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Old 03-09-2009, 10:36 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,745 posts, read 3,451,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
My own invention. If Illinois is the midwest, then Kentucy is a midwestern southern state. Also Tenn, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana. But we're talking about Kentucky here.
Are you kidding me? Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana have ZERO Midwestern influence. They are all truly Southern states. Kentucky has some Midwestern influence, but it is pretty obvious that it is culturally, politically, and demographically an overall Southern state. The Ohio River is a very accurate cultural dividing line.
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Old 03-09-2009, 10:42 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,745 posts, read 3,451,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Anything south of I-70 and north of the Tennessee/Kentucky line from Wheeling to Kansas City.
....ummm, what? First off, Interstate 70 is not the best dividing line out there. True Southern culture doesn't even begin to take hold until you are almost 150 miles to the south of it. Cincinnati, Dayton, and St. Louis are all Midwestern cities. Some Southern influence, nowhere near enough to be called "Midwestern south." I prefer to just call it a transition zone. I use south of Highway 50 and North of Highway 60 as the borderlines for the region. The Northern half of Kentucky (north of Louisville and Lexington) is a transition zone. Louisville and Lexington are truly Southern cities. Paducah, Kentucky is without a doubt a Southern city, there is no way it is Midwestern in ANY shape or form. The Ohio River and Highway 60 are the approximate southern boundaries for the transition zone. Highway 50 is approximately the northern boundary. Everyone has an opinion, I know, but I know the area between Highway 50 and Highway 60 very well, and have headed south of the area many times. I can tell you that influence gets stronger as you head towards highway 60, weaker as you get toward highway 50.
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Old 03-09-2009, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
2,799 posts, read 5,444,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
There's a City of Richmond in Kentucky....there's a Kentucky Fried Chicken in Richmond. Spooky.
Popeyes, Bojangles, and Church's are all better than KFC (and I think all 3 places are located in the Richmond area - the one in the Mid-Atlantic state; I know the first and last are).

Mmm, chicken...
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Old 03-10-2009, 01:05 AM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,117 posts, read 2,495,300 times
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I assume because Kentucky is not on the Atlantic and Virginia is.

I am not going through 11 pages so let's just assume someone already said that and I am being redundant. It still needed to be said.

And yaaa Penn is sometimes called mid-atlantic but at least it's close. Kentucky? not so much.
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Old 03-10-2009, 01:50 AM
 
7,852 posts, read 12,749,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHIP72 View Post
Popeyes, Bojangles, and Church's are all better than KFC (and I think all 3 places are located in the Richmond area - the one in the Mid-Atlantic state; I know the first and last are).

Mmm, chicken...
And Mrs. Winner's brings up the rear...

I like Chick-fil-a the best, but it's really a different kind of place from on-the-bone chicken houses. Mmmm, chicken good...
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Old 03-10-2009, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,753 posts, read 14,901,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHIP72 View Post
Popeyes, Bojangles, and Church's are all better than KFC (and I think all 3 places are located in the Richmond area - the one in the Mid-Atlantic state; I know the first and last are).

Mmm, chicken...
Mmmmmmmmmm I LOVE Popeye's and sure do miss Bojangles Lee's Famous recipe and Indie's is great too (I don't know how big of a chain they are though)
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Old 03-10-2009, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
And Mrs. Winner's brings up the rear...

I like Chick-fil-a the best, but it's really a different kind of place from on-the-bone chicken houses. Mmmm, chicken good...
Am I the only perosn that loves the carrot raisin salad? My grandma used to make it and theirs is just as good
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Old 03-10-2009, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Chicago
36,637 posts, read 57,980,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
....ummm, what? First off, Interstate 70 is not the best dividing line out there. True Southern culture doesn't even begin to take hold until you are almost 150 miles to the south of it. Cincinnati, Dayton, and St. Louis are all Midwestern cities. Some Southern influence, nowhere near enough to be called "Midwestern south." I prefer to just call it a transition zone. I use south of Highway 50 and North of Highway 60 as the borderlines for the region. The Northern half of Kentucky (north of Louisville and Lexington) is a transition zone. Louisville and Lexington are truly Southern cities. Paducah, Kentucky is without a doubt a Southern city, there is no way it is Midwestern in ANY shape or form. The Ohio River and Highway 60 are the approximate southern boundaries for the transition zone. Highway 50 is approximately the northern boundary. Everyone has an opinion, I know, but I know the area between Highway 50 and Highway 60 very well, and have headed south of the area many times. I can tell you that influence gets stronger as you head towards highway 60, weaker as you get toward highway 50.
Uhm... right. It's a transition zone, from Midwest to South. Hence Midwestern South.

As for "true" southern culture not taking root until well south of I-70... I'm here to tell you that the people in Effingham IL have more in common with the people of West Memphis AR than of Plover WI.
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Old 03-10-2009, 07:25 AM
 
Location: 46201
6,861 posts, read 8,006,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Uhm... right. It's a transition zone, from Midwest to South. Hence Midwestern South.

As for "true" southern culture not taking root until well south of I-70... I'm here to tell you that the people in Effingham IL have more in common with the people of West Memphis AR than of Plover WI.
When I was in college in Evansville, IN; I used to joke with the locals that Indiana should give everything south of Bloomington and west of I-65 to Kentucky; and in exchange, Indiana should annex Louisville. I also used to say Evansville was the third biggest city in Kentucky.

They never saw the humor it it.
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Old 03-10-2009, 10:31 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,745 posts, read 3,451,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Uhm... right. It's a transition zone, from Midwest to South. Hence Midwestern South.

As for "true" southern culture not taking root until well south of I-70... I'm here to tell you that the people in Effingham IL have more in common with the people of West Memphis AR than of Plover WI.
Wrong, wrong, wrong. You have to be joking. West Memphis, Arkansas? Effingham, Illinois is not even remotely similar to it. It is far more resemblant to Wisconsin. If there is Southern culture there, I haven't noticed it. Effingham is almost in Central Illinois, for crying out loud. It has far more in common with St. Louis and Indianapolis than with any Southern city. People from there have a Midwestern accent, there is no Southern culture that I've noticed. How you could call that not the Midwest is beyond me. Effingham is NOTHING like West Memphis, Arkansas. NOTHING like it.
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