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Old 06-25-2007, 01:33 PM
 
8,376 posts, read 27,775,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Actually, parts of the South were settled by large numbers of Germans, notably Fredericksburg TX (San Antonio area), Louisville, Houston, and Mecklinburg County, NC (Charlotte). New Orleans had large numbers of Germans in the city in the early 20th Century. tru about FL--all the Germans there now came from somewhere else in the past 50 years.

Also, someone mentioned not many Germans in the NE--Check out Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Rochester, and large numbers settled in NYC (but didn't dominate, as so many various groups settled there.) There were old German neighborhoods in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Bronx.
Most of the Northeast was dominated by Italian and Irish descent, but I am aware that many germans live there, as well as EVERYWHERE in the United States.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gardener34 View Post
I read once that more caucasian americans can claim german as part of their ancestry more than any other country of origin. I forget the percentage.


So I am saying that by odds that would be a yes?
18 percent.
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Old 06-25-2007, 04:08 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I agree on the UK, not on France. The only parts of the South with signifacnt French ancestry are Louisana and adjacent Gulf coastal areas in MS and TX (i.e., the Cajuns who came from Nova Scotia), and the Charleston SC area (Hueguenot settlement). Areas in the US with the most French ancestry would be New England, with smaller numbers in the Upper Midwest. (Even some in Western NY. Some of my ancestors emmigrated there from Alsace, currently a French province that has switched back and forth to Germany in the past several centuries.)
I stand corrected about French ancestry then.
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Old 06-25-2007, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,280,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post
My German wife keeps me in line; 'cause if I misbehave, she does the "Blitzkreig" on me!
Eat your beans and coleslaw!
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Old 06-26-2007, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Panama City Beach, Florida
118 posts, read 422,454 times
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I can also attest to the fact that the Germans, in general, like to keep things in "Ordnung" and believe that there are correct ways to act and do things and ways that you shouldn't act or do things.
My wife was born and raised in Germany. If I step out of line, "Mein Frau will auch eine Blitzkrieg an Mich haben., just as her Mother did to her Father.

We live in Panama City Beach, FL and have grown tired of the beach, the springbreakers and hurricanes. We would love to find a nice city in the USA that has a strong German influence and culture.
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Old 06-26-2007, 12:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HBJohn View Post
Sorry, I have to disagree, cities dominated by people from German stock are better. It's pretty much a known fact.
In Cincinnati Germans make up the largest ancestry, But it's still declining (one of the most declining)!
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Old 06-26-2007, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Alabama!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Criss1956 View Post
I can also attest to the fact that the Germans, in general, like to keep things in "Ordnung" and believe that there are correct ways to act and do things and ways that you shouldn't act or do things.
My wife was born and raised in Germany. If I step out of line, "Mein Frau will auch eine Blitzkrieg an Mich haben., just as her Mother did to her Father.

We live in Panama City Beach, FL and have grown tired of the beach, the springbreakers and hurricanes. We would love to find a nice city in the USA that has a strong German influence and culture.
Cullman, Alabama. Just look in the cemeteries...amazing number of German names. Odd thing is, though - it's dry. Not a beer in the whole county. Even their Oktoberfest is dry.
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Old 06-26-2007, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Alabama!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I agree on the UK, not on France. The only parts of the South with signifacnt French ancestry are Louisana and adjacent Gulf coastal areas in MS and TX (i.e., the Cajuns who came from Nova Scotia), and the Charleston SC area (Hueguenot settlement). Areas in the US with the most French ancestry would be New England, with smaller numbers in the Upper Midwest. (Even some in Western NY. Some of my ancestors emmigrated there from Alsace, currently a French province that has switched back and forth to Germany in the past several centuries.)
Don't forget Mobile, Alabama. LA (lower Alabama) was ruled by the French for many years. Mobile had the first Mardi Gras.
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Old 06-26-2007, 08:12 PM
MB2
 
Location: Sebastian/ FL
3,496 posts, read 8,695,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southlander View Post
Cullman, Alabama. Just look in the cemeteries...amazing number of German names. Odd thing is, though - it's dry. Not a beer in the whole county. Even their Oktoberfest is dry.
A "dry" Octoberfest???????
How does THAT work????
I get it....LOL....Cullman is where the Germans go for detox....huh..... !!!!
That's why it's dry.........
(*kidding people*)
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Old 06-27-2007, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Panama City Beach, Florida
118 posts, read 422,454 times
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Default Ah, yes, good ole Cullman, Alabama

Quote:
Originally Posted by Southlander View Post
Cullman, Alabama. Just look in the cemeteries...amazing number of German names. Odd thing is, though - it's dry. Not a beer in the whole county. Even their Oktoberfest is dry.
I used to live in Cullman and know many families with German names.
That's about the only thing they have in common with Germany or Germans. No Dirndls or Leaderhosen will be found there but you will find Liberty Overalls and Redman Chewing Tobacco ballcaps - and that's on the women.
The men usually wear either CAT or John Deer ballcaps.
Instead of Sauerkraut, you will find Collard Greens.
Instead of Pickled or smoked Herring, you will find fried Bass or Catfish
When I think of certain parts of Cullman, I think of the movie Deliverance - a bunch of good ole boys.
On the other hand, there are also some mansions all around Smith Lake.

One small part of the City of Cullman pays tribute to their German heritage and that just a small park with a little biddy house.
The rest of the town is typical strip malls, Lowes/Home Dept and Walmart.

It is still a dry county but that's because of the Baptists and the Moonshiners.
Yes, they are still making moonshine (along with Meth) in Cullman County.
As a matter of fact, just a few weeks ago, I was talking with a friend who still lives back in the backwoods, of Cullman where I used to live, a little spot in the road called Bremen and he told me that some of the people are making their own Ethanol and adding it to their gas.
Talk about German ingenuity!

Also for the first time in the history of Cullman County, more men are loosing their trailers because of their Meth Lab blowing up than they are to divorce!

It's funny how they pronounce the German names of the little communities, aka a holler. They have Bremen but pronounce it Bream-men. There is also a Berlin there that is pronounced BURRRlin.

I would still be living there if my wife could have taking living out in the woods, in such a rural area. She even made me quit chewing my terbacker!
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Old 03-17-2009, 10:01 PM
 
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I think this true, cities or state that are dominated by Germanic are better take a look at Minnesota or Iowa compare them to Kentucky or Mississippi.
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