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Old 12-26-2017, 10:02 PM
 
6,563 posts, read 13,776,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanenthusiastfromKC View Post
Boston was my biggest letdown it was just very eh.. for it's size.

Louisville surprised me for what I expected it to be. I thought it would be a city we would stay a night in and leave but actually it was pretty awesome. I LOVE the districts that are in downtown awesomely artsy...
The funny part is the best part of Louisville is NOT downtown but the urban neighborhoods 3-5 miles south, east, northeast. That said, downtown is pretty awesome now too.


I TOTALLY disagree on Boston. Pound for pound its's culturally awesome and so beautiful, clean walkable. That said, it has a very poor nightlife and doesn't feel like a "city that doesn't sleep" compared to your typical centers or even smaller cities like New Orleans, Vegas, etc.
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Old 12-27-2017, 12:12 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,619,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
The funny part is the best part of Louisville is NOT downtown but the urban neighborhoods 3-5 miles south, east, northeast. That said, downtown is pretty awesome now too.


I TOTALLY disagree on Boston. Pound for pound its's culturally awesome and so beautiful, clean walkable. That said, it has a very poor nightlife and doesn't feel like a "city that doesn't sleep" compared to your typical centers or even smaller cities like New Orleans, Vegas, etc.
That's not weird to me at all, a lot of the best city neighborhoods are not directly in the city's downtown, but rather urban mixed use neighborhoods within reasonable distance of the downtown.
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Old 12-27-2017, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,238 posts, read 67,413,573 times
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Buffalo: I initially thought Buffalo would have a thriving Downtown surrounded by decaying blighted neighborhoods in all directions. Instead when I visited (on a weekend mind you) I found that Downtown, while clean, was downright desolate with not much to do (the SPOT Coffee location Downtown was hoppin' and awesome, though!) I then walked for miles all around adjacent Allentown and Elmwood Village and fell in love with those neighborhoods. Both of those neighborhoods could give the best urban neighborhoods of Pittsburgh a run for their money. The tree-lined streets and vernacular residential architecture made my tail wag, too!

Cincinnati: I never knew a lot about Cincinnati, so prior to visiting I had mediocre expectations for it. Instead I found out that I really enjoyed the city. Downtown, Over-the-Rhine, and Mt. Adams are three awesome neighborhoods. I love how dense, urban, and walkable, the Northern Kentucky suburbs just across the Ohio River from Downtown Cincinnati are. Cincinnati reminds me a lot of Pittsburgh with its greenery, older architecture, and hills---it's just more socially conservative and a LOT cheaper now that Pittsburgh is trying to become the next Seattle. Who can argue against Jungle Jim's or Skyline Chili, too? The zoo is great. So are the museums. Mass transit? Meh.

Cleveland: A lot of Ohio people hate Pennsylvania (size envy, I guess). A lot of Pennsylvania people hate Ohio ("flyover country" snobbery, I guess). As such, I first went to Cleveland expect it to be some sort of bombed-out war zone---the "Mistake on the Lake" if you will. Instead I found that while about half the city (far east and far south of Downtown) was just as described the Downtown was amazingly vibrant. I loved Playhouse Square with the giant chandelier suspended over the roadway and all of the Times Square-like TV screens around. In addition, Heinen's has to be the NICEST urban grocery store I've ever been in. The streets were a little wide for my tastes as a pedestrian, but then again I've never experienced the heavy traffic issues in Cleveland I experience in Pittsburgh, and Pittsburgh is a smaller city. Ohio City was awesome. I feel Cleveland boosters on here overhype Detroit-Shoreway and Tremont, though. I found myself bored in both neighborhoods in well under an hour. Little Italy, while compact, is much more "authentic" than Pittsburgh's Bloomfield, which is our Little Italy. University Circle, which is Cleveland's "eds and meds" neighborhood, reminds me a lot of Pittsburgh's Oakland. While Pittsburgh's Oakland is very crowded, concrete-y, and dirty, University Circle has much more greenery intertwined with the urban fabric, feels cleaner, and feels less claustrophobic.

Erie: Erie only slightly surpassed my expectations. A lot of Erie natives now live in/around Pittsburgh, and I've befriended many. They all speak fondly (albeit not "highly") of Erie, so I went there expecting an average city. I found the city to punch above-average. For a city of 100,000 it has a lot of amenities found in much larger cities. Presque Isle State Park literally blew me away with its breathtaking beauty. The city, especially from Downtown on west through the Frontier Park area, is lovely. The east side could use some work---just like Cleveland and Buffalo.
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Old 12-28-2017, 08:21 AM
 
329 posts, read 163,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
I expected Boston to be like any other city and no big deal, but I was wrong. It's a really nice city with lots to do. I enjoy going there from time to time.

Providence was also a lot nicer than I expected.

