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Old 02-22-2009, 07:12 PM
 
1,193 posts, read 1,560,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
... DC is the closest big city to Richmond, so it's where Richmonders will naturally go for big-city shopping, dining, sports, etc.
Yep.
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,235,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrinceTheo View Post
Yep.
Actually, its Norfolk.
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
657 posts, read 1,311,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
Actually, most Richmonders I know go over to Norfolk. Thats the closest big city.


By the gap between Richmond and DC- I simply mean there is really nothing between Richmond and DC. They are not culturally linked at all.


But thats besides the point. We are 75 mi from the NC line. At least 90 miles to the DC area.

We are closely linked culturally with Eastern NC. Dosent matter if theres not a major city in Eastern NC. Richmond and its residents have been from NC for many years.


Also, whos to say DC is really a Northern city? To me its the Gateway to the South ,while Richmond is the first real Southern city. So DC to me is just a Mid-Atlantic city that poses no threat to Richmond.
You do comprehend that as the US gets more cosmopolitan, developed and diverse, your make-believe version of history and culture in Richmond becomes less and less relevant to future generations?

All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain...
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
1,734 posts, read 5,059,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexus View Post
I hope so. The quicker that this country can diminish or even eliminate the southern states from any influence, the better this country will be. We've been anchored down by this region for too long.
I love how somebody always has to try to turn a thread like this into a bash fest. How can you say that a country is being anchored down by an entire region. If anything, the south is one of the few things keeping this country afloat. If the sun belt wasn't there for all of the northerners with frozen toes to migrate to, then they would all be in Mexico and the Caribbean spending their money and paying taxes over there.
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:28 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,268,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Nobody is saying that Atlanta demolished all of its historic building. That would be silly. However, it's true that urban renewal in particular resulted in significant losses--more than a handful. I guess we disagree on exactly how much was lost. Everything I've read about the history of preservation in Atlanta, which come from reputable sources, tells me that it was more than just a few buildings that were lost.
Read some of those sites I linked earlier...they might give you a different perspective. Which noteable buildings do you know of that were lost to urban renewal? Most of those projects took out neighborhoods like large parts of Pittsburgh, Summerhill, and Mechanicsville - demolished due to I-85, I-75, and I-20 and stadium construction...but these neighborhoods were already largely slums.

MARTA construction caused some demolition of buildings - most noteably the Eisman Building, the facade of which was reconstructed inside Five Points Station. MARTA also required that Union Station be demolished.

Construction of Centennial Olympic Park replaced several blocks of warehouse/commercial buildings that were deemed unworthy of preservation. Woodruff Park construction caused the 1972 demolition of a row of nondescript commercial/retail buildings on Peachtree Street.

Many historic buildings burned down...this was during the era prior to sprinkler system requirements and when fire fighting was less efficient, so it wasn't uncommon for buildings to burn. The Aragon Hotel, the Grand Opera House, the Loew's Grand, Paramount, and Forsyth Theaters, the Terminal Hotel, Hotel Ansley - all burned. I'm sure there are others...

So...that leaves:
1. Terminal Station - demolished for the MLK Jr. Federal Building
2. Kimball House - replaced by a parking deck in 1959
3. Piedmont Hotel - demolished for the 1971 Equitable Building
4. Henry Grady Hotel - demolished for the cylindrical Westin Peachtree...ironically, the Grady Hotel replaced the former Governor's Mansion in 1924
5. the original Equitable Building - demolished for a Trust Company Bank tower
6. Carnegie Library - replaced by the brutalist Breuer-designed Main Library
7. Downtown YMCA - demolished in the 90s after it was determined that the building was damaged beyond reasonable repair
8. original Atlanta City Hall - demolished in 1885 for the Georgia State Capitol
9. the Customs House - replaced by the Fulton National Bank Building

Those are most of the buildings, to my knowledge, that have been demolished. Honestly, many Atlanta residents don't even know about the large number of historic buildings sitting in Downtown and Midtown. I wasn't aware of it until I got interested in history and preservation a few years ago, and now I guess I would consider myself fairly knowledgeable on that subject.
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,235,877 times
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May I ask why everyone here is bashing Richmond?

My ancestors would be rolling in their graves by some of what is said. I will have you all know that sweet tea flows through my very veins. I am a 12th Generation Richmonder.
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:31 PM
 
1,193 posts, read 1,560,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
Actually, most Richmonders I know go over to Norfolk. Thats the closest big city.
Norfolk and D.C. are about the same distance from Richmond. I don't even consider Norfolk a big city (no offense).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27
We are closely linked culturally with Eastern NC. Dosent matter if theres not a major city in Eastern NC.
Doubt it. lol
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,235,877 times
Reputation: 402
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrinceTheo View Post
Norfolk and D.C. are about the same distance from Richmond. I don't even consider Norfolk a big city (no offense).



Doubt it. lol
Well, whatever. Norofolk is bigger than Richmond, thats for sure.

Some people laugh at Richmond being called a "city" To people from Chicago, NY, and Atlanta, Richmond is a large town.

You must read about the history of Richmond and its cultural ties to Eastern NC then.
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:39 PM
 
1,193 posts, read 1,560,378 times
Reputation: 305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
May I ask why everyone here is bashing Richmond?

My ancestors would be rolling in their graves by some of what is said. I will have you all know that sweet tea flows through my very veins. I am a 12th Generation Richmonder.
Nobody is really bashing Richmond, if you read the majority of the posts. Its the simple fact Vasinger that
1. You say the same things over and over again.
2. You ignore what other posters say and don't provide reputable evidence to back what you're saying.
3. You neglect to paint the whole picture when describing things.
4. You say the same things over and over again.

You're ok, just chill out
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:40 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,326,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
Actually, most Richmonders I know go over to Norfolk. Thats the closest big city.
Richmond and Norfolk are practically the same size. The Hampton Roads metro is a little larger than the Richmond metro, but they're still in the same league. I'm sure Richmonders venture over to Norfolk for various reasons, but for the most part, what you can find in one (in terms of shopping, sports, etc.), you can find in the other. The obvious exception would be the beach.

Quote:
We are closely linked culturally with Eastern NC. Dosent matter if theres not a major city in Eastern NC. Richmond and its residents have been from NC for many years.
Yes, but that's not what you generally think of when you think of "influence"--which is what we were discussing.
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