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Old 12-30-2009, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
14 posts, read 19,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nebat View Post
If you were to calculate the miles from the northern tip of Maine to the southern tip of Florida, Virginia is dead center on the east coast, slightly north of center. In my opinion perfectly mid-atlantic. Though VA is historically southern, undeniable, much has changed with DC having a major influence over a large portion of the state. There is a mix of northeast attitudes in the cities and laid back(southern) attitudes in the country.

On another note I have never heard of Texas being considered southern until I ventured onto this web site. Geographically it's a mid-west/plains state. It's also such a massive state that it pretty much has it's own culture. But if we're going to insist on using the civil war as a divider then I guess it is southern. BTW, using a boundary set up to divide the country 150 years ago doesn't seem to progressive to me. Why can't people move on?
I have never been to Texas, but I had always considered it be to southern along with Oklahoma. Haven't even been to Oklahoma either.

The majority of battles in the Civil War took place in the South, it will always be a reminder of what happened here. I don't think using the Civil War to divide the states being Northern or Southern is non progressive (or what ever point you are trying to make). Makes perfect sense because each region in the US has it's own unique culture.
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Old 12-30-2009, 10:51 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,925,014 times
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Are you talking about the most people in the state or the most people per square mile. My question would be which state in the South has the most people per square mile.

http://www.datamasher.org/mash-ups/people-square-mile

Isn't Maryland technically in the South. Just put your curser over the state and further statistics come up for that state. I looked for a list, but have not found one yet. Sorry, I have no more time for searching right now.

I believe I remember North Carolina is 10th in population but it is only 16th in population per square mile.

Last edited by NCN; 12-30-2009 at 11:17 AM..
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Old 12-30-2009, 11:02 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,296,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Are you talking about the most people in the state or the most people per square mile. My question would be which state in the South has the most people per square mile.
I would guess a smaller state with a larger population...Florida or Maryland.
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Old 12-30-2009, 11:11 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,144,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Not everyone is progressive or even wants to be progressive. Plus borders of things can sometimes be long-lasting.

Granted I would tend to consider Texas to be separate, but the Eastern part is Southern and I guess I could see it. The idea Oklahoma is "The South" is something I've mostly only seen here, but many here are extremely insistent on it. I don't think this has anything to do with the war either as Oklahoma was not a state then. My guess is that it's the cultural factors. Oklahoma is "Bible Belt", more or less, and that's seen as an exclusively Southern thing.
Good post, Thomas!

One of the factors that seems to "divide" over what states are Southern and which are not seems to fall along a certain default notion that one must be totally one or another.

No one would exclude Mississippi or Alabama or Georgia from the South, of course. But really, there is not necessarily a logical historical reason why the deep southeast must be the measure of how "Southerness" is compared and/or considered.

BUT...let's just say it is, for arguments sake. In that case, then one must also consider that the same would apply to bordering regions in terms of state regional affiliation. That is to say, for instance, that for Oklahoma or Kentucky to be considered Midwestern, then they must, respectively, have the same exact traits as Kansas or Ohio. Or, in the case of Texas, to be "West" then it would be a duplicate of Colorado.

None of this is true, however. All the above mentioned states (Texas, Kentucky and Oklahoma) have MUCH more in common with the undeniable Southern states than with the undeniable Midwest or Western states in just about all considered indices which "measure" such things.

On a related tangent, Texas is a bit of a unique case. Its history and culture are of absolute Southern roots and origins. However, what has confused the issue over the years -- and multi-faceted it -- is wrapped in the whole concept of the "Southwest."

Because New Mexico and Arizona also consider themselves "Southwestern", the term has blurred over the years to where many outside of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona, tend to think of these four states as being part of one coherent region to be labeled as Southwest.

They aren't and never really have been. Two completely different "Southwests" to the point the "pairs" themselves don't even see themselves as sharing any common bond of culture and history. Texas (and to a lesser extent, Oklahoma) are southwest as in the western part of the South. Where the essential South blends strongly with the western frontier aspects. On the other hand, New Mexico and Arizona are southwest in the sense of the southern part of the true West. Nothing "Southern" about them.

I think it is safe to say that the majority of folks in New Mexico and Arizona feel no sense of "regional brotherhood" with Texas and Oklahoma. And vice-versa. If anything, it is actually hostile in some regards, and involves a resentment that the duo's might even be considered of the same "southwestern" breed! LOL

Oh well, let me stop rambling on! LOL

Last edited by TexasReb; 12-30-2009 at 12:26 PM..
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Old 12-30-2009, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in the universe
2,161 posts, read 3,995,551 times
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I've always heard of Texas being considered southern and southwestern. I have roots in the state and for me, part of it is very much southern.
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Old 12-30-2009, 01:29 PM
 
631 posts, read 1,078,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Texas is usually considered south. After that it's Florida, North Carolina and Georgia.
I thought GA was ahead of NC
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Old 12-30-2009, 01:41 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,296,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RudeBoy21 View Post
I thought GA was ahead of NC
It is...GA is 9th, NC is 10th.
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Old 12-30-2009, 02:25 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,144,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovely95 View Post
I've always heard of Texas being considered southern and southwestern. I have roots in the state and for me, part of it is very much southern.
Where 'bouts are you from in Texas, Lovely? Just curious!

In any event, I agree with you. In fact, will go much further in that I can't think of much of Texas which is not essentially Southern. The trans-pecos, yeah...and perhaps the area north of Amarillo. Far south Texas, maybe could be considered in a different light...but this is a relatively recent anamoly...

Texas --as a whole -- properly belongs to the South if one accepts the premise that "the South" can be defined as a part of the country -- South Central and Southeast -- which shares a common historical and cultural bond which, in and of itself, is easily differientiated from the Northeast, Midwest, or Far West.
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Old 12-30-2009, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in the universe
2,161 posts, read 3,995,551 times
Reputation: 1434
Mainly way out in east Texas(have to talk to my mother about where around there), but just by going to relatives that have been there for generations when I was a child, it just feels southern to me and I have been all over the south. So when people say that Texas is definitely no southern at all, it makes me feel like how would they know if they have never had the same or similar experiences as I have.
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Old 12-30-2009, 09:11 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,925,014 times
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Texas must be Southern. When we lived for a short time in Colorado, people were forever asking us if we were from Texas. The North Carolina mountain accent and the Texas accent are very much alike.

We all know Texas girls are the best. Hate to admit that.

Oh, and I find it very funny that one of the posters thinks everybody in the South has to be alike to be Southern. The South has a lot of different cultures combined into what some call Southern. I haven't seen a map lately describing the different sections of the country, but I am sure wikipedia has some.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_United_States

I think the census map on here would be the official Southern map. Southern is a region of the country. It has many cultural differences.

Although it is not a state, the area that has the most people per square mile is the District of Columbia. Maryland is next for the population density and Florida is third. That is in the South.

Now if you are wondering which Southern States have the most representatives here is some really good information from 2008. It is a little different from the 2005 map someone posted. And I have never seen a population pie chart before. That is wild!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._by_population

Nine states have half the population of the entire United States. I didn't know that until I looked at the pie chart. North Carolina is the 10th state in population and it is the first state on the left side of the pie chart. The written chart proves this also.

Last edited by NCN; 12-30-2009 at 09:59 PM..
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