaches) shares some similarities with those 2 cities. I do agree you won't find Miami or the Florida Keys in Texas.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2017, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,517,361 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Jacksonville isn't like Atlanta or Dallas. I'd say Orlando & Tampa (minus the bay & beaches) shares some similarities with those 2 cities. I do agree you won't find Miami or the Florida Keys in Texas.
Dallas and other Texas cities still have a strong Southern culture element that Tampa and Orlando don't really have. Baptists everywhere, much more conservative politics, different ancestries and ethnic groups in the cities (Texas hispanics are mostly Mexican, in Florida cities it is Puerto Rican and Cuban and lots of other things), etc.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2017, 04:02 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,245,015 times
Reputation: 2222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
Dallas and other Texas cities still have a strong Southern culture element that Tampa and Orlando don't really have. Baptists everywhere, much more conservative politics, different ancestries and ethnic groups in the cities (Texas hispanics are mostly Mexican, in Florida cities it is Puerto Rican and Cuban and lots of other things), etc.
If you're referring to the overall "metros" in Texas vs. Florida, then yes I agree to a certain degree. But individual cities -- say the city of Tampa vs. the city of Dallas, then no. There is not a strong Southern culture in Dallas, maybe a bit more-so in Houston. Even then, Houston is one of the most international cities in the country.

The Dallas-side of DFW is religiously diverse with many that are not religious, while the Fort Worth-side is filled with Baptists. San Antonio is predominately Catholic. Conservative politics are a suburban and rural thing in Texas, not in the urban areas.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top