U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-29-2009, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Fresno,ca
322 posts, read 711,821 times
Reputation: 142

Advertisements

Im gonna try to guess on this one here from what little experience i have traveling..lol.

From North to South:

Central Western Minnesota
Eastern Nebraska and Most of Iowa
Eastern Kansas
Oklahoma City on Eastward in Eastern Central Oklahoma
From Fort Worth, Texas on Eastward , South to San Antonio, Texas
and Central Eastern Texas Onward East

That's my Assumption though...lol


and im only talking about the Temperate Deciduous Eastern US Forest here....k...lol

Western US Coniferous Forests are kinda Scattered In my opinion
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-29-2009, 01:06 AM
 
Location: Fresno,ca
322 posts, read 711,821 times
Reputation: 142
i'll write back to Myself...lol.. the most pointless Thread i ever posted... i mean how are you supposed to answer to it...lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 01:36 AM
 
2,249 posts, read 4,208,737 times
Reputation: 1959
Rougly a boundary formed by Interstate 35.

Fun fact: The Great Plains runs from Southern Canada all the way into northern Mexico.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 09:34 AM
Status: " On and off line interchangeably" (set 19 days ago)
 
9,825 posts, read 11,387,909 times
Reputation: 5054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Djames9 View Post
i'll write back to Myself...lol.. the most pointless Thread i ever posted... i mean how are you supposed to answer to it...lol
LMAO

I always respect a person who can be self-effacing and don't take themselves too seriously. Shoot, I wish I could count the number of times I have started a thread or written something that I later think, oh man, why did I do that?

Anyway, I don't think your question is a bad one at all.

I'd generally agree with Colts about the I-35 West division. At least in Texas. At the same time though, there are the East and West Cross Timbers region of the state which are a notable exception to the rule. It is not part of the true Southern forest area (which ends in East Texas), but it does break up the grasslands area of the state. In other words, coming due west out of Ft. Worth, one encounters the grasslands and praries and all....but then there is a broad swath of miles where the timberlands (mostly post oak) emerge once again.

Last edited by TexasReb; 03-29-2009 at 10:49 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 09:57 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
4,499 posts, read 5,181,386 times
Reputation: 3080
I believe before the pioneers came, most of Iowa, and large parts of Illinois, Indiana and even into Ohio (to a smaller extent) was tallgrass prairie. Most of Michigan, Wisconsin and about half of Minnesota was woodlands. Trees always grew in river and stream valleys even on the plains. And of course people plant them near their homes so some parts of Kansas or Nebraska are more forested then they used to be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 10:42 AM
 
2,249 posts, read 4,208,737 times
Reputation: 1959
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
I believe before the pioneers came, most of Iowa, and large parts of Illinois, Indiana and even into Ohio (to a smaller extent) was tallgrass prairie. Most of Michigan, Wisconsin and about half of Minnesota was woodlands. Trees always grew in river and stream valleys even on the plains. And of course people plant them near their homes so some parts of Kansas or Nebraska are more forested then they used to be.
Actually, its the reverse. In 1800, 90% of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio was forested. The forests were cleared/burned for farms, roads, building materials, and cities once the new settlers discovered the rich soils underneath.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 11:12 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
4,499 posts, read 5,181,386 times
Reputation: 3080
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
Actually, its the reverse. In 1800, 90% of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio was forested. The forests were cleared/burned for farms, roads, building materials, and cities once the new settlers discovered the rich soils underneath.
Not from what I read years ago in National Geographic. They are trying to restore Oak Savannahs near Chicago and Tallgrass Prairies in Illinois. Certainly sounded like it was more than 10% of the state before the farmers came.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,171 posts, read 6,780,811 times
Reputation: 1323
Cleveland used to be known as the "forest city" and the Cleveland Indians were the Forest City's for a while.

Quote:
Open professional baseball began in Cleveland during the 1869 season and one team was hired on salary for 1870, as in several other cities following the success of the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings, the first fully professional team. The leading Cleveland baseball club was Forest City, a nickname of the city itself. In the newspapers before and after 1870, the team was often called the Forest Citys, in the same generic way that the team from Chicago was sometimes called The Chicagos.
Cleveland Indians - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 11:46 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
4,499 posts, read 5,181,386 times
Reputation: 3080
Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
Cleveland used to be known as the "forest city" and the Cleveland Indians were the Forest City's for a while.


Cleveland Indians - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I am going by memory of what I read years ago but I believe most of Ohio was historically forested. There was some places outright prairie, some mixed areas called savannahs and even a huge swamp south of Toledo. Ohio probably even had buffalo at one time, although obviously nothing like the numbers out west on the plains. There are rumors that some buffalo actually made it all the way to Western New York!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,171 posts, read 6,780,811 times
Reputation: 1323
Yes there was a huge swamp in the Toledo area. This site has a decent description Ohio Geography: Ohio Regions and Landforms
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $89,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:43 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top