U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-21-2009, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 3,236,655 times
Reputation: 402

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by back2dc View Post
That article specifically said that Kudzu is in New England. It's an invasive species that was brought to the American South from Japan to prevent soil erosion.

It has proliferated and moved up the Eastern Seaboard into Richmond, Paterson, NJ and now New England.
Virginia is a Southern state. Richmond is a Southern city

Im done!

GOODBYE!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-21-2009, 09:42 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,331,660 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
I fail to see your point. Richmond actually has preserved historic Victorian Row Houses. You can see those in Charleston/Savannah
My point is that early, significant growth before the age of the automobile, coupled with relatively slow-to-average growth at the advent of the age of the automobile and afterwards lended itself to preservation of much of the built environment and thus the historic character of Richmond.

Let's look at it this way: in 1900, Atlanta was the nation's 43rd largest city with 90K people; for the sake of comparison, Richmond had 85K people and was the 46th largest city in America. By 1940, Atlanta's population had more than tripled to 302K, becoming the nation's 28th largest city; in that same year, Richmond had 193K persons and was the nation's 45th largest city. So clearly, Atlanta also experienced significant growth prior to WWII and the age of the automobile. However, Atlanta continued to grow and grow and grow and suburbanization/urban renewal took Atlanta, as well as many other cities across the nation, by storm, leading to the demolition of lots of historic structures. Compared with Northern/Midwestern cities, there wasn't a large amount to begin with, so a significant portion of Atlanta's historic urban fabric was lost during those years. That growth, as it continued, also led to large amounts of people from the South and other regions of the country moving there. So those two factors, extensive razing of the historic built environment (not totally of course, but a lot of it was lost) and high migration levels, led to a dilution of sorts of Atlanta's highly pronounced Southern legacy--both physically and culturally. Richmond lacked those two factors; thus it still has a more intact historic Southern legacy in place, physically and culturally.

Quote:
One could look at any city in the South and see a few similiarites to Northern cities. That doesnt mean Richmond is not a truly Southern city. It truly is Southern.
I never argued that it wasn't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2009, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
657 posts, read 1,311,526 times
Reputation: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
Virginia is a Southern state. Richmond is a Southern city

Im done!

GOODBYE!
Ciao! But before you do leave, do remember that both Virginia and Richmond voted for Obama. Politically, culturally, geographically, Virginia is firmly a mid-Atlantic state, just like New Jersey, Maryland and Pennsylvania.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2009, 09:48 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,003,989 times
Reputation: 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
Im afraid it does. Obama represents everything that concurs with NE Liberals. Socialism, National Health Care, Elitism, Arrogance...

The South usually votes Conservative/Republican (Sometimes "Southern Democrats_ but those are few and far between today). And the South in general has different issues that matter to them. More about Religion, and Freedom of Religion, small government, etc.

But I dont want to get off subject, lol
Not always. There are a lot of old-money Southerns who attend liberal churches (Episcopalian, Presbyterian, etc) They are very Southern, but tend to be social moderates or liberals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2009, 09:50 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,331,660 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Not always. There are a lot of old-money Southerns who attend liberal churches (Episcopalian, Presbyterian, etc) They are very Southern, but tend to be social moderates or liberals.
This is true. When SC had its proposition banning gay marriage on the ballot a few years ago, the city of Charleston--historically known as a religously tolerant city--actually had a majority of residents vote against the amendment than for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2009, 10:06 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,273,490 times
Reputation: 2783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
And how is Richmond not Southern? I feel Richmond is much more Southern than Atlanta.

BTW. We're getting off topic.

I didn't say Richmond isn't southern...I was responding to your statement that reads, "Atlanta is NOT southern!". Atlanta is certainly a southern city...I only posted a few photos, but there are hundreds more on flickr that prove my point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2009, 10:11 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,273,490 times
Reputation: 2783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
My point is that early, significant growth before the age of the automobile, coupled with relatively slow-to-average growth at the advent of the age of the automobile and afterwards lended itself to preservation of much of the built environment and thus the historic character of Richmond.

