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Old 03-28-2007, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Monterey Bay, California -- watching the sea lions, whales and otters! :D
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Quote:
I grew up like every other kid, but around age 8, my peers started adopting this stange Toronto/southern Ontario(?) culture. I was repeatedly made fun of for attempting conversations with someone I didn't know or if I was saying something to a group of acquaintances (so-called friends) I'd often get "Who are you talking to?"

Seriously, asking someone for directions or the time is like the only time you can usually get permission to speak with a stranger.
Maybe it's time to look for other friends and groups. I'm from Buffalo and I know lots of Canadians, so I'm not sure what you're referring to, but the people I know are quite open. Yes, Canada does seem more "polite" in ways, however, as close to the States as you are, I'm surprised you don't have more friends who are more open. If the people you know look at you strangely for starting conversations, just tell 'em you're from the States!

Seriously, I'm not sure what's going on. Maybe you're in a smaller town -- doesn't sound like you're in Toronto. Hamilton, maybe? I don't know how old you are, but maybe it's time for a move to a more urban area.

Everytime I've been up to Toronto, I have never encountered what you're expressing. I'm sure you're well aware that Buffalonians spend a lot of time in Canada, and the thing that strikes me most about Canada is it is CLEANER! Go across the border, and it's night and day. There was a time before Buffalo's economy bottomed out that the place to go was Buffalo, now it's in the reverse -- people from Buffalo go to Toronto.

I have a feeling there's more to this than what you're saying. There are lots of creative types in the Toronto area, lots of theater, music, events....if you feel the way you do, then it's time for trying new things.

Having spent tons of time in Toronto and other areas around there, I am well aware that there are other people than what you describe. Make a change and find those more outgoing types. Good luck!
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Old 03-28-2007, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elfyum View Post
Strange - I was just pondering this idea too...I work with some Canadians (Canadian based company) and I was wondering how they can be so laid back/mellow if it's so freakin cold up there!
I remember that you used to live in NYC...
If you've never been many places in the North, that could easily explain why we seemed so surprisingly mellow.

Wait... Do you mean the Canadians you talked to seemed generally more mellow than your fellow south Floridians?
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Old 03-28-2007, 10:04 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,628 posts, read 13,885,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
I remember that you used to live in NYC...
If you've never been many places in the North, that could easily explain why we seemed so surprisingly mellow.

Wait... Do you mean the Canadians you talked to seemed generally more mellow than your fellow south Floridians?
Hell , South Florida is full of Canadians, and , when they are there , they are just trying to thaw out !..........".don't bother me when I am about to run into the surf in February" !!......burrrrr.........feels great EH ?
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Old 03-28-2007, 08:13 PM
 
Location: FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
I remember that you used to live in NYC...
If you've never been many places in the North, that could easily explain why we seemed so surprisingly mellow.

Wait... Do you mean the Canadians you talked to seemed generally more mellow than your fellow south Floridians?
Joking you are, no? Cause SOFL AIN"T mellow!!! (Well, yeah, there are alot of people on "island time", but that's a different dimension mahn.)
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Old 03-28-2007, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
Maybe it's time to look for other friends and groups. I'm from Buffalo and I know lots of Canadians, so I'm not sure what you're referring to, but the people I know are quite open.

Yes, Canada does seem more "polite" in ways, however, as close to the States as you are, I'm surprised you don't have more friends who are more open. If the people you know look at you strangely for starting conversations, just tell 'em you're from the States!

Seriously, I'm not sure what's going on. Maybe you're in a smaller town -- doesn't sound like you're in Toronto. Hamilton, maybe? I don't know how old you are, but maybe it's time for a move to a more urban area.
Sorry I didn't reply before, I didn't realize you were quoting me until I read the post.

What I'm referring to is mostly how people relate to strangers, people they've never met before.

What do you mean by "polite?"

People here are generally too quiet (too few on words, not volume level) and have too many reservations about greeting or introducing themselves to strangers. To me it just does not seem right if you aren't busy, you notice someone else who has nothing going on and using body language to pretend they aren't there. That's the norm, and I hate it.

On vacation I've been in many parts of the southern U.S. and have noticed many "loud"/bold personalities (often residents of smaller cities, towns or sometimes rural areas) that seem practically fearless of strangers. They tend to be pretty welcoming and more interesting to be around. I feel more at home in places like this.

I live in Mississauga, population 600,000 and one city west of Toronto. I wouldn't be surpised if the people in the nearby Niagara area are friendlier (not afraid of strangers) than the Toronto area. My parents have told me that in nearby parts of the U.S. people seem a little friendlier than here.
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Old 03-28-2007, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Monterey Bay, California -- watching the sea lions, whales and otters! :D
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Quote:
I live in Mississauga, population 600,000 and one city west of Toronto. I wouldn't be surpised if the people in the nearby Niagara area are friendlier (not afraid of strangers) than the Toronto area. My parents have told me that in nearby parts of the U.S. people seem a little friendlier than here.
To be quite honest, Ontario is more similar to New York State, and I'm not sure about the South for you in the U.S. It does sound like you may be younger, so at this point in life, you may be lucky to explore and discover places that feel "right" to you.

Mississauga is not far from the States, and if you find you want to be more expressive, maybe more travel in the States is in order. Eventually, you will find where you feel most comfortable.

From my experience, Canada is pretty liberal, and I'm not sure that the Southern States would be that good -- but then again, I know nothing about you.

