U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-30-2009, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,259,536 times
Reputation: 1819

Advertisements

Nassau County, westernmost county on Long Island near the city:

Population: 1.3 million
Land area: 286 sq. mi
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-30-2009, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
1,576 posts, read 5,140,989 times
Reputation: 683
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
I'm just saying that the actual city of Milwaukee has a lower population density than the SUBURBS of NYC. It's actual fact, not statistic. So, most likely the person growing up in the NYC suburbs probably grew up in more of an urban area of them Milwaukee, unless the kid actually grew up in downtown Milwaukee. I'm not putting down that city. I'm just stating something that's factual. I'm sure it's a nice city.
True.
I'm sorry but i'm going to have to go with Rachael on this one.
I grew up in Newark which is considered a NYC suburb in a way, but it is very urban. And to have Jersey city and other big cities in the vicinity it feels a lot more urban than the actual city of Milwaukee.
And it's a fact that North Jersey and Long Island are the two hot spots for being the most densely populated areas in the country (i mean yea there's a couple counties with higher population density here and there in other areas, but it's not as compacted with numerous counties with very high population density).. the nyc metro for short

Union City, NJ is 50,000 pop per sq mi, and the town is a little ove 1sq mile! You wont find that in the Milwaukee area, or even the midwest at that.

But this is actually really off topic...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2009, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,155,964 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
Those starting out in the city get shares in Manhattan. Us teachers make up to 100,000 after working for about 18 or so years.

And where I'm moving to on Long Island, the population density is 7,700/sq mi.
Public school teachers in Milwaukee can earn $100,000 after 20 years too. They just don't have to pay $1100 a month for a studio apartment like people in NYC do. Like the other poster said, if firefighters can qualify for food stamps, then regular joes really have no place in Manhattan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newarkbomb View Post
True.
I'm sorry but i'm going to have to go with Rachael on this one.
I grew up in Newark which is considered a NYC suburb in a way, but it is very urban. And to have Jersey city and other big cities in the vicinity it feels a lot more urban than the actual city of Milwaukee.
And it's a fact that North Jersey and Long Island are the two hot spots for being the most densely populated areas in the country (i mean yea there's a couple counties with higher population density here and there in other areas, but it's not as compacted with numerous counties with very high population density).. the nyc metro for short

Union City, NJ is 50,000 pop per sq mi, and the town is a little ove 1sq mile! You wont find that in the Milwaukee area, or even the midwest at that.

But this is actually really off topic...
Union City, NJ is also more densely populated than NYC (27,147/sq mi). Big deal. I compared Bergen County to Milwaukee County because they had similar populations and land area. Newark, NJ isn't really a suburb in the traditional sense, it's kind of like Bridgeport, CT. At one time they were their own cities that just happened to be enveloped by the expanding NYC metropolitan area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2009, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
322 posts, read 788,947 times
Reputation: 177
The older guy. A kid doesn't always know where he or she is from. I never knew where anything was or about my hometown as a kid, but when I moved to Boston, I learned it really well. My hubby has lived in Fairbanks all his life and doesn't know his way around town or about stuff here as much as I do because he never really cared. I think people are defined by what they choose and what they know. Not to say that some adults don't grow up to become experts on their home town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2009, 11:01 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,437,579 times
Reputation: 6703
I think they're on equal footing, but with time a city kid who moves to the suburbs as an adult will gradually become more "suburban" in outlook, just as the suburban kid who chooses the city as an adult will become more "urban influenced." A kid might not "know" about where he or she is from, but they also absorb a lot just from experiencing daily life in the city. The 30-something adult originally from a suburb (not meaning an urban "suburb" which I think for the sake of this discussion should just be considered part of the city) has different experiences and perhaps expectations based on his or her childhood, teens, and 20s, but has also made a choice to embrace city life, and has experienced what it's like to live there as an adult. In general, if you were to compare two adults, then I think it would be where they choose to live as an adult that has more meaning, and not where they grew up.

