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Old 12-09-2017, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,560 posts, read 743,963 times
Reputation: 1668

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Tallahassee, FL exceeded my expectations on a recent visit. There has been a lot of revitalization around the midtown, downtown and nearby Cascades Park, and it is a pleasant easy walk from the capital to both major universities (FSU and FA&M). The tree canopies are beautiful and the topography is a lot hillier than in most of Florida. Very different from most of the state, yet a world apart from nearby rural north Florida and south Georgia as well.
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Old 12-09-2017, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,631 posts, read 8,318,123 times
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Albuquerque: Home to supremely rich Mexican food, amazing food town as it is.

Central California Coast (Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey): Where the best Mexican seafood and barbecue in California is located (and the best scenery and quality of life).

Denver: The leafy sprawl that will reach Wyoming.

El Paso: It feels like it takes forever to go through the city, it just doesn't stop and keeps on going, the development spills in each direction minus north where there appears to be a military base, but development flows from Texas into New Mexico and Mexico and it just keeps on going and going. It feels far larger in person than the numbers on paper indicate and far denser than anything else in its state or the South in general over such an expanse (sans Miami/Fort Lauderdale).

Honolulu: So remote and isolated from the rest of the populated world, therefore it must be so peaceful and serene due to that fact.

Los Angeles: When driving across the urban expanse east to west, it takes three hours and a half to drive from the place where the contiguous development begins in a semi-desert terrain to the terminus on the shores of the Pacific in Santa Monica. Probably will either come close to equaling or surpass Greater New York in population someday many decades down the line but for the moment, the question about Los Angeles is how much further will the expanse go?

New York: Much cleaner than advertised (sans the subway system).

Rio Grande Valley (Texas): It's a place with 1.35 million people and technically located on the American side of the border but feels entirely like a place on the Mexican side of the border should feel like. You need to know Spanish here, often for even basic things like going out to a restaurant.

San Diego: What life must feel like in a box created by natural barriers (West - ocean; East - deserts and mountains; South - a protected international border; North - a massive military base). A solitary bubble.

Seattle: A suped up Minneapolis with scenery.

Tampa: Far larger and more formidable than people realize. Probably a longterm threat to Miami with regards to being #1 in Florida.

Washington, District of Columbia: Government, defense, bureaucracy, and the history of governing seep into almost every fiber of Washington's existence.
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Old 12-10-2017, 12:30 PM
 
1,614 posts, read 1,060,326 times
Reputation: 587
Jacksonville fl. Didn't know what to expect when I went there for a day visit. Downtown was pretty bland to me. Not the vibe I would think from a city it's size but the beach made up for it

Pittsburg. Went for work and I was amazed at how nice the city was compared to what I thought before. Many bars and restaurants that the food was very good. Love the hills going into the city

Columbus oh. Don't know what to say about it. Before my first visit I thought It would of been more than what it was, but I actually enjoyed it. At the same time a city it's size is lacking alot but again I enjoy it. Imo Charlotte which reminds me alot of Columbus but smaller has a ton of more things to do with a nicer downtown
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Old 12-10-2017, 12:52 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,571,690 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Facts Kill Rhetoric View Post
Albuquerque: Home to supremely rich Mexican food, amazing food town as it is.

Central California Coast (Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey): Where the best Mexican seafood and barbecue in California is located (and the best scenery and quality of life).

Denver: The leafy sprawl that will reach Wyoming.

El Paso: It feels like it takes forever to go through the city, it just doesn't stop and keeps on going, the development spills in each direction minus north where there appears to be a military base, but development flows from Texas into New Mexico and Mexico and it just keeps on going and going. It feels far larger in person than the numbers on paper indicate and far denser than anything else in its state or the South in general over such an expanse (sans Miami/Fort Lauderdale).

Honolulu: So remote and isolated from the rest of the populated world, therefore it must be so peaceful and serene due to that fact.

Los Angeles: When driving across the urban expanse east to west, it takes three hours and a half to drive from the place where the contiguous development begins in a semi-desert terrain to the terminus on the shores of the Pacific in Santa Monica. Probably will either come close to equaling or surpass Greater New York in population someday many decades down the line but for the moment, the question about Los Angeles is how much further will the expanse go?

New York: Much cleaner than advertised (sans the subway system).

Rio Grande Valley (Texas): It's a place with 1.35 million people and technically located on the American side of the border but feels entirely like a place on the Mexican side of the border should feel like. You need to know Spanish here, often for even basic things like going out to a restaurant.

San Diego: What life must feel like in a box created by natural barriers (West - ocean; East - deserts and mountains; South - a protected international border; North - a massive military base). A solitary bubble.

Seattle: A suped up Minneapolis with scenery.

Tampa: Far larger and more formidable than people realize. Probably a longterm threat to Miami with regards to being #1 in Florida.

Washington, District of Columbia: Government, defense, bureaucracy, and the history of governing seep into almost every fiber of Washington's existence.
Why would you need to know Spanish in RGV? The US born people there all speak English.

And Spanish is close enough to English that at least you could read the menu items, it's not like Chinese or Arabic that uses a differerent writing system.
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Old 12-10-2017, 01:00 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,571,690 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I tend to put the top cities on a pedestal that can't be reached, with NY and SF at the pinnacle. Both are great cities and I've walked endlessly in both on numerous visits. I continue to love both, but based on more familiarity in the last decade my feeling about both is more a strong admiration vs. pure love. The most notable point is that once I thought they were packed with busy areas all over, and the truth is much of any city -- even Manhattan -- is quiet streets.