Let's look at it this way: in 1900, Atlanta was the nation's 43rd largest city with 90K people; for the sake of comparison, Richmond had 85K people and was the 46th largest city in America. By 1940, Atlanta's population had more than tripled to 302K, becoming the nation's 28th largest city; in that same year, Richmond had 193K persons and was the nation's 45th largest city. So clearly, Atlanta also experienced significant growth prior to WWII and the age of the automobile. However, Atlanta continued to grow and grow and grow and suburbanization/urban renewal took Atlanta, as well as many other cities across the nation, by storm, leading to the demolition of lots of historic structures. Compared with Northern/Midwestern cities, there wasn't a large amount to begin with, so a significant portion of Atlanta's historic urban fabric was lost during those years. That growth, as it continued, also led to large amounts of people from the South and other regions of the country moving there. So those two factors, extensive razing of the historic built environment (not totally of course, but a lot of it was lost) and high migration levels, led to a dilution of sorts of Atlanta's highly pronounced Southern legacy--both physically and culturally. Richmond lacked those two factors; thus it still has a more intact historic Southern legacy in place, physically and culturally.



I never argued that it wasn't.
Actually, Atlanta has been very good about preserving historic buildings. There are a few noteable structures that have been lost, but for the most part the significant historic buildings are still standing. There are 3 large neighborhoods Downtown (several blocks) of historic buildings, the oldest built in 1869.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2009, 10:30 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,331,660 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Actually, Atlanta has been very good about preserving historic buildings. There are a few noteable structures that have been lost, but for the most part the significant historic buildings are still standing. There are 3 large neighborhoods Downtown (several blocks) of historic buildings, the oldest built in 1869.
Compared with what it had before the era of urban renewal, what was lost constituted something of a sizable chunk of the historic stock that the city had, which was small compared to Northern cities--which is why the effects of urban renewal and the like are more acutely felt in Atlanta than in the city's Northern counterparts, which also experienced the same. The preservation sentiment in Atlanta didn't gain serious traction until the 70's and 80's. I found some relevant information concerning the subject:

Quote:
The pace of destruction quickened dramatically after World War II as dozens of downtown buildings were demolished for parking lots and garages, including the legendary Kimball House hotel, whose demolition in 1959 signaled the beginning of a wave of demolitions that destroyed many of the city's most famous landmarks in the 1960s and 1970s. "Urban renewal" laid waste to hundreds of acres in the city, much of which would lie undeveloped as "white flight" and general disinvestment sapped the city's vitality and diminished its tax base. Freeway construction, too, which began in the late 1940s, brought three major highways through the heart of the city and destroyed hundreds of businesses and residences in the process...

As the city began to lose population and crime rates soared, Underground Atlanta struggled to survive in the mid-1970s, and when construction of the city's new heavy-rail transit system demolished some of downtown's most important buildings in 1975, Underground Atlanta withered away. By then, the city's major passenger depots had both been torn down as had most of its old hotels and theaters and many of its early skyscrapers. Parts of the landmark Equitable Building, designed by Burnham and Root in 1890, were salvaged and repurposed as outdoor sculpture, and the entire facade of the Paramount Theater, designed by Hentz, Reid, and Adler in 1922, was re-erected as part of a private residence in south Georgia. Otherwise, Atlanta's historic architecture was consigned to the landfills.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2009, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,046,774 times
Reputation: 4482
Quote:
Originally Posted by back2dc View Post
Ciao! But before you do leave, do remember that both Virginia and Richmond voted for Obama. Politically, culturally, geographically, Virginia is firmly a mid-Atlantic state, just like New Jersey, Maryland and Pennsylvania.
Memphis, Jackson, Little Rock, Birmingham, Montgomery, even Nashville also all voted for Obama. Voting for Obama doesn't mean liberal or progressive. All of those cities aren't filled with 18-24-year-olds either (quite the opposite). Many Southern cities have very high black populations making them trend Democratic even though they can be very socially conservative places.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2009, 11:27 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,331,660 times
Reputation: 2698
^But the difference is that Mississippi, Tennessee, and Alabama went solidly for McCain. For Virginia, it was a combination of the Black vote (which, as you stated, always trends Democratic) in Richmond and Hampton Roads and the more liberal NoVA. However, I'm not arguing that Virginia going blue in the last election makes it culturally or even politically mid-Atlantic; surely you cannot extrapolate one event into a trend.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top