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Old 03-24-2007, 03:24 PM
 
500 posts, read 2,704,135 times
Reputation: 326

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I couldn't agree more with you, bmurphy.

I didn't know how bonkers America was going until I joined City Data Forum!

So many people moving from the place they love to places they don't know anything about just because they heard it's cheap down there (it's usually down)!

I'd rather live under a bridge in New York City than in Tennessee, and no offense to those who love TN. To me "quality" (Manhattan) matters much more than "affordability" (Tennessee).

But if you do move from NY to TN, don't come here complaining about the South and the rednecks and the Bible. Yeah, I don't like them either, but that's the way they are down there. Didn't you know??

So accommodate yourself to them and enjoy your cheap land or come back to New York.
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Old 03-24-2007, 03:25 PM
 
Location: In exile, plotting my coup
2,408 posts, read 13,368,706 times
Reputation: 1792
In relation to this, I find myself puzzled when people flee from places like New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts, usually more liberal-minded people who have lived most of their lives in (sub)urban areas of the nation's largest cities, and try to get the most bang for their buck by settling in small towns scattered throughout the South in places like Georgia and North Carolina. Then these very same people a few years down the line complain about the lack of things to do, the slow service, the distance from the grocery store, the influence of the church, etc. and I just wonder "well what did you expect?" They didn't even move to a remotely similar location, maybe an urban area like Atlanta or Charlotte, or a college town like Chapel Hill. It's almost as if they picked some random small town on the map and thought that it would be just like where they left, but with warmer weather and cheap housing. I'm not saying they don't have a right to complain, and I don't mean to single out these people in particular, but it's just more the fact that I don't see why some people are so surprised when they encounter certain issues in a new community even though it should be just common sense (i.e. surprised that it gets really cold in Minnesota, surprised that the dirt cheap taxes often mean poor-performing schools, surprised that there's no gourmet grocery store in a rural Arkansas town, surprised that so few people go to church in Seattle, etc.). It just seems like a lot of people don't do that much research before they move.
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Old 03-24-2007, 03:37 PM
 
Location: PA
669 posts, read 2,946,686 times
Reputation: 278
EXACTLY!

I'm glad so many of you agree with me. I'm sick of hearing it. Stay where you are and make it work, or move to a similar place, but don't move to something radically different and expect the same.
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Old 03-24-2007, 03:42 PM
 
3,020 posts, read 23,642,251 times
Reputation: 2704
Quote:
Originally Posted by dullnboring View Post
In relation to this, I find myself puzzled when people flee from places like New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts, usually more liberal-minded people who have lived most of their lives in (sub)urban areas of the nation's largest cities, and try to get the most bang for their buck by settling in small towns scattered throughout the South in places like Georgia and North Carolina.
The worse thing is they still want to vote for Ted Kennedy, Barney Frank, Hillary and all of that fun crowd. Probably what ruined Florida.
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Old 03-24-2007, 03:55 PM
 
Location: PA
669 posts, read 2,946,686 times
Reputation: 278
And once they ruin TN in the sense that it becomes bland and expensive like other places, they'll find the next rural state--which obviously will become harder and harder to find--and turn it into the same thing.

I would not be surprised if TN, NC, etc become pretty darn expensive soon.
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Old 03-24-2007, 04:53 PM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,997,093 times
Reputation: 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmurphy View Post
But NAH, that would be proving my point.

You're leaving to find cheaper living. Nothing wrong with that but if money were no object you never would have chosen Oil City.

If I won the lottery, I wouldnt stay in FL, id be looking somewhere in northern CA or even OR. Very beautiful land and weather Oil City is beautiful too but theres better locations for rich people
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Old 03-24-2007, 04:59 PM
 
Location: PA
669 posts, read 2,946,686 times
Reputation: 278
I'm not sure "rich people" live in California or Oregon. I mean yes, there are rich people, but there are people who aren't rich who live there.

It's called renting. Why does ONE PERSON need a house? Waste of resources if you ask me.
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Old 03-24-2007, 05:15 PM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 34,087,404 times
Reputation: 15063
What everyone is saying is totally understandable, BUT some people are in the situation where they feel they HAVE to leave the state they live in and really don't want to move. There are several states that have beautiful weather, but are very unaffordable for a lot of people.

BMurphy, I know that you're very young and you do have some posts that make it hard to believe that you're still a teen. But there are a lot of things you haven't experienced yet since you probably are still living at home. Any one of us who has been through a few years of struggling know exactly what I'm referring to. Of course, in many situations it's not the fault of the state they're living in, but can be caused by medical bills, young families just starting out, unexpected tragedies, etc. Yet consider how high even the rent is in some areas of Florida or southern California, or Massachusettes. The wages in some areas are just not comparable to the cost of houses, insurances, taxes, etc.

I am with you on your last point~I'm fine with renting an apartment just to be able to live in the Florida sunshine. Besides, we've had our house and been through the mortgage, taxes, insurance, fix this and fix that thing and a nice little apartment or condo in Fla. sounds very good to us.
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Old 03-24-2007, 10:38 PM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,997,093 times
Reputation: 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmurphy View Post
I'm not sure "rich people" live in California or Oregon. I mean yes, there are rich people, but there are people who aren't rich who live there.

It's called renting. Why does ONE PERSON need a house? Waste of resources if you ask me.

You cant really enjoy life in an expensive place if you arent rich. There would be no point to me moving to CA if I had to rent a tiny apartment with no room for my goldfish and collections and be living paycheck to paycheck. Also I want a house because it suits my lifestyle. I would need like $300k to get a nice house in north CA. Would need to be a millionire before I consider moving to CA.
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Old 03-24-2007, 10:45 PM
 
Location: PA
669 posts, read 2,946,686 times
Reputation: 278
Your goldfish need a grand ballroom or something?

I don't quite get why a stuffed animal collection, candle collection, coin collection and goldfish warrant buying a house.

"you can't enjoy life in an expensive state if you aren't rich" is almost the most ludicrous thing I've read. Actually, technically if you have even a minimum wage job, you CAN live anywhere. It's just the matter of giving up things. A min. wage worker might live fine in small town Iowa but have to give up shopping in California. It all depends on how much you can give up. In Cali you may not have a car, you may not have meals out, etc, but you could probably still survive.
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