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Old 03-18-2009, 03:13 PM
 
56,785 posts, read 81,149,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsmith View Post
As a person of 12.5% Sweedish anscesetory, I would love a Sweedish day of some sort! We can't forget that many of the first settlers to the Philadelphia area were Sweedish! Wilmington, DE, was founded by the Sweedes.
Very true. Jamestown NY has an unusually percentage of people of Swedish descent due to the furniture industry that was there. I believe it's at 18% or so.
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Old 03-18-2009, 11:37 PM
 
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Yes...it's called the superiority of the Aryan race. There was some big war over it a long time ago and the Germans proved their superiority without a doubt - twice.

I was born in a city the was founded by Germans and has a noticeable cultural influence...but I'm of French descent. Am I superior by association?
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Old 03-19-2009, 12:12 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,483,001 times
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I think it's not so much German ethnicity but their Lutheran religious beliefs, which they have in common with Scandanavians. From looking at both religious adherence maps and ancestry maps, I am struck by the concentration of both German people and religious adherents in the Upper Midwest. The difference being these religious people are conservative but in a less 'red' way than Southerners...i.e. the fact they don't have the death penalty in those states.

Lutherans have always seemed peace-loving, friendly and mostly decent people, with a strong ethic of helping those in need, but also to 'live and let live' and not impose their values on others like in other parts of the country. So in a way, yes, it has something to do with their ethnicity/nationality. The same can be seen in say Mormon or Amish communities. Very nice people even today (even sometimes creepily so!).
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Old 03-19-2009, 12:15 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gardener34 View Post
I read once that more caucasian americans can claim german as part of their ancestry more than any other country of origin. I forget the percentage.

So I am saying that by odds that would be a yes?
But many also state their ancestry as 'American' which would be mostly British/Irish/Scots. If you include them English is the largest group.
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Old 03-19-2009, 12:30 AM
 
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Lutherans are a major religion in the South as well...there you go again, grouping all southerners as "red" - I assume that's a political reference - and ultra religious. There are some very conservative religious organizations in the South, but it's not the majority of the population. There are huge numbers of more tolerant Baptist organizations; large pockets of Catholic populations (625,000 Catholics in the Atlanta Archdiocese); cities like Winston-Salem where the Moravian Church (also of German origin) is dominant and Greensboro where the Society of Friends has large numbers; the Methodist Church is a very large protesant organization in the South, as is Presbyterian, Lutheran, Episcopalian, and a long list of others - including Islamic, Hindu, Greek Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, and any other "style" of religious worshipers in existence. There are even Amish communities scattered throughout the South.
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Old 03-19-2009, 11:50 AM
 
5,861 posts, read 14,068,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I think it's not so much German ethnicity but their Lutheran religious beliefs, which they have in common with Scandanavians. From looking at both religious adherence maps and ancestry maps, I am struck by the concentration of both German people and religious adherents in the Upper Midwest. The difference being these religious people are conservative but in a less 'red' way than Southerners...i.e. the fact they don't have the death penalty in those states.

Lutherans have always seemed peace-loving, friendly and mostly decent people, with a strong ethic of helping those in need, but also to 'live and let live' and not impose their values on others like in other parts of the country. So in a way, yes, it has something to do with their ethnicity/nationality. The same can be seen in say Mormon or Amish communities. Very nice people even today (even sometimes creepily so!).
Um, not just Lutherans. Many Germans in the upper Midwest and the Great Lakes States are Roman Catholic. Big cities like Milwaukee, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Chicago, St. Louis, and small cities like Dubuque, IA and St Cloud, MN have strong German-Catholic roots.
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Old 03-19-2009, 01:55 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,330 posts, read 19,566,508 times
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Milwaukee has/had a large German population. It was my experience living among them for 9 years that many were racist, rigid, narrow-minded, one-dimensional, lacking a good sense of humor, introverted, regimented, and sour. Milwaukee has always been perceived as a "nice" town, but the lack of openness is deceiving. Living in such a place where many of these people are obedient, rigid, introverted, and quietly severely racist, is far from ideal IMO.
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Old 03-19-2009, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,264,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Yes...it's called the superiority of the Aryan race. There was some big war over it a long time ago and the Germans proved their superiority without a doubt - twice.

I was born in a city the was founded by Germans and has a noticeable cultural influence...but I'm of French descent. Am I superior by association?

I hope you were joking in the beginning of your post. It's hard to tell online.
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Old 03-19-2009, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,043 posts, read 102,757,343 times
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Short answer to the OP's question:

No
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Old 03-19-2009, 03:33 PM
 
56,785 posts, read 81,149,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Um, not just Lutherans. Many Germans in the upper Midwest and the Great Lakes States are Roman Catholic. Big cities like Milwaukee, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Chicago, St. Louis, and small cities like Dubuque, IA and St Cloud, MN have strong German-Catholic roots.
Very true. In Syracuse, the Assumption parish on the North side was a German-Catholic parish initially and still is to some degree.
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