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Old 02-21-2009, 08:11 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,327,947 times
Reputation: 2698

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
Hartford is also on a river but that is all. I cant believe anyone would compare the two. Apples and oranges.
Richmond is urban and has a relatively dense urban fabric because it experienced significant growth prior to the age of the automobile; in that sense, it does have something in common with many Northeastern cities that also developed in similar fashion. Now in terms of vibe and culture they may be different, but in terms of physical form, there are similarities. I know you'd probably rather die than admit that, but it's the truth.

That's why I'm somewhat puzzled that you feel that Atlanta feels like a Northeastern city. For its size, Atlanta isn't all that dense. Take a similarly-sized metro area like Philadelphia or Boston. The built environments and urban fabrics stand in stark contrast in many ways.
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Old 02-21-2009, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,236,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Richmond is urban and has a relatively dense urban fabric because it experienced significant growth prior to the age of the automobile; in that sense, it does have something in common with many Northeastern cities that also developed in similar fashion. Now in terms of vibe and culture they may be different, but in terms of physical form, there are similarities. I know you'd probably rather die than admit that, but it's the truth.

That's why I'm somewhat puzzled that you feel that Atlanta feels like a Northeastern city. For its size, Atlanta isn't all that dense. Take a similarly-sized metro area like Philadelphia or Boston. The built environments and urban fabrics stand in stark contrast in many ways.
Its obvious you dont know a whole lot aboot Richmond. Richmond absolutely did not grow before the automoblie. It was a town, hardly a city at all ! Most of the city did not stretch past The Robert E. Lee statue. It all looked and felt like a large town, rather than a city. For the South it was a city, but compared to the North, it was large town.

There was a large tobacco field right where Stonewall Jackson is sitting.


Northern city, my Aunt Fanny!



The city is nothing like a Northeastern city. Have you even bothered to look at the pictures? The city just oozes South. Everything aboot Richmond is Southern. From the large white columned mansions on Monument Ave, to the dogwood and magnolia trees and the kudzu that grows in the local cemeteries.

In fact, before the advent of the AC, Richmond was almost unbearable from June through September.

My great grandaddy would come home from the office downtown- his celluloid collar glued to his neck. People in Richmond took naps during the afternoon.

Ironically, Atlanta when compared to Richmond, with its skyscrapers and such looks much more like a typical NE city.

Atlanta was much more a "boom town" than Richmond ever was. And had much more Northerners after the war.

Actually much of Richmond is spread out. It has beautiful white columned mansions on Monument Ave and Victorian Row Houses in the Fan. Charleston and Savannah have Row houses too, I guess they must be Northeast cities.

Richmond once you hit the city limits, its all sprawl and suburbia. Thats typical of a Southern town.
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Old 02-21-2009, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,236,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by back2dc View Post
Richmond reminds me of Hartford, Connecticut -- with highways that bisect both cities from the North/South (95 vs 91) and East/West (64 vs 84). Very similar skylines with similar styled-architecture.
I guess people in Hartford sound like Richmonders too, since you're so convinced the 2 cities are so much alike.


YouTube - A Very Richmond Phone Call
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Old 02-21-2009, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
657 posts, read 1,311,325 times
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Richmond is not a town. It's quite a decent-sized city and the state capital! Just like Hartford! The cities are so alike now. I'm surprised I've never made the connection before. It's irrefutable.

Hartford = Richmond and Richmond = Hartford. There are even tobacco fields in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, just outside of Hartford. You see them by the highway, just like you see outside of Richmond.
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Old 02-21-2009, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,236,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by back2dc View Post
Richmond is not a town. It's quite a decent-sized city and the state capital! Just like Hartford! The cities are so alike now. I'm surprised I've never made the connection before. It's irrefutable.

Hartford = Richmond and Richmond = Hartford. There are even tobacco fields in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, just outside of Hartford. You see them by the highway, just like you see outside of Richmond.
I guess Louisville , KY must be a Northern city since it is North of Richmond

WAAAAAA??:

You do not see Tobacco Fields in CT. Do you see Cotton there too? 'Cause it grows outside of Richmond.
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:00 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,327,947 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
Its obvious you dont know a whole lot aboot Richmond. Richmond absolutely did not grow before the automoblie. It was a town, hardly a city at all ! Most of the city did not stretch past The Robert E. Lee statue. It all looked and felt like a large town, rather than a city. For the South it was a city, but compared to the North, it was large town.
Richmond experienced significant growth before the era of the automobile--significant for that particular area. You make my point when you say that "for the South it was a city." In terms of its built environment, Richmond was relatively dense before the 40's and 50's, and more importantly, it didn't experience a big growth spurt afterwards that led to a lot of demolition of historic structures like Atlanta and Charlotte.
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
657 posts, read 1,311,325 times
Reputation: 503
Kudzu is not native to the South. It is from Japan.

Kudzu is an invasive species and is now in New England:

IPANE - Catalog of Species Search Results (http://nbii-nin.ciesin.columbia.edu/ipane/icat/browse.do?specieId=23 - broken link)
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,236,140 times
Reputation: 402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Richmond experienced significant growth before the era of the automobile--significant for that particular area. You make my point when you say that "for the South it was a city." In terms of its built environment, Richmond was relatively dense before the 40's and 50's, and more importantly, it didn't experience a big growth spurt afterwards that led to a lot of demolition of historic structures like Atlanta and Charlotte.
I fail to see your point. Richmond actually has preserved historic Victorian Row Houses. You can see those in Charleston/Savannah

One could look at any city in the South and see a few similiarites to Northern cities. That doesnt mean Richmond is not a truly Southern city. It truly is Southern.

I guess NC is not the South because Richmond is only 75 mi from the NC line.
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,236,140 times
Reputation: 402
Quote:
Originally Posted by back2dc View Post
Kudzu is not native to the South. It is from Japan.

Kudzu is an invasive species and is now in New England:

IPANE - Catalog of Species Search Results (http://nbii-nin.ciesin.columbia.edu/ipane/icat/browse.do?specieId=23 - broken link)

Kudzu cannot survive in New England. It needs a warm climate.


Richmond is a city in the Upper South. So is DC.

You live in the South and if that bothers, you , why not move to the North?

They'll be happy to have you.
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
657 posts, read 1,311,325 times
Reputation: 503
That article specifically said that Kudzu is in New England. It's an invasive species that was brought to the American South from Japan to prevent soil erosion.

It has proliferated and moved up the Eastern Seaboard into Richmond, Paterson, NJ and now New England.
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