Quote:
People here are generally too quiet (too few on words, not volume level) and have too many reservations about greeting or introducing themselves to strangers. To me it just does not seem right if you aren't busy, you notice someone else who has nothing going on and using body language to pretend they aren't there. That's the norm, and I hate it.
It sounds like you might enjoy traveling around and finding the place that feels "right" to you. As for "polite," you have described it: "too few on words, not volume level) and have too many reservations about greeting or introducing themselves to strangers."

Although it may be a generational thing, too, as I suspect I am much older than you, and my friends in Canada are pretty radical, creative, outgoing and are involved in a lot of political activities. They are also into theatre and music and all those pursuits that generally involve more creative types of people.

My suggestion is to travel a bit more, see if a place feels more like "home" to you, and then maybe you will want to relocate. Many Canadians come and settle in the States. I think that you will be welcomed wherever you feel comfortable.

Good luck to you -- I think you will find that place that fits you!
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Old 03-28-2007, 11:31 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
To be quite honest, Ontario is more similar to New York State, and I'm not sure about the South for you in the U.S. It does sound like you may be younger, so at this point in life, you may be lucky to explore and discover places that feel "right" to you.

Mississauga is not far from the States, and if you find you want to be more expressive, maybe more travel in the States is in order. Eventually, you will find where you feel most comfortable.

From my experience, Canada is pretty liberal, and I'm not sure that the Southern States would be that good -- but then again, I know nothing about you.
This is an interesting perspective.

Canada is pretty liberal, and that is "not a comfort" to me, generally speaking.

Ex: Why does liberal mean not permitting the sale of fireworks to the public except around certain holidays? Maybe I'm getting the terms confused but the only places I've seen fireworks for sale year-round are in "really redneck" states.

Quote:
It sounds like you might enjoy traveling around and finding the place that feels "right" to you. As for "polite," you have described it: "too few on words, not volume level) and have too many reservations about greeting or introducing themselves to strangers."

Although it may be a generational thing, too, as I suspect I am much older than you, and my friends in Canada are pretty radical, creative, outgoing and are involved in a lot of political activities. They are also into theatre and music and all those pursuits that generally involve more creative types of people.

My suggestion is to travel a bit more, see if a place feels more like "home" to you, and then maybe you will want to relocate. Many Canadians come and settle in the States. I think that you will be welcomed wherever you feel comfortable.

Good luck to you -- I think you will find that place that fits you!
I felt exceptionally comfortable in many parts of the Southern U.S.

But I don't go often because it's so far away, didn't move there because it's a different country, legal immigration is very difficult and I refuse to become an illegal immigrant.

I've also felt comfortable talking with people from Canada's East Coast.
(but it's colder there normally and that scares me)
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Old 03-29-2007, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Monterey Bay, California -- watching the sea lions, whales and otters! :D
1,918 posts, read 6,238,888 times
Reputation: 2636
Well, I think the Canadian government is a plus, however, if you feel uncomfortable there, then maybe you are correct, and a more conservative place like the South is where you might feel better. Sometimes we do end up in or are raised in places that just don't feel "right" to us. Fortunately, there are options.

[I don't really understand the fireworks reference, however, I think that on the many Indian reservations around, you can get them year-round.]

Eastern Canada is very beautiful -- I can't imagine it being much colder than the Toronto area. I've been up to Montreal and Quebec City, and it's not that much colder. (Of course, I'm from Buffalo, so we get the lake effects snow, and I guess maybe I'm more used to that rugged weather.)

I don't know how old you are, however, if you are of college age, maybe you would want to apply to an American college in the south -- that would give you a student visa, and if you found a job there, then you could be sponsored and possibly get dual citizenship -- just a thought.

At any rate, it sounds like you have some options, and you seem to know what makes you feel comfortable, now just get your courage up and take the leap -- it could be very freeing. Good luck to you.
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Old 03-29-2007, 12:15 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,628 posts, read 13,885,151 times
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Default North American Union

The push for opening the borders to all workers of NA could become reality sooner than one might think ! Bush , and the Neo-Cons want this to happen .Slowly below the radar, more progress is being made( if you can call it that) in creating a full North American Union. Its too bad that the public has no say in this historical exchange..........its all about big business, and , they always win ,...end the end !
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Old 03-29-2007, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 23,698,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
Well, I think the Canadian government is a plus, however, if you feel uncomfortable there, then maybe you are correct, and a more conservative place like the South is where you might feel better. Sometimes we do end up in or are raised in places that just don't feel "right" to us. Fortunately, there are options.
It's not terrible for me, but the majority of the new laws that pass annoy me somewhat. I appreciate our health system.

Quote:
Eastern Canada is very beautiful -- I can't imagine it being much colder than the Toronto area. I've been up to Montreal and Quebec City, and it's not that much colder.
There are many forms of cold; for most people it seems to conjure images of ice and snow.
For me, I'm including cold of the "goosebump variety," like a mid-summer's day below 65 F with a brisk wind. (shudder, lol)

Quote:
I don't know how old you are, however, if you are of college age, maybe you would want to apply to an American college in the south -- that would give you a student visa, and if you found a job there, then you could be sponsored and possibly get dual citizenship -- just a thought.

At any rate, it sounds like you have some options, and you seem to know what makes you feel comfortable, now just get your courage up and take the leap -- it could be very freeing. Good luck to you.
I couldn't afford to go to an American college when I was younger, now I don't feel financially comfortable going back to school at all, let alone an American one.

I appreciate the pep-talk.

BTW I responded to this thread just to point out a different view, that climate doesn't make northern people better in some respects, and that in some cases it can contribute to negative attitudes.

(not mine though, I hope I seem pleasant, even if I do sound perturbed )
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