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Old 03-23-2009, 04:04 PM
 
Location: From Ulster, now in England.
105 posts, read 180,686 times
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That have dominant British areas.

You see parts of New York that are Irish, Italian. even though they are 2nd or 3rd generation American.

did the British settlers ( English, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish) just simply assimilate into the General white American culture.

It seems Millions and millions of Americans are descended from British settlers, but within a generation they had Simply melted without leaving any cultural evidence behind.
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Old 03-23-2009, 04:21 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,257 posts, read 6,976,731 times
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Percentage of citizens claiming primary English ancestry:




Scots-Irish ancestry:




Scottish ancestry:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7c/Scottish1346.gif (broken link)


Welsh ancestry:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c5/Welsh1346.gif (broken link)


Granted, these maps are not 100% reliable for determining the ethnic makeup of particular regions. Given that the British were among the original European settlers in America, many Americans of British ancestry cannot trace their genealogy to Europe. And many Americans are, well, "mutts." The most obvious English influence is in New England, particularly in rural areas that have experienced less immigration, and in the mountainous west (e.g. Utah), which was largely settled prior to major immigration of other ethnic groups.

The Scots-Irish and Scottish immigration to the South of the US was particularly strong (i.e. in Appalachia), but many Southerners no longer identify with their British origins and simply consider themselves "American."

Still, it's a bit silly to say that the British settlers left no cultural evidence in the US. Not even taking into consideration things like cultural values, traditions, music, etc. -- they left their language, didn't they?
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Old 03-23-2009, 04:59 PM
 
Location: From Ulster, now in England.
105 posts, read 180,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post




Still, it's a bit silly to say that the British settlers left no cultural evidence in the US. Not even taking into consideration things like cultural values, traditions, music, etc. -- they left their language, didn't they?
Thanks for the reply.


Aye, they left their language.

But, unlike other immigrants it seems the british settlers just simply assimilated into American life.
You still see in America, generations of Irish, polish,Italian holding onto their heritage.

You still have German-American day, you have polish-American shops ,Greek-American shops.

What I'm trying to say is, you don't see or hear about an Scottish-American Neighbourhood Or an English-American neighbourhood of Philadelphia, New York, Etc, Etc.
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Old 03-23-2009, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,954 posts, read 4,508,873 times
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Most Ulster Scots (referred to as Scots-Irish in America) settled in rural areas in the Appalachian Mountain region. They did not settle in the urban cities of America at the time, so you will find no such traditional neighborhoods. I myself have Ulster heritage and know that my ancestors settled in rural Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

The English were more likely to settle in urban centers, but most people of that heritage have moved out of the city neighborhoods they originally settled many generations ago. Basically they were displaced by immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe. The English who stayed in cities just became typical Americans and did not embrace their heritage or create "little Britain" type communities.
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Old 03-23-2009, 08:07 PM
 
Location: East Millcreek
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Utah will be pretty high because most are very sure about their family history and many LDS emigrated from Britain in the 18th Century.
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Old 03-23-2009, 08:56 PM
 
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While many of the original settlers of N America were English, they didn't arrive in subsequent "waves" the way the Germans, Irish, Poles, Italians, etc. did, much later after the original settlement. I also wonder if many Brits who came this way after the Rev. War diverted themselves to Canada rather than come to the US to retain their English citizenship?
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Old 03-23-2009, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
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I wouldn't say people of British heritage have melted away. In fact it's probably the predominate basis of culture in most of the US and the one fundamental to assimilation for the most part.

A tad less pronounced than in Canada because of the additional amounts of immigrants here from Mainland Europe, and Eastern and Southern Europe in the last few generations, and now Hispanics and Asains in other parts of the country. We simply have let more people in from around the world.
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Old 03-23-2009, 11:47 PM
 
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Americans of British ancestry dominate the old-money high society, or the WASPs. They are somewhat connected to their roots with their English-sounding names. Many are Episcopalian.
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Old 03-24-2009, 07:12 AM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,236,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulster_Loyal View Post
That have dominant British areas.

You see parts of New York that are Irish, Italian. even though they are 2nd or 3rd generation American.

did the British settlers ( English, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish) just simply assimilate into the General white American culture.

It seems Millions and millions of Americans are descended from British settlers, but within a generation they had Simply melted without leaving any cultural evidence behind.
Good observation - a lot of the northeast (Boston to Baltimore) had waves of 19th and 20th century immigrants from Italy, Eastern Europe, and catholic Ireland. The southeast U.S. was different, besides African slaves, the mostly protestant British settlers saw a little bit of immigration from the protestant French (Huguenots), and protestant Germans.

I associate the ulster scots with the Appalachian Mountain range - parts of Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, West Virginia, Kentucky. Where I'm from in South Carolina, if you head toward the rural hills you get a lot of Scottish or Scots Irish families.. move toward the rural coast and the swamps and it is more African, French, German and English.

I have heard of communities out west, or in the Pacific Northwest, that have distinct ulster roots.

In these areas you will find Scottish festivals and such.

Quote:
But, unlike other immigrants it seems the british settlers just simply assimilated into American life.
You still see in America, generations of Irish, polish,Italian holding onto their heritage.

You still have German-American day, you have polish-American shops ,Greek-American shops.

What I'm trying to say is, you don't see or hear about an Scottish-American Neighbourhood Or an English-American neighbourhood of Philadelphia, New York, Etc, Etc.
Just a result of history, I guess.

The English, Scottish, etc. came to the U.S. east coast, got here early (1680) and began cutting down trees, creating farmland, pushing west, spreading out across the land. The people are still there, they just aren't typically in a neighborhood of an urban area.

100-200 years later, the northern cities saw influxes of Italians, Irish Catholics, Polish, Greeks, et cetera. They formed towns and neighborhoods across the northeast, which is why you still have those urban areas today.

Last edited by le roi; 03-24-2009 at 07:28 AM..
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Old 03-24-2009, 03:31 PM
 
Location: From Ulster, now in England.
105 posts, read 180,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubber_factory View Post
Good observation - a lot of the northeast (Boston to Baltimore) had waves of 19th and 20th century immigrants from Italy, Eastern Europe, and catholic Ireland. The southeast U.S. was different, besides African slaves, the mostly protestant British settlers saw a little bit of immigration from the protestant French (Huguenots), and protestant Germans.

I associate the ulster scots with the Appalachian Mountain range - parts of Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, West Virginia, Kentucky. Where I'm from in South Carolina, if you head toward the rural hills you get a lot of Scottish or Scots Irish families.. move toward the rural coast and the swamps and it is more African, French, German and English.

I have heard of communities out west, or in the Pacific Northwest, that have distinct ulster roots.

In these areas you will find Scottish festivals and such.



Just a result of history, I guess.

The English, Scottish, etc. came to the U.S. east coast, got here early (1680) and began cutting down trees, creating farmland, pushing west, spreading out across the land. The people are still there, they just aren't typically in a neighborhood of an urban area.

100-200 years later, the northern cities saw influxes of Italians, Irish Catholics, Polish, Greeks, et cetera. They formed towns and neighborhoods across the northeast, which is why you still have those urban areas today.
Thanks for a very good reply.

One thing that annoys me is the word SCOTCH-IRISH.

Yes i know this is only used in America, but as i have stated before it's incorrect.

As you can tell by my user name I'm a Ulsterman and a lot of people on my side of the community dont consider themselves to be Irish. if i moved to America I'd be a wee bit upset if someone said i was Scotch-Irish.
a lot of ulster protestants are a mixed bunch of Scottish,English, French Huguenot and German palatine decent. We are not just of Scottish Decent.

Once again, thanks for a good reply.
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