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Old 03-29-2009, 11:16 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
Yes there was a huge swamp in the Toledo area. This site has a decent description Ohio Geography: Ohio Regions and Landforms
Now I know I am not losing my memory! Opening your link about halfway down it mentions "Prairie Peninsula". The little map shows part of W. Ohio, Central Indiana and a large part of Illinois as prairie or savannah. However most of the hilly areas in S. Indiana and S. Illinois were (and are today) forests. Even part of the Province of Ontario has a small amount of prairie or savannah.
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Old 03-29-2009, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
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Central Oklahoma, which is now partially forested, only has been since after the dust bowl. Most of Oklahoma with the exception of the Ozarks and Ouichitas was tall grass prairie.
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Old 03-29-2009, 08:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
Rougly a boundary formed by Interstate 35.

Fun fact: The Great Plains runs from Southern Canada all the way into northern Mexico.
I don't think I-35 works as a boundary. Here in MN, the forest cover roughly extends from perhaps 50 miles west of the Southeast corner of the state along the unglaciated area in the Mississippi Valley, up to the Twin Cities, then runs diagonally across the state up to the Red River Valley, reaching the Canadian border about 60 miles east of the ND border. Everything south/west of that line is prairie (mostly cropland today).
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Fresno,ca
322 posts, read 985,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
LMAO

I always respect a person who can be self-effacing and don't take themselves too seriously. Shoot, I wish I could count the number of times I have started a thread or written something that I later think, oh man, why did I do that?

Anyway, I don't think your question is a bad one at all.

I'd generally agree with Colts about the I-35 West division. At least in Texas. At the same time though, there are the East and West Cross Timbers region of the state which are a notable exception to the rule. It is not part of the true Southern forest area (which ends in East Texas), but it does break up the grasslands area of the state. In other words, coming due west out of Ft. Worth, one encounters the grasslands and praries and all....but then there is a broad swath of miles where the timberlands (mostly post oak) emerge once again.

lol...thanks...yeah i try.. pretty much if you can laugh at yourself and not take judgments and opinions seriously then...really there's never a reason to feel resentment towards anyone... pretty much anyone that says anything... people in general like to put meaning behind what someone says... all that does when people in general do that... is it creates conflict of opinion...and tension.... lol.. In my opinion..

you can tell im from cali.... being laid back and all personality wise.. but yeah.. sorry i kinda went way off the subject there lol

anyways great generalized area there I-35.... that's pretty much exactly right... thanks man... talk to you later
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Old 04-06-2009, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,356,272 times
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Here are the maps. You can see why Illinois' official nickname is "The Prairie State".
Attached Thumbnails
Where is the Cut off line Between the Start of the Eastern US Forest and the Grasslands of the Great Plains States?-oldgrowth3.jpg  
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