I underrated Philly, Pittsburgh, and Minneapolis before visiting. Philly should get Boston-level attention for urban form, and might be the most walkable of the top cities in the US. Pittsburgh had surprisingly strong urban districts, and a love the hillside and ravine 2/3 gone but still nice looking vibe. Minneapolis I liked for the river, growing urban districts, the university, bikeability, and the endless blocks of trees and old houses.
I'm okay with Philly being underrated, I don't want it to become expensive like Boston or New York. It's probably going down that path already.
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Old 12-10-2017, 03:33 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,297,032 times
Reputation: 3204
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Why would you need to know Spanish in RGV? The US born people there all speak English.

And Spanish is close enough to English that at least you could read the menu items, it's not like Chinese or Arabic that uses a differerent writing system.
Have you ever been to the RGV? Its literally right on the border, so there is alot of back and forth. Knowing Spanish isn't required, but he is correct, if you don't speak at least some Spanish it will be more difficult.
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Old 12-15-2017, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,631,010 times
Reputation: 2893
Salt Lake City: Way above it's weight on amenities, very good transportation system, very well-planned city with lots of very interesting historic areas with nice brick homes. The city also have a large nightlife and feels more awake at night than most much larger cities.

Riverside, California: Very clean, very nice homes, well-planned city. Very slow paced though. Was there in the winter and the hills are very lush and green.

Reno, Nevada: Very underrated city with a huge university campus. Lots of really nice mid-century areas with large lots and trees. Very nice downtown with a large skyline and a nice river park. Friendliest people out of any Western City I have been to. Also very close proximity to Lake Tahoe and Ski Resorts and only a couple hours from Sacramento and about three hours to the Bay Area.

Council Bluffs, Iowa: Hilly and lush terrain, lots of really nice historic areas, friendly, lots of really nice civic amenities as the city has lots of tax revenue from the gaming industry. Well-planned and quaint.
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Old 12-15-2017, 12:30 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,363,867 times
Reputation: 10919
I was surprised at Detroit, I was expecting the worst and really loved the downtown area. Hopping with people all over, great parks, awesome architecture and nice people, lots to do. They're making huge strides with that city, so much going on. I saw they just broke ground on the city's tallest building, and the new arena and entertainment district, the new light rail, new parks downtown, etc.

I was disappointed at Phoenix, very ugly built environment and the whole metro was really parceled off by a grid of 6 lane roads with strip malls on the corners and sound barriers everywhere. It felt so devoid of life.
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Old 12-15-2017, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, NYC
2,134 posts, read 1,389,008 times
Reputation: 1544
Pittsburgh - A rather pleasant city. Thought it would be more Midwest blah, but it has some middle of the roadness with the East Coast.

Los Angelos - So dang spread out and I hated the culture. I like energy, but people I met there like to relax. I can't do that. Too much weed, but I went in expecting that. I didn't drive thank god.

San Francisco - And I thought the gentrification is somewhat bad in NYC! I now understand why people call it San Franciscoization or w/e. It's crazy expensive for me, even coming from living in Manhattan. I was hoping for some urban tech mecha, but was supremely disappointed. Somewhat similar with Oakland, but not to as much an extreme.

Boston - Didn't expect to care, but the city is rather delightful! I do love every trip I make there, though I do find it closes way too early, especially for being in the BosWash cooridor.

DC - I dunno... I found the food bland and the city rather soulless. My coworker got food poisoning from a 4.5 star ramen place. Very odd.

Philly - I actually found Philly to be a really good all around city. Definitely a few steps down as far as NYC goes, but I liked its lack of pretentiousness. It feels like this is going away, but otherwise I really liked it.

Detroit - I had some expectation it wouldn't be bad, but 2 of my friends were mugged in broad daylight near the Ren Center downtown in 2012. I feel like the People Mover was somewhat a middle finger at mass transit given it's a very car centric city and the thing goes in a loop downtown. I haven't been back since, mostly because I have no reason to. My cousin moved out for good.
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Old 12-16-2017, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,500 posts, read 1,350,579 times
Reputation: 1723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Javawood View Post
Pittsburgh - A rather pleasant city. Thought it would be more Midwest blah, but it has some middle of the roadness with the East Coast.

Los Angelos - So dang spread out and I hated the culture. I like energy, but people I met there like to relax. I can't do that. Too much weed, but I went in expecting that. I didn't drive thank god.

San Francisco - And I thought the gentrification is somewhat bad in NYC! I now understand why people call it San Franciscoization or w/e. It's crazy expensive for me, even coming from living in Manhattan. I was hoping for some urban tech mecha, but was supremely disappointed. Somewhat similar with Oakland, but not to as much an extreme.

Boston - Didn't expect to care, but the city is rather delightful! I do love every trip I make there, though I do find it closes way too early, especially for being in the BosWash cooridor.

DC - I dunno... I found the food bland and the city rather soulless. My coworker got food poisoning from a 4.5 star ramen place. Very odd.

Philly - I actually found Philly to be a really good all around city. Definitely a few steps down as far as NYC goes, but I liked its lack of pretentiousness. It feels like this is going away, but otherwise I really liked it.

Detroit - I had some expectation it wouldn't be bad, but 2 of my friends were mugged in broad daylight near the Ren Center downtown in 2012. I feel like the People Mover was somewhat a middle finger at mass transit given it's a very car centric city and the thing goes in a loop downtown. I haven't been back since, mostly because I have no reason to. My cousin moved out for good.
More Midwest blah? Maybe you should just stick to your precious East Coast!
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