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Old 04-21-2009, 09:41 PM
 
481 posts, read 1,638,187 times
Reputation: 317

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Interstate 80!!! Are you kidding me? That is not the southern boundary of the Midwest by far. Maybe the Upper Midwest, but the true southern boundary of the Midwest is the Ohio River and roughly U.S. Highway 60 in Missouri.
Read 2 or 3 posts up, he was stating the boundary line between the upper midwest (eastern Dakotas, MN, WI west of Milwaukee, Northern IA) and the rest of the midwest.

And yeah, I-70 or I-80 sounds about right..."Fargo" sure as heck wasn't about Dalton, Illinois...
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Old 04-21-2009, 10:20 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,912,876 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haver View Post
Read 2 or 3 posts up, he was stating the boundary line between the upper midwest (eastern Dakotas, MN, WI west of Milwaukee, Northern IA) and the rest of the midwest.

And yeah, I-70 or I-80 sounds about right..."Fargo" sure as heck wasn't about Dalton, Illinois...
I-70 for the Upper Midwest is far from an ideal boundary. The Upper Midwest extends no further south than the Great Lakes. Also, true southern culture and dialect doesn't start until you are at least 100 miles to the south of Interstate 70 at any given point.
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Old 02-09-2010, 06:16 AM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,119,659 times
Reputation: 279
I was thinking of culture regions, one idea could be an Ozark culture which would be a sister culture to Southern Appalacia. Other concepts which looks a bit touched on is grouping cultures in families and some areas which could be done as colored stripes representing hybrid areas (example between Midwest and Southern culture) which have aspects similar to multiple families and over time could change.

Another thought is thinking of possible future cultures and I picture a culture region forming in the Atlanta, Charlotte, and Raleigh areas as a "New Southern" culture due to high numbers of transplants and immigrants altering the cultural landscape which does pop up in things like politics. It is similar as to how Florida from around the I-4 corridor South isn't Southern anymore and some areas in Texas are also having this happen.

One thing nobody has mentioned is what baselines are used to determine a cultural area. I figured the Southern area shoud be based in part on weather Baptists specifically and Evangelical Protestants are the largest religious group. (Exception made for Cajuns which should be a Southern subset group) This is a reason why I have seen one map showing most of Missouri outside of STL and KC being Southern is the religious makeup. *fun fact, % of Evangelical Christians in 2000 in Missouri is near equal to Georgia and might be a larger % now*

Coming from St. Louis, I have noticed that if there is a cultural crossroads of the US it is somewhere in a 100-mile area of St. Louis which some areas seem to go back and forth between regions over the last 200 years. I would put the St. Louis area as a striped yellow/red area though it is about 80% Midwestern but is as well as other places in Missouri starting to diverge culturally from the Midwest. Actually a fun subplot to this thread is the idea of how regions will change in the future.
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Old 02-11-2010, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,477,679 times
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There is a huge difference between the western great lakes and the eastern. The western great lakes are solidly midwestern in dialect and culture. Anywhere in Mi, Wi and Ind should be included in this. The eastern great lakes are far more connected to the northeast states. Buffalo NY is nothing like cities in the western lakes. Although it is not as strong as New England or NJ ive noticed an eastern accent in buffalo Ny. Midwestern culture seems to begin to fade as you head east from Cleveland. I think the eastern lakes region should begin at about I-77. As a general rule, if carbonated beverages are NOT being called pop, you are too far east to be considered in the midwest. There is no such culturaly unified great lakes region, since the lakes are so large they stretch from the interior northeast, deep into the midwest.
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Old 02-13-2010, 02:27 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,390 posts, read 55,223,333 times
Reputation: 15488
finally, someone understands California

+1
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Old 02-14-2010, 11:09 PM
 
Location: wandering LA
6 posts, read 13,732 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
finally, someone understands California

+1
yeah, the california part is right on
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Old 02-16-2010, 07:21 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,456,335 times
Reputation: 4337
Quote:
The eastern great lakes are far more connected to the northeast states. Buffalo NY is nothing like cities in the western lakes. Although it is not as strong as New England or NJ ive noticed an eastern accent in buffalo Ny.
I'm not sure if I agree with this. I don't know what the Buffalo accent sounds like, but I listen to a radio show that is syndicated in Grand Rapids, MI and also Albany, NY. And one weird thing I've noticed is that the Grand Rapids, MI accent and the Albany accent are VERY similar. In fact, people call in from Ohio, Illinois, Indiana and Minnesota, and none of them sound as close to the Grand Rapids accent as the callers from Albany, NY. I've always found that to be interesting. Just an observation.
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Old 02-16-2010, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Long Island
17 posts, read 9,317 times
Reputation: 17
I don't get this, or see the point in this.

People are pretty much the same everywhere in the US.
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Old 02-16-2010, 08:25 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,456,335 times
Reputation: 4337
Quote:
I don't get this, or see the point in this.

People are pretty much the same everywhere in the US.
Not true.

For example: People from Long Island are nothing like people from everywhere else.
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Old 02-16-2010, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,032,692 times
Reputation: 3829
Coastal California needs to be narrower to the west, NYs Hudson River Valley and Eastern Long Island needs to "blend" with New England
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