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Old 11-08-2014, 07:01 AM
 
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Had to post this!


Southern Accents (By Tim Wilson) - YouTube
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Old 11-08-2014, 07:12 AM
 
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i run into people all the time who graduated HS in the South but have parents from the northeast...those people usually have no accent. I find it funny when yankees move down here and try to talk southern..then you ask where they are from and they say buffalo...oh but i have lived here since 89. Nothing like hearing a person from Michigan say y'all with their movie Fargo accent.

Well, I heard some junk once that the national news folks are best when they are from the midwest...honestly, being from the northeast and watching the news channels down here in NC, having a strong local accent for me discredits the whole program. with the accent comes the whole demeanor, etc. You don't hear the anchors on NY1 with a Brooklyn accent...maybe the cooking show program guy, or the traffic guy, but not the anchors or weather people...
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Old 11-08-2014, 07:14 AM
 
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Default seen it before

believe it or not they kinda sound like pockets of people up in northern NH and VT. They still call horses "hauses"
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Old 11-08-2014, 12:54 PM
 
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I graduated from a Northwest Raleigh high school a few years back, maybe a good ten miles from RTP. At this high school, I often wondered who the true NC natives were because barely any of the students had strong southern accents. I can't tell you how many kids from Florida and New Jersey I went to high school with, being completely serious. It was a diverse school, but it definitely makes sense for the Research Triangle area. I guess southern accents aren't necessarily dying out, but they've changed a lot among the younger generations of the Triangle. Due to the influx of transplants, mainly from the northeast, these younger generations are speaking in an "east coast accent" with a hint of southern thrown in. This makes sense, even if the drawl wasn't quite there, everyone still said "y'all" at my high school. Apparently it's a similar story up in Richmond and Northern Virginia, wouldn't be surprised if Charlotte was included, too. It was interesting, because MANY of my high school teachers came from all these small, remote, eastern NC towns. They definitely had the accent! But the kids from the suburbs of Raleigh, not so much.

Long story short, I think it's more of an urban vs rural matter. Rural NC, no question the accent is still strong and visible. Go a good 30 miles out of the Triangle in any direction, you'll hear some accents. A ton of accents inside the Triangle, too. However, for the most part in the Triangle among the younger generations, the accent has changed and sounds more neutral.
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Old 05-30-2015, 12:29 AM
 
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The most grating and annoying Southern accent is the Appalachian: that "Waw-tch it, Skeeter, tha daawgs undur da tru-uck!" trailer park, screechy twang that you see parodied in cartoons and such. It is mostly predominate in middle to eastern Tennessee and to a lesser extent in Appalachian parts of surrounding states such as southern Kentucky and West Virginia. Couple that with the fact that, in rural TN (hell, only a couple miles outside of Nashville), a sizable portion of all white people under the age of 40 or so are face and neck tattooed, meth-addled "white trash" that are living out Three 6 Mafia/Insane Clown Posse/ghetto thug fantasies while trolling pharmacy counters for decongestant medicine. So mix that influence in and you have possibly the worst accent in spoken English.

Now, imagine that accent demanding percocets and xanax while sitting in a Rascal mobility scooter with a thumb over one's tracheostomy stoma, and you've envisioned a mere sliver of the cornucopia of patients I experienced while working as a pharmacy technician for several years in Hermitage, TN.

On the flip side, I think many people find that "Chaal-ston, SC" drawl of the Coastal and Deep South (popularized by characters such as Foghorn Leghorn and Tom Hanks's character in The Ladykillers) to be very pleasing, myself included.

Anyway, here's a good map that I found on an older thread that is fairly relevant to the discussion:

Last edited by NikkiBO; 05-30-2015 at 01:06 AM..
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:02 AM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,268,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NikkiBO View Post
The most grating and annoying Southern accent is the Appalachian: that "Waw-tch it, Skeeter, tha daawgs undur da tru-uck!" trailer park, screechy twang that you see parodied in cartoons and such. It is mostly predominate in middle to eastern Tennessee and to a lesser extent in Appalachian parts of surrounding states such as southern Kentucky and West Virginia. Couple that with the fact that, in rural TN (hell, only a couple miles outside of Nashville), a sizable portion of all white people under the age of 40 or so are face and neck tattooed, meth-addled "white trash" that are living out Three 6 Mafia/Insane Clown Posse/ghetto thug fantasies while trolling pharmacy counters for decongestant medicine. So mix that influence in and you have possibly the worst accent in spoken English.

Now, imagine that accent demanding percocets and xanax while sitting in a Rascal mobility scooter with a thumb over one's tracheostomy stoma, and you've envisioned a mere sliver of the cornucopia of patients I experienced while working as a pharmacy technician for several years in Hermitage, TN.

On the flip side, I think many people find that "Chaal-ston, SC" drawl of the Coastal and Deep South (popularized by characters such as Foghorn Leghorn and Tom Hanks's character in The Ladykillers) to be very pleasing, myself included.

Anyway, here's a good map that I found on an older thread that is fairly relevant to the discussion:
Interesting map, but the Greensboro/Winston-Salem area doesn't belong in the light green shade like Charlotte and Raleigh/Durham. Or, for that matter, the entire I-85 corridor in North Carolina from Charlotte to Raleigh/Durham. Go to towns like Salisbury or Burlington and you're going to hear some thick accents and encounter few transplants. I went to college in Greensboro for a few years, and interacted with many natives. I'll tell you, people still have strong accents in those areas unlike the Research Triangle where I'm originally from. You'd think they were from some super rural area, but they were from Greensboro or Winston suburbs which surprised me. Even younger folks fitted the bill. Go to an area like North Raleigh or Cary and that's not the case.

Last edited by JayJayCB; 05-30-2015 at 08:34 AM..
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:06 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Tennessee, around Gatlinburg has very strong southern accents. Also most of AL.
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Old 05-30-2015, 04:10 PM
 
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Rural NC accents are as thick as any other region in the South.
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Old 05-30-2015, 04:12 PM
 
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The Richmond area on the map should be light green.
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Old 05-30-2015, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NikkiBO View Post
The most grating and annoying Southern accent is the Appalachian: that "Waw-tch it, Skeeter, tha daawgs undur da tru-uck!" trailer park, screechy twang that you see parodied in cartoons and such. It is mostly predominate in middle to eastern Tennessee and to a lesser extent in Appalachian parts of surrounding states such as southern Kentucky and West Virginia. Couple that with the fact that, in rural TN (hell, only a couple miles outside of Nashville), a sizable portion of all white people under the age of 40 or so are face and neck tattooed, meth-addled "white trash" that are living out Three 6 Mafia/Insane Clown Posse/ghetto thug fantasies while trolling pharmacy counters for decongestant medicine. So mix that influence in and you have possibly the worst accent in spoken English.

Now, imagine that accent demanding percocets and xanax while sitting in a Rascal mobility scooter with a thumb over one's tracheostomy stoma, and you've envisioned a mere sliver of the cornucopia of patients I experienced while working as a pharmacy technician for several years in Hermitage, TN.

On the flip side, I think many people find that "Chaal-ston, SC" drawl of the Coastal and Deep South (popularized by characters such as Foghorn Leghorn and Tom Hanks's character in The Ladykillers) to be very pleasing, myself included.

Anyway, here's a good map that I found on an older thread that is fairly relevant to the discussion:
Is this map basically saying that the Appalachian Twang the strongest Southern accent of all. That's interesting to me.
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