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Old 04-10-2009, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,231,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Hmmm... is this a sarcastic comment about a lack of agriculture in Michigan? I think it is, although it's hard to pick up sarcasm in written form.

Just to set the record straight, there is a ton of agriculture in Michigan.
Michigan's agriculture mostly grows the kinds of low-rainfall crops that are common in North Dakota, like potatoes and sugar beets. The thumb, being very flat, is easy to irrigate. but northern Michigan actually comes quie close to being classified hydrologically as a semi-desert. Annual rainfall is the only definition of a desert, regardless of that the landscape might look like. Desert is under 10 inches of rain per year, semi-arid is 10-20, and some places in Michigan are barely 25.
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Old 04-11-2009, 07:13 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Quote:
Michigan's agriculture mostly grows the kinds of low-rainfall crops that are common in North Dakota, like potatoes and sugar beets. The thumb, being very flat, is easy to irrigate. but northern Michigan actually comes quie close to being classified hydrologically as a semi-desert. Annual rainfall is the only definition of a desert, regardless of that the landscape might look like. Desert is under 10 inches of rain per year, semi-arid is 10-20, and some places in Michigan are barely 25.
Well, it's all very interesting, to say the least. Had no idea that those areas of the state were so dry. I guess that would explain the dust storms that I saw the last time I ventured into the Thumb.

There are areas of Michigan that produce corn and soybeans too, though. Michigan was ranked 11th in corn production and 12th in soybean production in 2004. Most of it is concentrated in the southern 1/3 of the state though.
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Old 07-03-2018, 09:25 AM
 
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Just visited the Desert of Maine yesterday. Not technically a desert because it gets plenty of rainfall, it is actually a glacial silt bed, exposed by poor farming practices which eroded the soil and allowed the desert-like terrain to surface and grow by the wind blowing the silt around causing many acres of forest to be covered by what looks like sand. Gradually, decaying vegetation forms on top of the silt allowing more baby pine trees to appear around the edges. Many of the large trees are half buried in silt and appear much shorter then they really are. The branches have adapted into roots because of the slow progression of rising silt which reaches 90 feet in depth in some places. Very interesting place near L.L. Bean in Freeport.
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Old 07-03-2018, 02:56 PM
 
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The Chihuahuan in the Trans-Pecos in West Texas that extends from Pecos,Texas to El Paso on I-20 and I-10 is the easternmost to the best of my knowledge.I live close to it.
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Old 07-07-2018, 10:49 PM
 
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While technically not considerd a desert in the modern sense, large swaths of semi arid high plains stretching from Montana to Texas were once considered to be " The Great American Desert" and deemed to be unsuitable for agriculture and even human habitation by some of our earliest pioneers. Just to the east of me where i live in Denver, it is brown, dry, treeless and flat and certainly looks "deserted"
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Old 07-08-2018, 01:49 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,376 posts, read 1,194,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
My guess would be either somewhere in Texas or maybe the badlands of the Dakotas?
I know I'm replying to a post that's almost 10 years old, but the Badlands in North and South Dakota aren't a desert at all. These areas are just rugged buttes that have been exposed due to erosion. Otherwise, the surrounding landscape is shortgrass prairie and gets far too much rainfall to ever classify as a desert.
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Old 07-08-2018, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Somewhere in far west Texas. I used to live in West Texas and though where I lived wasn't a desert, you could sense the transition. It was very different from the grasslands in the north of the state and a world apart from the pine forests of the east.
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Old 07-13-2018, 04:46 AM
 
5,858 posts, read 14,044,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
I know I'm replying to a post that's almost 10 years old, but the Badlands in North and South Dakota aren't a desert at all. These areas are just rugged buttes that have been exposed due to erosion. Otherwise, the surrounding landscape is shortgrass prairie and gets far too much rainfall to ever classify as a desert.
True, but I do recall seeing cactus growing in the far NW corner of N. Dakota.
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Old 07-13-2018, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
True, but I do recall seeing cactus growing in the far NW corner of N. Dakota.
The Eastern prickly pear cactus is actually native to all states in the lower 48 except for Maine; most people are entirely unaware of this. In fact, you can find it growing wild in bare, sandy spots in even the wettest climates in the US.
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Old 07-13-2018, 05:00 PM
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Location: Ontario
7,261 posts, read 4,494,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
The Eastern prickly pear cactus is actually native to all states in the lower 48 except for Maine; most people are entirely unaware of this. In fact, you can find it growing wild in bare, sandy spots in even the wettest climates in the US.
Yes, even native to some areas in Canada too.

I saw native prickly pear cactus at Point Pelee National Park in SW Ontario.

Also in the Badlands of Alberta in Drumheller at 51N
Ditto in desert areas in BC just west of Kamloops, also at 51N.
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