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Old 03-25-2009, 05:58 PM
j33
 
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Orwelleaut - I am well over 30 and recall first hearing rap when I was a child. While I'm not a fan of most of it (I do have a soft spot for early Beastie Boys and Public Enemy though) it is false to say that people over 30 "grew up before it existed".

Growing up in the 80's, rap, breakdancing, and that whole scene was hugely popular (of course I grew up just south of Chicago around a huge African American population so I'm sure that had something to do with it), so it isn't as if this style of music just appeared in the past few years, it has been around since the late 70's early 80's (e.g. Afrika Bambaataa, etc), and I've been aware of it since I was a pretty young kid.

 
Old 03-25-2009, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orwelleaut View Post
1993-1996?? Dominated?? Maybe in some areas, but certainly not in the white youth culture back then. There was some gangster rap back then, but the average white college student had no use for it. The average white college student, back then, was into Alternative. Alternative was our Generation X soundtrack, and it all began with Nirvana in 1992. In 1993, Pearl Jam was huge, and it all went from there. The rest of the 90's were the era of Stone Temple Pilots,The Smashing Pumpkins, The Offspring, Candlebox, and all of the Alternative bands. Right up until at least 2000 or so, twentysomethings and Alternative went hand in hand. There was that question that we all asked each other: "Do you listen to Alternative?" The answer was always yes, unless you wanted to be seen as totally uncool. We were the slacker generation, according to the media, because we were into Grunge and Alternative.
I'm not talking about music in general. I'm talking about hip hop. When it comes to hip hop, the west coast dominated from 1993-1996 but the East Coast was still heard from with having a multitude of classic albums and singles.



Quote:
When Generation X is referred to as the "hip-hop generation", that must be a reference to black X'ers having acquired a taste for rap and hip-hop over the soul and R&B enjoyed by older black people. The generation where there seems to be a widespread taste for rap is Generation Y, so I would think that they would be called the "Hip-hop Generation". White college students are very into rap these days, but that is a recent thing, and a real cultural shift from the 90's. White Generation X is more the "Pearl Jam Generation".
Not just the "black" X-ers. But the Hispanic X'ers as well. Because Hispanics also had a hand in at the beginning of hip hop. For one, I don't like the term Generation X or Y. Too broad of a definition. Most people that are in their 40s and 50s now was jamming in the clubs in the 80s to the Sugar Hill Gang, Whodini, Grandmaster Flash, Run DMC, etc when they was in their 20s and 30s. They enjoyed that as much as they enjoyed R&B and Soul music from the 1960s and 1970s. The hip hop generation is people born between 1964-1983. I think you know little about the genre and what it has to offer. It's more in your face than the other genre's and much more urban than the other genre's.

BTW, hip hop IS music.
 
Old 03-25-2009, 06:19 PM
 
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Thumbs down white Generation Y punks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nauticadon View Post
Best places to avoid rap music? Is that the new PC way to asking how to avoid minorities or anyone associated with the hip hop lifestyle?
Definitely not. Avoidance of those associated with the hip-hop lifestyle who think the rest of world likes their bass beat. This is more associated with demographics than race, with being a teen or twentysomething these days. I know many older black people in my area who like rap and hip-hop even less than myself. They listen to what is, IMHO, some pretty good stuff, like classic blues guitar, motown, classic soul and R&B, and smooth jazz. Older black people know what real music is.

White Generation Y punks with their Eminem crap are the biggest problem. They want everyone else to hear their crap from three miles away, like a wasted King Kong stumbling around doing bong hits, LOL!!!!
 
Old 03-25-2009, 06:25 PM
 
908 posts, read 1,815,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orwelleaut View Post
White Generation Y punks with their Eminem crap are the biggest problem. They want everyone else to hear their crap from three miles away, like a wasted King Kong stumbling around doing bong hits, LOL!!!!
Black Generation Y punks do it too. It's not a race thing. But I think American Idol strangely has put some brakes to the rap fad. You hear less rap nowadays on the Top 40 radio stations than 5-8 years ago. A lot more pop rock now.
 
Old 03-25-2009, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Jersey
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Hip-Hop/Rap/whatever you want to call it is dead and on its way out.
 
Old 03-25-2009, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerJAX View Post
Hip-Hop/Rap/whatever you want to call it is dead and on its way out.
Hip Hop is not dead. It is still alive. It is dead in the mainstream and frankly, most hip hop heads are glad that it is. It still lives in the underground and it has too large of a fanbase amongst minorities for it ever to be dead. If people don't know anything about hip hop, they should not speak on it.
 
Old 03-25-2009, 08:04 PM
 
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Grandmaster Flash and Run DMC I remember from my teen years. Some of this stuff was pretty cool. M.C. Hammer was big when I was a college freshman. I thought his stuff was a little cheesy, but kind of fun. Who could forget "Can't Touch This?" I also liked that human beat box thing in high school a little.

I never really got into The Beastie Boys in college, but I also never felt strongly about them either. I thought they were kind of stupid, but didn't give them much thought. A few of my peers were into them as I remember, but I don't remember them having that obnoxious bass beat. If you had Whitesnake or Aerosmith turned up, you didn't know if the neighbor had The Beastie Boys on or not.

The point at which I began to really dislike rap was when the gangster rap came out. That was where the pounding beat started. This was the stuff that was absoluely detested by white college students in the nineties, and for good reason. It was angry and violent, no fun, just some guy bragging about his guns, drug money, and prostitutes he would sleep with.

If Generation Y must be so into rap, why can't they at least listen to the earlier stuff that wasn't about shootings and degrading women, or the current stuff that is not? I suppose the bad apples are spoiling the juice, so to speak, as they are the ones who blast their radios. I know what gangster rap sounds like, because I remember seeing Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, and Snoop Dogg on MTV in the mid-nineties. These three picked up where 2-Live-Crew left off with the trashy stuff, and made rap into pure sleaze.
 
Old 03-25-2009, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,954 posts, read 4,505,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orwelleaut View Post
If Generation Y must be so into rap, why can't they at least listen to the earlier stuff that wasn't about shootings and degrading women, or the current stuff that is not? I suppose the bad apples are spoiling the juice, so to speak, as they are the ones who blast their radios. I know what gangster rap sounds like, because I remember seeing Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, and Snoop Dogg on MTV in the mid-nineties. These three picked up where 2-Live-Crew left off with the trashy stuff, and made rap into pure sleaze.
I think your comments on music trends over the years have been pretty accurate, but I think there has been a resurgence of rock music among people in there 20's the last few years. A lot younger folks these days are into being hipsters and listening to indie rock along with resurrecting some older bands.
 
Old 03-25-2009, 08:44 PM
 
Location: St Louis County, MO
711 posts, read 1,869,804 times
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I feel dumber having read this post.
 
Old 03-25-2009, 08:55 PM
 
421 posts, read 1,404,983 times
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I've noticed that too. There are some early twentysomethings around here who are into eighties metal, and are really nice kids. We're talking bands like Poison, Skid Row, and Dokken. They seem to see these bands the way I see stuff like Bad Company and Queen: cool, classic music, but not Mom and Dad's music.
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