U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-05-2009, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,964,144 times
Reputation: 2129

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyJohnWilson View Post
i'm not sure i know what you mean by all this. could you rephrase this into layman's terms?




well, i think of those as geological regions, not cultural regions. not all of the region of appalachia is in the mountains.

plus, the peidmont region is from new jersey to alabama, thats not a culutural region.

once past appalachia, there aren't significant changes (or not significant enough) cultural differences when traveling westbound in these states.
Jimmy keep in mind you will never please everyone
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-05-2009, 02:55 PM
 
871 posts, read 1,958,741 times
Reputation: 596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geechie North View Post
Northern Cities Shift@Everything2.com.

The NW terminus of this shift is the Milwaukee metro area. This shift line denotes a cultural region of its own.

As far as the Piedmont, Mtns, and Coastal Plain differences, Southern History explains that phenom, and volumes have been written about it.

Mainly, it has to do with the plantation system and the crops of rice and cotton (Long Staple). Here's an article which speaks to its effect on contemporary politics:
A South Carolina Primary Primer by Robert Jeffrey

nooooooooooooooo, this is ridiculous. the piedmont is not its own cultural region on this type of scale. if my map was "cultural regions of south carolina" then yea, i'd put it in there. overall, its part of the same cultural region (even appalachia is just a sub-region).

every state has different regions, but if those regions bear enough similarity to neighboring ones (on this type of scale), they won't be labeled as separte. i'm sure there are some mild changes, but honestly do you think winsboro south carolina is sooooooo different from orangeburg south carolina?

maybe in south carolina they can tell the difference, but to someone from ohio (or anywhere else in the country) they are south carolinians.

there are states that have significant enough cultural changes within their state to be labeled as separate regions. the best examples of this would be texas and florida. however south carolina does not fall into this category.

same goes for wisconsin.

if you would like me to do a map of wisconsin's cultural regions, or a map of south carolina's cultural regions i will gladly make one for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2009, 03:06 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 7,024,048 times
Reputation: 796
You know, if you're going to reinvent the wheel, maybe you should be sure your version is round and can roll:

Culture Regions in the United States

From it:

Note the Piedmont v Coastal Plain.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...folk_areas.gif.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...re/midland.gif


End of my input.

Good day.

Last edited by Geechie North; 04-05-2009 at 03:47 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2009, 12:59 AM
 
871 posts, read 1,958,741 times
Reputation: 596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geechie North View Post
You know, if you're going to reinvent the wheel, maybe you should be sure your version is round and can roll:

Culture Regions in the United States

From it:

Note the Piedmont v Coastal Plain.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...folk_areas.gif.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...re/midland.gif


End of my input.

Good day.

yea, i don't really find these useful. the first map suggests that i should define my regions based off of ethic background, and the second defines them by "diffusion of pioneer culture". here is an example of how these maps aren't relevant: according to this, tenessee and the pacific northwest have the same level of "diffusion of pioneer culture". so i guess they in the same region.

these maps may help support your claim of how my map is wrong, but i don't think these factors decide cultural regions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2009, 10:27 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,808 times
Reputation: 10
IMHO: very good job on this--Only thing I would change is that Ohio (northeastern region) should be included in the Appalachian region on your map and not be considered culturally like Michigan and New York and Wisconsin. A majority of current NE Ohioans either came from places like West Virginia or their parents or grandparents did, so Ohio is primarily NOT made up of the descendants of the original people who moved to Ohio from New England or (not descendants of the people who were the original Ohioans who came to Ohio as part of the Connecticut Western Reserve--circa 1800), nor are most probably descendants of immigrants from Europe who first arrived in the US via Ellis Island during the waves of immigration that brought people to the Great Lakes Region. A large portion of Clevelanders descend from people who once lived in the the deep south. It appears that most descendants of people from the Connecticut Western Reserve that made up Ohio are not currently living in northeastern Ohio, but moved away (north, south, east and west) in droves when the industry died out in northeastern Ohio circa the 1970s and afterward.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Miami
763 posts, read 3,227,321 times
Reputation: 257
Great work!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 07:48 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,285,868 times
Reputation: 2785
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyJohnWilson View Post
nooooooooooooooo, this is ridiculous. the piedmont is not its own cultural region on this type of scale. if my map was "cultural regions of south carolina" then yea, i'd put it in there. overall, its part of the same cultural region (even appalachia is just a sub-region).

