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Old 03-30-2009, 08:45 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,937,611 times
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The Missouri River is a good divider between the Great Plains and the Midwest core. This is especially true along and north of 42-43N. The further west you go the more semi-arid the climate gets and the lower the population density per county. Also, corn is IRRIGATED once you get west of 99-100W longitude in the Great Plains. This is a generally an unsustainable profligate use of aquifer water, and is especially concerning the further south you go in the Great Plains. The aquifer depth further north in Nebraska is actually much deeper.
The further west you go in the Great Plains the fewer Midwest style farms with corn and soybeans you will generally see. The crop types begin to transition toward wheat, alflafa, milo, and sugar beats.
Ranches become more numerous as you hit hillier terrain in the Sand Hills of Nebraska, the Flint Hills of Kansas, the Badlands of North and South Dakota, and the Smoky Hills of Kansas.
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Old 03-30-2009, 10:55 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,299,438 times
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If you only divide the US into a few regions, you could make an argument that "The Midwest" would naturally extend from the Rockies to the Appalachians. This would actually make Denver - seated at the far western edge of the High Plains and east of the Rockies - a "midwestern" city.
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Old 03-30-2009, 11:36 PM
 
421 posts, read 1,404,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Go out to Dodge City, KS or Rapid City, SD and count the cowboy boots. Then do the same in Youngstown and Ashtabula. Which one is the "real" Midwest?
You'll see few if any cowboy boots in Youngstown and Ashtabula. Those you see will probably be on the feet of bikers at Geneva-On-The-Lake on a summer day
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Old 03-31-2009, 02:57 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,361,353 times
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Ohio and N.D. don't seem that different for two places within the same region. I mean what about El Paso and Baltimore in the South! They're as different as you can get in the US.
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Old 03-31-2009, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,323 posts, read 9,568,403 times
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Ohio and ND are very different! My friend moved to ND from Ohio and said when she was driving around she felt like something was different and then she realized there were no trees! The winters in ND are also much more brutal than here in Ohio.
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Old 03-31-2009, 10:32 AM
 
5,858 posts, read 14,044,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Well...it's a good thing you aren't making the decisions. How silly to start dividing states into different regions.
Why do you say that? While it might not make sense for political reaons, it makes lots of sense if you are wanting to focus on social, economic, or cultural factors.
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Old 03-31-2009, 08:00 PM
 
Location: British Columbia.
343 posts, read 1,262,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
Ohio and ND are very different! My friend moved to ND from Ohio and said when she was driving around she felt like something was different and then she realized there were no trees! The winters in ND are also much more brutal than here in Ohio.

ND is very different from Ohio. There is more of a western feel.

Culturally and geologicaly speaking it is western.
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Old 04-01-2009, 02:24 PM
 
604 posts, read 1,666,179 times
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well alaska and hawaii are also in the same region....
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Old 04-01-2009, 05:24 PM
 
Location: British Columbia.
343 posts, read 1,262,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicken.or.the.nugget View Post
well alaska and hawaii are also in the same region....
Alaska and Hawaii are not in the same region. And i've never seen them grouped together.

Alaska is part of the Pacific Northwest, Hawaii is just in a category of its own.
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Old 04-01-2009, 05:37 PM
 
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St. Louis is no longer a gateway to the "West". I'd say Denver is more like it- a high plain city right next to the rockies. North Dakota isn't going to get much in the way of tourism for reasons unrelated to which city is identified as the gateway to the west.
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