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Old 03-24-2009, 09:45 AM
 
Location: The Woods
16,967 posts, read 22,285,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I heard there is some confusion about the word Dutch. It may refer to the Netherlands, but also to Deutsch, i.e. German. The Amish for instance speak Dutch, if I am not mistaken. Do you have a 'van' in your last name? Then it would refer to the Netherlands. I have been there only once and I have not seen a single half-timbered house there, only those mud-clad and red-brick houses. But maybe I just went to the wrong places
The so-called "Pennsylvania Dutch" are/were actually Germans; came from mispronouncing Deutsch as Dutch.
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Old 03-24-2009, 11:17 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,060,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I heard there is some confusion about the word Dutch. It may refer to the Netherlands, but also to Deutsch, i.e. German. The Amish for instance speak Dutch, if I am not mistaken. Do you have a 'van' in your last name? Then it would refer to the Netherlands. I have been there only once and I have not seen a single half-timbered house there, only those mud-clad and red-brick houses. But maybe I just went to the wrong places
My mother's family lived in a neighborhood in upstate NY called "Dutchtown", so nicknamed because of the confusion between "Deutsch" and "Dutch". Today the neighborhood is mostly black and Puerto Rican, but it's still called Dutchtown. Seeveral years ago when riding through I noticed a church called "La Iglesia de Dutchtown".

I've heard many people of German ancestry had no problem with being called or calling themselves "Dutch" around the time of WWI. At that time there was a lot of anti-German predjudice and lots of German immigrants tried to keep a low profile to avoid being the targets of "patriots".
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Old 03-24-2009, 11:24 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,480 posts, read 19,337,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
My mother's family lived in a neighborhood in upstate NY called "Dutchtown", so nicknamed because of the confusion between "Deutsch" and "Dutch". Today the neighborhood is mostly black and Puerto Rican, but it's still called Dutchtown. Seeveral years ago when riding through I noticed a church called "La Iglesia de Dutchtown".

I've heard many people of German ancestry had no problem with being called or calling themselves "Dutch" around the time of WWI. At that time there was a lot of anti-German predjudice and lots of German immigrants tried to keep a low profile to avoid being the targets of "patriots".
La iglesia de Dutchtown
Actually, near the border between Germany and the Netherlands people are pretty much the same on both sides, the local dialect spoken on the German side is difficult to understand for the rest of Germans, it is similar to Dutch. That tendency goes for many dialects of Northern Germany, too. So, if people from those German regions want to talk to other Germans for instance from the south, they have to speak Standard German if they want to be understood.
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Old 03-24-2009, 11:29 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,060,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I heard there is some confusion about the word Dutch. It may refer to the Netherlands, but also to Deutsch, i.e. German. The Amish for instance speak Dutch, if I am not mistaken. Do you have a 'van' in your last name? Then it would refer to the Netherlands. I have been there only once and I have not seen a single half-timbered house there, only those mud-clad and red-brick houses. But maybe I just went to the wrong places
Check out Milwaukee to see half-timbered houses and buildings. I believe they call that style "fasching".
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Old 03-24-2009, 11:31 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,060,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
La iglesia de Dutchtown
Actually, near the border between Germany and the Netherlands people are pretty much the same on both sides, the local dialect spoken on the German side is difficult to understand for the rest of Germans, it is similar to Dutch. That tendency goes for many dialects of Northern Germany, too. So, if people from those German regions want to talk to other Germans for instance from the south, they have to speak Standard German if they want to be understood.
Interesting. Many of my ancestors came from Alsace (Elsas), and were bi-lingual (French - German).
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Old 03-24-2009, 11:33 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,480 posts, read 19,337,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Check out Milwaukee to see half-timbered houses and buildings. I believe they call that style "fasching".
That would be a funny way to call it. Fasching is the south German word for Carnival, might indicate that those Germans came from the south.

Last edited by Neuling; 03-24-2009 at 11:43 AM..
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Old 03-24-2009, 11:35 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,480 posts, read 19,337,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Interesting. Many of my ancestors came from Alsace (Elsas), and were bi-lingual (French - German).
Oh yes, that is a region which France and Germany have fought over quite bitterly for centuries.
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Old 03-24-2009, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,517,455 times
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I'm not sure what German's DeaconJ has been around, but all the German's I have encountered have been very friendly and nice. One friend was a foreign exchange student at college whom I played football with. He was from Munich, and although at times he seemed a little rigid, he was very friendly and nice. Never condescending.

I'm also good friends with two German girls (one from Hannover, the other from Minden) who are nannying in my town and they are both very outgoing and friendly. I suppose it all depends on who you meet though.

Overall I don't think a town is any "nicer" because of German influence. There are many beautiful New England towns which are heavily influenced by Irish/English populations. The same goes for New York and New Jersey.

It's extremely annoying and pompous to read some of the earlier "Yes, cities with German stock are definitely better", most notably the one speaking about the German race being superior.
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Old 03-24-2009, 03:40 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,282,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmac9wr View Post
I'm not sure what German's DeaconJ has been around, but all the German's I have encountered have been very friendly and nice. One friend was a foreign exchange student at college whom I played football with. He was from Munich, and although at times he seemed a little rigid, he was very friendly and nice. Never condescending.

I'm also good friends with two German girls (one from Hannover, the other from Minden) who are nannying in my town and they are both very outgoing and friendly. I suppose it all depends on who you meet though.

Overall I don't think a town is any "nicer" because of German influence. There are many beautiful New England towns which are heavily influenced by Irish/English populations. The same goes for New York and New Jersey.

It's extremely annoying and pompous to read some of the earlier "Yes, cities with German stock are definitely better", most notably the one speaking about the German race being superior.
I've been around MANY arrogant Germans throughout my lifetime, and never have I met one that was appealing in any way. On the other hand, every Canadian I have ever encountered has been totally pleasant, as have Brits, Australians, Dutch, Japanese, Koreans, Vietnamese, and so on. There is often a language barrier, and if that's the only excuse our local German expert in this thread can come up with...then I wonder why it isn't a problem with any other nationality...
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Old 03-24-2009, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,517,455 times
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That's funny because most Canadians I've ever met have had the "superiority complex" you've found with Germans, and it really pissed me off (it appears to have done the same with you and Germans).

I guess it's just the luck of the draw in the long run. Perhaps I'm just fortunate and you've been unlucky.
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