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Old 03-24-2009, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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I'm going to say the Midwest begins around the border of PA and Ohio, with Youngstown and Cleveland being Midwestern transition cities. Apparently there is legitimate evidence to put Pittsburgh, not only structurally, architecturally and demographically in the Northeast, but also culturally...

http://faculty.smu.edu/RKEMPER/anth_...al_Regions.jpg
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Old 03-24-2009, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Chicago, Illinois
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i would say somewhere in ohio. PA is nothing close to Midwest.
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Old 03-24-2009, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
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There is no "line": there is a great shaded region that stretches from Indiana to central Pennsylvania where you get more northeastern as you go east and more midwestern as you pass west. This would put Cleveland and such right in the middle, making it 50/50. Pittsburgh would be about 80% eastern.
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Old 03-24-2009, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I think it starts as you get into the mountains around the PA border. When you go from more manufacturing to coal mining.
You are aware that Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, which is only two hours from New York City, was traditionally Pennsylvania's largest hot bed of anthracite coal mining in its heyday, right? We are decidedly Northeastern. I believe State College, PA may actually be the true "dividing line" here. Anything west of there and people say Midwestern terms (i.e. "pop" instead of soda). Anything east of there and you feel Northeastern.
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Old 03-24-2009, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScranBarre View Post
You are aware that Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, which is only two hours from New York City, was traditionally Pennsylvania's largest hot bed of anthracite coal mining in its heyday, right? We are decidedly Northeastern. I believe State College, PA may actually be the true "dividing line" here. Anything west of there and people say Midwestern terms (i.e. "pop" instead of soda). Anything east of there and you feel Northeastern.
I think he ment the western border of PA, not the eastern.
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Old 03-24-2009, 02:55 PM
 
893 posts, read 444,906 times
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Ohio and Pennsylvania is the line.
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Old 03-24-2009, 06:44 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I'd agree. When traveling west to east on I-80, the landscape changes almost immediately when you cross the border into PA. You know you're not in Kansas any more!
The road gets worse, too, as you cross into PA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsmith View Post
There is no "line": there is a great shaded region that stretches from Indiana to central Pennsylvania where you get more northeastern as you go east and more midwestern as you pass west. This would put Cleveland and such right in the middle, making it 50/50. Pittsburgh would be about 80% eastern.
There is a huge difference between western Indiana and central Pennsylvania.
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Old 03-24-2009, 10:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5Lakes View Post
Well according to the government the border is at the Ohio/PA line. I'm originally from that region and can tell you things get more noticeably "midwestern" once you get west of Cleveland. I feel eastern Ohio/western PA/western NY is kind of the transition zone between the midwest and east coast.

I think West Virginia might be up for debate, as it's hard to classify.
I agree, 5Lakes. Our little section here is definitely a transition area between Northeast and Midwest. The best description of this neck of the woods I've heard is "Midwest Appalachian". I think one passes into Midwest Appalachian from the East starting at around Clearfield and Altoona in PA, and a little farther East up in NY. Elmira feels pretty Midwest Appalachian and is pop territory, so somewhere around Elmira/Corning and West up there. For WV, Wheeling is totally Midwest Appalachian. Parkersburg is more Midwest meets South, like Cincy.
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Old 03-25-2009, 02:51 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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There is no way Darlington, PA in the way western part of the state is the midwest, let alone Altoona.
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Old 03-25-2009, 05:29 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,902,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I would say the line passes through Toledo and Columbus. Anywhere south of that, there is no line because it's all The South.

Lima OH is definitely a Midwestern town, Sandusky and Youngstown are clearly Northeastern, and Chilicothe is the mid-south, like Kentucky.
Are you kidding me? Southern Ohio for the most part is Midwestern. Cincinnati, Dayton, and most of Southern Ohio are for the most part Midwestern. The true South doesn't begin until you cross the Ohio River into either West Virginia or Kentucky. Most of Ohio I would say is in the Midwest. The Northeast I would say starts near the Ohio/Pennsylvania border and east of Cleveland. You are putting at least 50% of Ohio in the South, and that is far from the truth. Ohio is a Midwestern state. Period.
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