every state has different regions, but if those regions bear enough similarity to neighboring ones (on this type of scale), they won't be labeled as separte. i'm sure there are some mild changes, but honestly do you think winsboro south carolina is sooooooo different from orangeburg south carolina?

maybe in south carolina they can tell the difference, but to someone from ohio (or anywhere else in the country) they are south carolinians.

there are states that have significant enough cultural changes within their state to be labeled as separate regions. the best examples of this would be texas and florida. however south carolina does not fall into this category.

same goes for wisconsin.

if you would like me to do a map of wisconsin's cultural regions, or a map of south carolina's cultural regions i will gladly make one for you.
Isn't east state with its subregions viewed that same way outside of the state? You seem to place more importance on a specific California coastal culture versus the rest of California culture and even separate a northern versus southern coastal culture..."but to someone from Ohio they are Californians". In Texas, you seem to pay close attention to the different cultural sections of the state and carefully place them in 4 different cultural regions..."but to someone from Ohio they are Texans".

Every state in the U.S. is JUST as culturally diverse as Florida, Texas, and California and all have more than one VERY different cultures within their boundaries. If you're going to recognize some, then you should recognize all...and not diminish their uniqueness or importance.

I can tell you from experience that the Piedmont region of Virginia/NC/SC/Georgia is completely different from the coastal plains and Applachian regions - different enough to warrant its own separate region under your philosophy. These areas are as different from one another as many of the small areas you designated as separate regions in other parts of the country.

My vote would be for larger defined regions based on geographical location, then smaller subregions within those large regions. Then you don't end up giving more recognition to some cultural differences while ignoring others that are just as pronounced.

Last edited by DeaconJ; 04-11-2009 at 07:57 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,058,997 times
Reputation: 4482
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyJohnWilson View Post
i have taken suggestions on the map and have updated it.

texas has been adjusted. california coastal regions have been added. great lakes region has been added. south west conneticut has been added to the mid atlantic. and various other lines have been adjusted slightly.

Your "South" extends too deep into western Oklahoma and Texas. In my opinion OKC is the westernmost city that could be classified as a "southern" city and that is ONLY because of the conservative religious climate there. Immediately west of OKC you get into territory that is clearly Great Plains. Instead, your "south" should extend farther up into Missouri. The I-44 corridor and southward are the Ozarks and they are clearly Southern culturally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 10:57 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,131,465 times
Reputation: 5742
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Your "South" extends too deep into western Oklahoma and Texas. In my opinion OKC is the westernmost city that could be classified as a "southern" city and that is ONLY because of the conservative religious climate there. Immediately west of OKC you get into territory that is clearly Great Plains. Instead, your "south" should extend farther up into Missouri. The I-44 corridor and southward are the Ozarks and they are clearly Southern culturally.
LOL I just replied to another post of yours, bchris, so I hope you don't think I am just stalking you here! LOL

But seriously, JJW pegged it very well as to how far into Texas "the South" extends. He made the very real distinction between the true Interior Southwest and the South in terms of historical and cultural influences. Most of West Texas was overwhelmingly settled by Southerners and it is that culture which dominates even today. This is evident in everything from numbers of Southern Baptist Churches to the speech patterns (i.e. Southern American English).

As far as the "Great Plains" goes, while the very upper Texas Panhandle has a lot of shared traits with some of the lower Plains states, its influence is extremely limited to non-existent elsewhere within the state. That is to say, the "Plains" is really a far western sub-region of the Midwest. And other than the small above mentioned parts of Texas, the state has nothing in common at all --- in the historical and cultural sense -- with any area north of Oklahoma.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,579,296 times
Reputation: 3235
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
As far as the "Great Plains" goes, while the very upper Texas Panhandle has a lot of shared traits with some of the lower Plains states, its influence is extremely limited to non-existent elsewhere within the state. That is to say, the "Plains" is really a far western sub-region of the Midwest. And other than the small above mentioned parts of Texas, the state has nothing in common at all --- in the historical and cultural sense -- with any area north of Oklahoma.
Finally someone that recognizes this! The great plains are Midwestern (they extend all the way to Iowa and Illinois), and saying that Texas and Oklahoma share plains characteristics is like saying that Northern Kentucky has Great Lakes characteristics. These areas border the Midwest, but overall, they are Southern states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top