I also think people's way of looking at life evolves with time and major life events, so a city parent with kids (regardless of where the parent originally grew up), for example, has a very different way of thinking about and experiencing the city than does a person without kids, or probably (not at that point to know!) a retiree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2009, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,259,536 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
Public school teachers in Milwaukee can earn $100,000 after 20 years too. They just don't have to pay $1100 a month for a studio apartment like people in NYC do. Like the other poster said, if firefighters can qualify for food stamps, then regular joes really have no place in Manhattan.


Union City, NJ is also more densely populated than NYC (27,147/sq mi). Big deal. I compared Bergen County to Milwaukee County because they had similar populations and land area. Newark, NJ isn't really a suburb in the traditional sense, it's kind of like Bridgeport, CT. At one time they were their own cities that just happened to be enveloped by the expanding NYC metropolitan area.

A lot of studios aren't 1100 here. I have a 1 bedroom for 750. They're around if you look for it.

My fiance and I are both teachers. We just bought a house in the suburbs just 10 miles outside the city. It's doable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2009, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Springfield VA
4,037 posts, read 8,087,483 times
Reputation: 1499
It depends on the lives of both individuals. What type of family is the 16 year old from? Where in NYC does the 30 year old live? What suburb is he from?

Let's say the 16 year old is from a poor neighborhood in Milwaukee, maybe a crime infested housing project and already has a kid on the way. And let's say that the NYC guy lives in say Greenwich Village and grew up in a nice upper middle class suburb of Milwaukee his entire life, went to a nice well known college, never had to work in college, and now has a secure well paid job.

Now who's more urban influenced? My vote is for the 16 year old. Some of these kids have done more in 16 years than most 30 year olds. It shouldn't be that way but that's unfortunately how it is for a lot of kids.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2009, 02:51 PM
 
Location: IL
381 posts, read 735,122 times
Reputation: 92
Depends in what part of the city the 16 year old grew up. If the teenager is more socially aware than the average peer and continues on that path, then I vote the 16 year old. The native, who is aware and curious, always trumps a newcomer who has never lived in an urban environment.

"The city spawns a particular type of person." - George Simmel
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2009, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
305 posts, read 364,472 times
Reputation: 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrence81 View Post
It depends on the lives of both individuals. What type of family is the 16 year old from? Where in NYC does the 30 year old live? What suburb is he from?

Let's say the 16 year old is from a poor neighborhood in Milwaukee, maybe a crime infested housing project and already has a kid on the way. And let's say that the NYC guy lives in say Greenwich Village and grew up in a nice upper middle class suburb of Milwaukee his entire life, went to a nice well known college, never had to work in college, and now has a secure well paid job.

Now who's more urban influenced? My vote is for the 16 year old. Some of these kids have done more in 16 years than most 30 year olds. It shouldn't be that way but that's unfortunately how it is for a lot of kids.
This begs the question, what does it mean to be "urban" influenced?
Because my understanding of your post it seems urban is just a euphemism for crime, or gang member.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2009, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Springfield VA
4,037 posts, read 8,087,483 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleMathYou View Post
This begs the question, what does it mean to be "urban" influenced?
Because my understanding of your post it seems urban is just a euphemism for crime, or gang member.
I agree it does beg the question. It's all fairly subjective. Urban influence could mean a nice kid who appreciates museums but I think that is the unfortunate minority.

When I think about the suburbanite I picture a successful educated person who has lived a sheltered life. Which is not a bad thing who wants to have kids who have kids and sell drugs but that is the unfortunate reality. When I think about a kid who grew up in Milwaukee in the city and not a nice suburb, I think of a kid who has seen a lot more in his 16 years than the 30 year old. I didn't say that he was neccesarily a gang member. He may have never committed a crime in his life but I'm sure he's witnessed it. I used to be a substitute teacher and worked at some pretty rough schools. Some of the most brilliant minds in America are in the projects. So I'm not making a blanket statement about all kids from urban areas. However, we can't ignore the fact that statiscally a kid in the city has a rougher life than a kid in the burbs. Even if he comes from a good home he is going to be surrounded by those that did not. So I have to stand by my previous post.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top