Portland (Maine) wasn't as exciting as I had expected. When I toured it while at college, I thought it was really nice and lots to do. But after being there for a year, it got SO boring. I also went in the late summer when everyone was out, more things were open, it was busier, etc. Yeah, that was true for like a month of being away at college. It was always too cold to go out, a lot of stores closed most of the time I was there, going the same places got boring...don't get me wrong, it's a very nice city to visit, but I couldn't stand living there at college.
Agree. Tried to rep you but a big sign came floating down saying "You cannot give reputation to this user." I thought maybe you were in C/D jail but then I looked closer and noticed that you were not a member. Come join the fun! What's not to like?
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Old 12-28-2017, 08:31 AM
 
329 posts, read 163,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coolhand68 View Post
Atlantic City...I pictured it as a nice seaside city with world class casino's and entertainment, great restaurants, and a nice area to explore away from the boardwalk...I could not have been more wrong.

.
The last time I was in Atlantic City was the late '80's or early '90's and I was totally shocked (I had agreed to go there with family members who liked to gamble). Besides the dilapidated condition of the city (except for the glitzy casinos on the Boardwalk), all I remember was the huge, gaudy Trump Casino with the humongous signs with his name on it. The whole experience was something that totally went against my philosophy of life and I ended up driving around the dilapidated areas where I stopped at a liquor store to find a bottle of booze at a decent price. I may have been naive but the people in the store were very friendly and down-to--earth.
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Old 12-28-2017, 08:42 AM
 
329 posts, read 163,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
I thought I would like Coeur d'Alene more than I did. I was expecting a rugged western town, but instead it was upscale with a lot of boutiques.
I remember going through Coeur d'Alene a couple of time in the '90's and thinking it was a beautiful northwest mountain town on the lake, surrounded by beautiful forests and mountain views. However, driving around town I saw lovely little neighborhoods but the houses were so SMALL and boxy! Now I grew up in a small home and I actually love small homes as I'm kind of a minimalist, but I do remember remarking that these homes were particularly small. Well, apparently I can put my worries to rest. I have Googled and "Zillowed" the area recently and my impressions could not have been further from the truth. It's turned into an upscale, boutique-town just like you wrote. Many million-dollar homes around the lake, expensive condos, and I'm guessing additions and upgrades have been made on those 'small, boxy' homes because they all look much bigger now and they're all expensive! It's still a beautiful area though, looking through the internet. Expensive, but not too overrun with suburban ugliness, IMHO!

Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
Cheyenne exceeded my expectations. I didn't think I would like the place but it was a nice city when I visited..
I first visited Cheyenne in 1976 and fell in love with it. I moved there for a few years in the early 2000's and it still charmed me.
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:09 AM
 
329 posts, read 163,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Have you ever been to the RGV? Its literally right on the border, so there is alot of back and forth. Knowing Spanish isn't required, but he is correct, if you don't speak at least some Spanish it will be more difficult.
When I was there about 20 years ago there were a lot of snowbirds in the winter so there was a lot of English spoken. However, when I moved to Miami in the early 2000's I was told by several employment agencies that they couldn't help me if I didn't speak Spanish and told me to move to Fort Lauderdale. I was very surprised, if not a bit naive. Many times I would enter stores and the clerks would conduct the transaction in Spanish. I knew just enough and could look at the cash register totals to get buy so I didn't mind. In officially bilingual Montreal however, I'd walk in stores hoping to speak French and the clerks would greet and address me in English, which was a bit disappointing. Oh well.
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Old 12-28-2017, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
5,616 posts, read 3,959,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post

I was disappointed at Phoenix, very ugly built environment and the whole metro was really parceled off by a grid of 6 lane roads with strip malls on the corners and sound barriers everywhere. It felt so devoid of life.
You were in the wrong areas then.


That's like someone visiting near west of south sides of Chicago and painting the entire city based on what they saw.
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Old 12-28-2017, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,799 posts, read 19,054,473 times
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Good:

* Philadelphia - Definitely an underrated city.

* Chicago - Obviously if you know me, I love the city and lived there for quite awhile, but before I had moved there I thought it was a POS place everywhere based on what I saw/read in the media back in the day. That turned out to be really wrong.

* Miami Beach - For some reason I like it a lot..

* Charleston, SC - Okay, some of the beach areas that might not be in Charleston, but they're nice regardless.

Not so good:
* Honolulu - I went in with the expectation that it would be awesome and while it was a good city, I was a bit let down by it. Not a bad place though.
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Old 12-28-2017, 11:29 PM
 
Location: AZ
1,454 posts, read 3,948,503 times
Reputation: 763
I expected to not like San Francisco at all. I'm not sure why, but I always had this idea that I'd just hate every minute in San Francisco, but the times I've visited, I couldn't have possibly had more fun. It taught me a lot about not judging a place until actually visiting.
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